Richard Kiel, the 7-foot-2 actor who played Jaws, the James Bond villain with the teeth of steel, died Wednesday. He was 74. Kiel broke his leg last week and died in St. Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, Calif., according to several media reports. 

James Bond Villain Richard Kiel Dies at 74

Richard Kiel, the 7-foot-2 actor who played Jaws, the James Bond villain with the teeth of steel, died Wednesday. He was 74. Kiel broke his leg last week and died in St. Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, Calif., according to several media reports.

James Bond Villain Richard Kiel Dies at 74

The number of independent bookstores in the US rose by more than 20% between 2009 and 2014, according to the American Booksellers Association, a finding that may surprise bibliophiles who worry about rising costs for smaller shops and competition from larger chains. 

Independent bookstores are alive and well in America - Quartz

The number of independent bookstores in the US rose by more than 20% between 2009 and 2014, according to the American Booksellers Association, a finding that may surprise bibliophiles who worry about rising costs for smaller shops and competition from larger chains.

Independent bookstores are alive and well in America - Quartz

New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo

New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.

As I return to New York City from a summer in Europe, two days before the 12th anniversary of 9/11, I glance up to see the Tribute in Light – two ghostly, beautifully impossible shafts of light representing the World Trade Centre towers. Before these shafts of light stands the now single-finger gesture of the Freedom Tower, dominating the skyline just as the Twin Towers did. A sliver of new moon floats nearby. 

The relevance of these symbols brings me, well, back home. I’ve lived in NYC since 1987, 1993 or 1997, depending on which government agency you ask. On the morning of 9/11, I was asleep in my apartment on Jane Street in the Meatpacking District, just north of Ground Zero. I received a phone call saying New York was under a terrorist attack and that I needed to leave as soon as possible. I sat up in bed and heard the sirens outside my bedroom window. I looked down at my naked legs, and said out loud, “Oh fuck.” 

My notion of home had suddenly changed. But what is home, anyway? Cue the Gang of Four song, At Home He’s A Tourist. I’ve felt that way about everywhere I’ve lived since the age of seven, when I first moved from the States to Frankfurt, Germany, with my military father and family. My life has been nomadic by both necessity and choice. I’ve looked at my homes as “bases” –places I return to when I’m away from a home-like base. I know that sounds Arthur C Clarke, but it’s true. 

Michael Stipe: ‘Are we that warlike, that childish, that afraid?’ | Art and design | The Guardian

As I return to New York City from a summer in Europe, two days before the 12th anniversary of 9/11, I glance up to see the Tribute in Light – two ghostly, beautifully impossible shafts of light representing the World Trade Centre towers. Before these shafts of light stands the now single-finger gesture of the Freedom Tower, dominating the skyline just as the Twin Towers did. A sliver of new moon floats nearby.

The relevance of these symbols brings me, well, back home. I’ve lived in NYC since 1987, 1993 or 1997, depending on which government agency you ask. On the morning of 9/11, I was asleep in my apartment on Jane Street in the Meatpacking District, just north of Ground Zero. I received a phone call saying New York was under a terrorist attack and that I needed to leave as soon as possible. I sat up in bed and heard the sirens outside my bedroom window. I looked down at my naked legs, and said out loud, “Oh fuck.”

My notion of home had suddenly changed. But what is home, anyway? Cue the Gang of Four song, At Home He’s A Tourist. I’ve felt that way about everywhere I’ve lived since the age of seven, when I first moved from the States to Frankfurt, Germany, with my military father and family. My life has been nomadic by both necessity and choice. I’ve looked at my homes as “bases” –places I return to when I’m away from a home-like base. I know that sounds Arthur C Clarke, but it’s true.

Michael Stipe: ‘Are we that warlike, that childish, that afraid?’ | Art and design | The Guardian

On Earth Day, 1971, nonprofit organization Keep America Beautiful launched what the Ad Council would later call one of the “50 greatest commercials of all time.” 

Dubbed “The Crying Indian,” the one-minute PSA features a Native American man paddling down a junk-infested river, surrounded by smog, pollution, and trash; as he hauls his canoe onto the plastic-infested shore, a bag of rubbish is tossed from a car window, exploding at his feet. 

The camera then pans to the Indian’s cheerless face just as a single tear rolls down his cheek. 

The ad, which sought to combat pollution, was widely successful: It secured two Clio awards, incited a frenzy of community involvement, and helped reduce litter by 88% across 38 states. 

Its star performer, a man who went by the name “Iron Eyes Cody,” subsequently became the “face of Native Indians,” and was honored with a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. Advertisers estimate that his face, plastered on billboards, posters, and magazine ads, has been viewed 14 billion times, easily making him the most recognizable Native American figure of the century. 

But while Hollywood trumpeted Iron Eyes Cody as a “true Native American” and profited from his ubiquitous image, the man himself harbored an unspoken secret: he was 100% Italian. 

The True Story of ‘The Crying Indian’

On Earth Day, 1971, nonprofit organization Keep America Beautiful launched what the Ad Council would later call one of the “50 greatest commercials of all time.”

Dubbed “The Crying Indian,” the one-minute PSA features a Native American man paddling down a junk-infested river, surrounded by smog, pollution, and trash; as he hauls his canoe onto the plastic-infested shore, a bag of rubbish is tossed from a car window, exploding at his feet.

The camera then pans to the Indian’s cheerless face just as a single tear rolls down his cheek.

The ad, which sought to combat pollution, was widely successful: It secured two Clio awards, incited a frenzy of community involvement, and helped reduce litter by 88% across 38 states.

Its star performer, a man who went by the name “Iron Eyes Cody,” subsequently became the “face of Native Indians,” and was honored with a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. Advertisers estimate that his face, plastered on billboards, posters, and magazine ads, has been viewed 14 billion times, easily making him the most recognizable Native American figure of the century.

But while Hollywood trumpeted Iron Eyes Cody as a “true Native American” and profited from his ubiquitous image, the man himself harbored an unspoken secret: he was 100% Italian.

The True Story of ‘The Crying Indian’

The Elwha River is finally running free after more than 100 years, allowing salmon to swim all the way upstream to their ancestral mating grounds.

(Source: vimeo.com)

This photo came straight off the new camera on the iPhone 6 without any retouching, according to Apple. #AppleLive
via 

This photo came straight off the new camera on the iPhone 6 without any retouching, according to Apple. #AppleLive

via