World’s Biggest Water Bugs Found in Sichuan, China

Insects the size of human faces have been found in Sichuan province, China, CNN reported. The Insect Museum of West China (which is a real thing, apparently) acquired the insects, which turned out to be dobsonflies, from villagers on the outskirts of Chengdu, CNN said. The largest insect had a wingspan of 8.27 inches and pincers roughly the size of a human pinkie finger.

World’s Biggest Water Bugs Found in Sichuan, China

Insects the size of human faces have been found in Sichuan province, China, CNN reported. The Insect Museum of West China (which is a real thing, apparently) acquired the insects, which turned out to be dobsonflies, from villagers on the outskirts of Chengdu, CNN said. The largest insect had a wingspan of 8.27 inches and pincers roughly the size of a human pinkie finger.

THE final battle of “The International”, a tournament for the video game Defense of the Ancient 2 (Dota 2), will be fought on July 21st. With a prize pool of $10.9m, the sum is a record for such competitions, known as electronic sports or e-sports. Strikingly, the bounty was largely raised by fans. As in previous years, the organiser and developer of the game, Valve, only put up $1.6m. 

Sales from “The Compendium”, an interactive programme with match details and in-game rewards, make up the rest. Around 4m programmes have been sold, which means that roughly half of Dota 2’s active monthly users have bought one. Last year, around a million people watched the final. (In South Korea, for example, e-sports are akin to a national sport and there is a television channel dedicated to them.) 

The International’s success is impressive considering that Dota, and the genre of games to which it belongs, have only existed for a decade (while the Tour de France dates from 1903). But another tournament is bigger still: the League of Legends Championship final last October brought in 8.5m concurrent viewers and 32m viewers in total, a 400% increase from 2012. That, in turn, could be surpassed this year—for The International’s final will be streamed on ESPN 3. 

Daily chart: Zap! Bang! Ka-ching! | The Economist

THE final battle of “The International”, a tournament for the video game Defense of the Ancient 2 (Dota 2), will be fought on July 21st. With a prize pool of $10.9m, the sum is a record for such competitions, known as electronic sports or e-sports. Strikingly, the bounty was largely raised by fans. As in previous years, the organiser and developer of the game, Valve, only put up $1.6m.

Sales from “The Compendium”, an interactive programme with match details and in-game rewards, make up the rest. Around 4m programmes have been sold, which means that roughly half of Dota 2’s active monthly users have bought one. Last year, around a million people watched the final. (In South Korea, for example, e-sports are akin to a national sport and there is a television channel dedicated to them.)

The International’s success is impressive considering that Dota, and the genre of games to which it belongs, have only existed for a decade (while the Tour de France dates from 1903). But another tournament is bigger still: the League of Legends Championship final last October brought in 8.5m concurrent viewers and 32m viewers in total, a 400% increase from 2012. That, in turn, could be surpassed this year—for The International’s final will be streamed on ESPN 3.

Daily chart: Zap! Bang! Ka-ching! | The Economist

As American, Russian, Ukrainian, and Malaysian politicians grapple over who is responsible for the tragic loss of the 295 lives aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight MH-17, the first high-resolution satellite images of the crash site have begun to filter in.
The images, in both color and black and white, show the aftermath of the downing, both immediately and some time after. Immediately after the plane went down, the wreckage was obscured by smoke that blanketed the area around the crash-site.
Some time later, the smoke cleared, revealing the crater where the plane came to rest. A stain of blackened earth radiated out from the wreckage.
ZoomInfo
As American, Russian, Ukrainian, and Malaysian politicians grapple over who is responsible for the tragic loss of the 295 lives aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight MH-17, the first high-resolution satellite images of the crash site have begun to filter in.
The images, in both color and black and white, show the aftermath of the downing, both immediately and some time after. Immediately after the plane went down, the wreckage was obscured by smoke that blanketed the area around the crash-site.
Some time later, the smoke cleared, revealing the crater where the plane came to rest. A stain of blackened earth radiated out from the wreckage.
ZoomInfo
As American, Russian, Ukrainian, and Malaysian politicians grapple over who is responsible for the tragic loss of the 295 lives aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight MH-17, the first high-resolution satellite images of the crash site have begun to filter in.
The images, in both color and black and white, show the aftermath of the downing, both immediately and some time after. Immediately after the plane went down, the wreckage was obscured by smoke that blanketed the area around the crash-site.
Some time later, the smoke cleared, revealing the crater where the plane came to rest. A stain of blackened earth radiated out from the wreckage.
ZoomInfo
As American, Russian, Ukrainian, and Malaysian politicians grapple over who is responsible for the tragic loss of the 295 lives aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight MH-17, the first high-resolution satellite images of the crash site have begun to filter in.
The images, in both color and black and white, show the aftermath of the downing, both immediately and some time after. Immediately after the plane went down, the wreckage was obscured by smoke that blanketed the area around the crash-site.
Some time later, the smoke cleared, revealing the crater where the plane came to rest. A stain of blackened earth radiated out from the wreckage.
ZoomInfo
Aviation history is littered with civilian planes that were shot from the sky, intentionally or not, by military weapons. Malaysia Flight 17 was cruising at 33,000 feet, more than half a mile higher than Mt. Everest, when a missile hit it July 17. And the missile’s range is believed to be more than twice that high. 

