condenasttraveler:

Photo by @trevortraynor at Machu Picchu, Peru: “I remember the journey the most. The long, dark, and humid hike to the ancient Inca ruins. By 5 a.m. I stood in the clouds almost 8,000 feet above sea level.” #machupicchu #peru #takemethere (at Machu Picchu)

condenasttraveler:

Photo by @trevortraynor at Machu Picchu, Peru: “I remember the journey the most. The long, dark, and humid hike to the ancient Inca ruins. By 5 a.m. I stood in the clouds almost 8,000 feet above sea level.” #machupicchu #peru #takemethere (at Machu Picchu)

For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
ZoomInfo
For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
ZoomInfo
For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
ZoomInfo
For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
ZoomInfo
For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
ZoomInfo
For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
ZoomInfo
For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
ZoomInfo

For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.

In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.

“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.

See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649

GQ:

Sexual assault is alarmingly common in the U.S. military, and more than half of the victims are men. According to the Pentagon, thirty-eight military men are sexually assaulted every single day. These are the stories you never hear—because the culprits almost always go free, the survivors rarely speak, and no one in the military or Congress has done enough to stop it.

Had photographer Marisa Scheinfeld, 33, been born a few decades earlier, she would have grown up in the heart of America’s quintessential vacationland rather than its modern-day ruins. 

When Scheinfeld was 6 years old, her family left New York City to move upstate, to a tiny slice of the Catskills called Kiamesha Lake. “It’s barely anything,” she says of the leafy hamlet, but from the 1920s through the 1960s, millions of Americans—including Scheinfeld’s father and grandparents—sought out the area’s nearly 600 hotels, 500 bungalow colonies and 1,000 rooming houses for a dose of relaxation, nature and indulgence. It was the American Dream meets Disney World meets a summer camp for adults. 

Photographing the End of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills

Had photographer Marisa Scheinfeld, 33, been born a few decades earlier, she would have grown up in the heart of America’s quintessential vacationland rather than its modern-day ruins.

When Scheinfeld was 6 years old, her family left New York City to move upstate, to a tiny slice of the Catskills called Kiamesha Lake. “It’s barely anything,” she says of the leafy hamlet, but from the 1920s through the 1960s, millions of Americans—including Scheinfeld’s father and grandparents—sought out the area’s nearly 600 hotels, 500 bungalow colonies and 1,000 rooming houses for a dose of relaxation, nature and indulgence. It was the American Dream meets Disney World meets a summer camp for adults.

Photographing the End of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills

ANTAKYA, Turkey — The black Dell laptop found in an Islamic State safe house inside Syria not only contains instructions for how to weaponize the bubonic plague, it also includes thousands of files that provide a window into how would-be jihadists become radicalized, and how they learn to carry out their deadly craft. 

Recipes From the Islamic State’s Laptop of Doom

ANTAKYA, Turkey — The black Dell laptop found in an Islamic State safe house inside Syria not only contains instructions for how to weaponize the bubonic plague, it also includes thousands of files that provide a window into how would-be jihadists become radicalized, and how they learn to carry out their deadly craft.

Recipes From the Islamic State’s Laptop of Doom

Richard Kiel, the 7-foot-2 actor who played Jaws, the James Bond villain with the teeth of steel, died Wednesday. He was 74. Kiel broke his leg last week and died in St. Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, Calif., according to several media reports. 

James Bond Villain Richard Kiel Dies at 74

Richard Kiel, the 7-foot-2 actor who played Jaws, the James Bond villain with the teeth of steel, died Wednesday. He was 74. Kiel broke his leg last week and died in St. Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, Calif., according to several media reports.

James Bond Villain Richard Kiel Dies at 74

The number of independent bookstores in the US rose by more than 20% between 2009 and 2014, according to the American Booksellers Association, a finding that may surprise bibliophiles who worry about rising costs for smaller shops and competition from larger chains. 

Independent bookstores are alive and well in America - Quartz

The number of independent bookstores in the US rose by more than 20% between 2009 and 2014, according to the American Booksellers Association, a finding that may surprise bibliophiles who worry about rising costs for smaller shops and competition from larger chains.

Independent bookstores are alive and well in America - Quartz