How high can a missile reach? - The Washington Post

Aviation history is littered with civilian planes that were shot from the sky, intentionally or not, by military weapons. Malaysia Flight 17 was cruising at 33,000 feet, more than half a mile higher than Mt. Everest, when a missile hit it July 17. And the missile’s range is believed to be more than twice that high.

How high can a missile reach? - The Washington Post

This is a map for the shortest possible road trip that hits all 48 contiguous states.https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=South+Berwick,+ME&daddr=Brattleboro,+VT+to:Westerly,+RI+to:40.19461,-74.81603+to:Wilmington,+DE+to:Washington,+DC+to:Chesapeake,+OH+to:Greenville,+SC+to:30.99755,-87.56855+to:Texarkana,+TX+to:36.998142,-94.6250571+to:New+Buffalo,+MI+to:42.511584,-90.6060572+to:Wahpeton,+ND+to:Cheyenne,+WY+to:Four+Corners+Road,+Apache,+NM+to:41.99297,-120.29832+to:Spokane,+WA+to:Taft,+MT&hl=en&ll=44.276671,-90.527344&spn=51.82841,62.929688&sll=40.07597,-74.836121&sspn=0.838561,1.234589&geocode=FYy0kwIdnIjH-ymZiclroKPiiTHY5-I9sdtkaA%3BFXfajQId2tqs-yn189F6jxvhiTFZPY2NR1oo-w%3BFT9fdwIdqQC4-ylvsUKNS-TliTEHtr_P1cKSNw%3BFTJSZQId4mWK-ynrUNcMM1fBiTGS5vhibmB9CQ%3BFSl5XgId1T9_-ylvr0ZcGA_HiTEAjDB3UNoWhQ%3BFQh-UQIdsoRo-ylb5PZa3sa3iTEqXYjUIkVSwg%3BFdRcSgId9c0V-yntHvmDwAlGiDHZW1zGvWAESg%3BFQrPEwIdZsQW-ykFEfpiZo9XiDGWdiW_d52q2A%3BFS782AEdWs_H-inDO8dPRYKaiDEQ-g_Tt8meJA%3BFeUG_gEdOPJk-ilXZKDCMkE0hjFwW9thkjxYnQ%3BFf6LNAId3yJc-ilLa5voXW7IhzGMbYicRv9rFA%3BFYq5fQIdlWTU-ikHuL06qwQRiDGTT_yDfE6-4g%3BFeCsiAIdF3aZ-ikf_yOKfSrjhzEl5HhcYeD0Cg%3BFZXzwQIdLek9-imFiebrHknJUjEAzWPJLZGtyw%3BFQ2_cwId6pHA-SmT73MudjhvhzErLZePQTAKsQ%3BFZ-ONAIdHRqA-Sll1ZKk0iU6hzHmmUNsD1zxbw%3BFQrDgAIdsGTU-Cn3LuetMCjKVDHsEjsABkBhNA%3BFRw31wIdgTgA-Snl57swXBieVDGx2YQL1sn83Q%3BFQyE0wIdkCAc-SmBLtw4rZJgUzE8ayzubyJPsQ&mra=dvme&mrsp=3&sz=10&via=3,8,10,12,16&t=m&z=4&dg=feature

(via

The state of California is suing San Francisco over the waterfront height limit that Bay Area residents voted into law back in June, arguing that the ballot measure usurps state power. 

If California finds that measure offensive, wait ‘til San Francisco gets a crack at a ballot proposal to break up the whole damned state. A proposal to divide California into six new states could appear on the November 2016 ballot, courtesy of venture capitalist and self-proclaimed “Riskmaster” Timothy Draper. 

According to Six Californias, the proposal has already garnered 1.3 million signatures, the first batch of which Draper submitted to election officials yesterday. If Draper has collected as many signatures as he says he has—and for the millions he’s spent on the effort, it had better be true—then this Six Flags Over California scheme will go before voters the year after next. 

Six Californias, One Super City-State - CityLab

The state of California is suing San Francisco over the waterfront height limit that Bay Area residents voted into law back in June, arguing that the ballot measure usurps state power.

If California finds that measure offensive, wait ‘til San Francisco gets a crack at a ballot proposal to break up the whole damned state. A proposal to divide California into six new states could appear on the November 2016 ballot, courtesy of venture capitalist and self-proclaimed “Riskmaster” Timothy Draper.

According to Six Californias, the proposal has already garnered 1.3 million signatures, the first batch of which Draper submitted to election officials yesterday. If Draper has collected as many signatures as he says he has—and for the millions he’s spent on the effort, it had better be true—then this Six Flags Over California scheme will go before voters the year after next.

Six Californias, One Super City-State - CityLab

Israel Launches Ground Invasion of Gaza

Israel initiated a ground invasion of Gaza on Thursday night, aimed at destroying tunnels used by Palestinians to infiltrate its territory, the New York Times reports. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ordered the Israeli Defense Forces to “prepare for further expanding the ground operation in Gaza if needed,” according to Haaretz correspondent Barak Ravid.

Buzzfeed reports Israeli tanks began shelling into eastern Gaza, while Israeli navy boats opened fire on western Gaza, hitting Gaza’s beaches. The two-pronged approach is meant to clear the way for ground troops to enter Gaza, according to Israeli officials.

Israeli tank fire killed three people in Gaza Thursday night, raising the Palestinian death toll from the last 10 days of fighting to 240, AFP reports.

Israel Launches Ground Invasion of Gaza

Israel initiated a ground invasion of Gaza on Thursday night, aimed at destroying tunnels used by Palestinians to infiltrate its territory, the New York Times reports. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ordered the Israeli Defense Forces to “prepare for further expanding the ground operation in Gaza if needed,” according to Haaretz correspondent Barak Ravid.

Buzzfeed reports Israeli tanks began shelling into eastern Gaza, while Israeli navy boats opened fire on western Gaza, hitting Gaza’s beaches. The two-pronged approach is meant to clear the way for ground troops to enter Gaza, according to Israeli officials.

Israeli tank fire killed three people in Gaza Thursday night, raising the Palestinian death toll from the last 10 days of fighting to 240, AFP reports.

breakingnews:

After crash, FAA bans U.S flights over eastern Ukraine 
Washington Post: The FAA issued a notice banning all U.S. flights from operating in eastern Ukrainian airspace on Thursday night.
The restriction comes in wake of reports that the downed Malaysia Airlines passenger jet, which was carrying 298 people, was shot out of the sky.
Follow updates on plane crash in Ukraine on breakingnews.com.
Photo: Emergency officials view the wreckage of the crashed jet in eastern Ukraine. (Maxim Zmeyev/Reuters)

breakingnews:

After crash, FAA bans U.S flights over eastern Ukraine 

Washington Post: The FAA issued a notice banning all U.S. flights from operating in eastern Ukrainian airspace on Thursday night.

The restriction comes in wake of reports that the downed Malaysia Airlines passenger jet, which was carrying 298 people, was shot out of the sky.

Follow updates on plane crash in Ukraine on breakingnews.com.

Photo: Emergency officials view the wreckage of the crashed jet in eastern Ukraine. (Maxim Zmeyev/Reuters)

If it turns out that the Malaysia Airlines 777 that crashed in Ukraine was indeed shot down, it won’t be the first time a commercial airliner was downed by military action. 

The most infamous instance occurred in 1983: Korean Air Lines Flight 007, a jumbo jet carrying 269 people, was gunned down by a Sukhoi Su-15 fighter jet after straying into Soviet airspace. 

The shock and outrage the rest of the world felt after that plane went down was captured on the September 12, 1983 cover of Newsweek: It shows a Korean Air Lines 747 with a bullseye over it; with “Murder in the Air” in large letters. 

Newsweek Rewind: When Korean Air Lines Flight 007 Was Shot Down

If it turns out that the Malaysia Airlines 777 that crashed in Ukraine was indeed shot down, it won’t be the first time a commercial airliner was downed by military action.

The most infamous instance occurred in 1983: Korean Air Lines Flight 007, a jumbo jet carrying 269 people, was gunned down by a Sukhoi Su-15 fighter jet after straying into Soviet airspace.

The shock and outrage the rest of the world felt after that plane went down was captured on the September 12, 1983 cover of Newsweek: It shows a Korean Air Lines 747 with a bullseye over it; with “Murder in the Air” in large letters.

Newsweek Rewind: When Korean Air Lines Flight 007 Was Shot Down