For many, the scenes of conflict from Ferguson, Missouri this week were a reminder of an era of racial conflict many Americans had hoped was far behind them — particularly in the era of the first black president. 

A peaceful night of demonstrations on Thursday was preceded by four nights of unrest in which the people of Ferguson attempted to protest the slaying of an unarmed 18-year-old black teenager, Michael Brown, and were met by battle-clad local police armed with military equipment. 

The police had sniper rifles pointed at peaceful protesters, used tear gas and rubber bullets, detained journalists and dismantled a filming crew’s camera equipment. The St. Louis suburb had become a war zone. 

What Michael Brown’s Death Says About America

For many, the scenes of conflict from Ferguson, Missouri this week were a reminder of an era of racial conflict many Americans had hoped was far behind them — particularly in the era of the first black president.

A peaceful night of demonstrations on Thursday was preceded by four nights of unrest in which the people of Ferguson attempted to protest the slaying of an unarmed 18-year-old black teenager, Michael Brown, and were met by battle-clad local police armed with military equipment.

The police had sniper rifles pointed at peaceful protesters, used tear gas and rubber bullets, detained journalists and dismantled a filming crew’s camera equipment. The St. Louis suburb had become a war zone.

What Michael Brown’s Death Says About America

Facebook might understand your romantic prospects better than you do. In a blog post published yesterday, the company’s team of data scientists announced that statistical evidence hints at budding relationships before the relationships start.
As couples become couples, Facebook data scientist Carlos Diuk writes, the two people enter a period of courtship, during which timeline posts increase. After the couple makes it official, their posts on each others’ walls decrease—presumably because the happy two are spending more time together.
In the post on Facebook’s data science blog, Diuk gives hard numbers: During the 100 days before the relationship starts, we observe a slow but steady increase in the number of timeline posts shared between the future couple. When the relationship starts (“day 0”), posts begin to decrease. We observe a peak of 1.67 posts per day 12 days before the relationship begins, and a lowest point of 1.53 posts per day 85 days into the relationship.
Presumably, couples decide to spend more time together, courtship is off, and online interactions give way to more interactions in the physical world.
When You Fall in Love, This Is What Facebook Sees - The Atlantic

Facebook might understand your romantic prospects better than you do. In a blog post published yesterday, the company’s team of data scientists announced that statistical evidence hints at budding relationships before the relationships start.

As couples become couples, Facebook data scientist Carlos Diuk writes, the two people enter a period of courtship, during which timeline posts increase. After the couple makes it official, their posts on each others’ walls decrease—presumably because the happy two are spending more time together.

In the post on Facebook’s data science blog, Diuk gives hard numbers: During the 100 days before the relationship starts, we observe a slow but steady increase in the number of timeline posts shared between the future couple. When the relationship starts (“day 0”), posts begin to decrease. We observe a peak of 1.67 posts per day 12 days before the relationship begins, and a lowest point of 1.53 posts per day 85 days into the relationship.

Presumably, couples decide to spend more time together, courtship is off, and online interactions give way to more interactions in the physical world.

When You Fall in Love, This Is What Facebook Sees - The Atlantic

Researchers at Oxford University’s Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine have developed software that can detect the risk for genetic disorders in children, such as Down and Treacher Collins syndromes, just by scanning old photographs of their family members.

More than 7,000 rare genetic disorders are known, and although each is unique, there is at least one common thread: 30 to 40 percent of them involve detectable abnormalities in the cranium and face. The Oxford project, called Clinical Face Phenotype Space, builds on this knowledge, melding machine learning and computer technology to scan family photos and cross-reference them with a database built from images of people with known genetic disorders.

The Clinical Face Phenotype Space recognizes faces in photographs regardless of a person’s pose or facial expression, image quality, lighting variations or other factors.

A research team at Harvard and MIT announced today that they’ve created a self-assembling robot. The machine, which begins as a flat sheet of material, exploits principles of origami to fold itself into a 3-D robot capable of walking without any human assistance. 

"We have achieved a long-standing personal goal to design a machine that can assemble itself," Daniela Rus, an MIT roboticist and one of the study’s authors, said in a press conference about the robot. 

The robot is made out of a flat multi-layered sheet of material outfitted with circuitry and motors. In this sheet, the researchers made slices (called hinges) along which folding will occur. The self-assembly works as follows: After the sheet is hooked up to a battery, heating elements embedded in the material activate. This temperature change prompts certain layers to contract. Guided by the hinges, the contraction causes the flat sheet to fold into a predetermined 3-D structure—in this case a walking robot. In all, the assembly process takes around four minutes. 

Origami Robot Can Self-Assemble and Walk Without Human Help

A research team at Harvard and MIT announced today that they’ve created a self-assembling robot. The machine, which begins as a flat sheet of material, exploits principles of origami to fold itself into a 3-D robot capable of walking without any human assistance.

"We have achieved a long-standing personal goal to design a machine that can assemble itself," Daniela Rus, an MIT roboticist and one of the study’s authors, said in a press conference about the robot.

The robot is made out of a flat multi-layered sheet of material outfitted with circuitry and motors. In this sheet, the researchers made slices (called hinges) along which folding will occur. The self-assembly works as follows: After the sheet is hooked up to a battery, heating elements embedded in the material activate. This temperature change prompts certain layers to contract. Guided by the hinges, the contraction causes the flat sheet to fold into a predetermined 3-D structure—in this case a walking robot. In all, the assembly process takes around four minutes.

Origami Robot Can Self-Assemble and Walk Without Human Help

How does the end of a real-life relationship change our enduring relationship with social networks? What can be done to make real-life breakups less debilitating? How can we make them harder, if we’re into that sort of thing for artistic suffering or whatever, not that I am? 

When You Fall Out of Love, This Is What Facebook Sees - The Atlantic

How does the end of a real-life relationship change our enduring relationship with social networks? What can be done to make real-life breakups less debilitating? How can we make them harder, if we’re into that sort of thing for artistic suffering or whatever, not that I am?

When You Fall Out of Love, This Is What Facebook Sees - The Atlantic

Demonstrators raise their hands while protesting the shooting death of teenager #MichaelBrown, in #Ferguson, Missouri, August 13, 2014. 📷 Mario Anzuoni/Reuters.

Demonstrators raise their hands while protesting the shooting death of teenager #MichaelBrown, in #Ferguson, Missouri, August 13, 2014. 📷 Mario Anzuoni/Reuters.

We’ve decided to look deeper at the matter by exploring average internet speeds by state with this map. Using Akamai’s “State of the Internet” Report, we were able to find the average internet speed in each state. 

The speeds are measured in megabits per second (mbps) which is simply a measurement of data transfer speed within a network. In our map, darker greens represent faster speeds and lighter greens represent slower speeds. 

The Northeast has some of the fastest speeds in the nation, while the Midwest and less populated states have generally slower speeds. The state with the fastest speed was Virginia at 13.7 average mbps, while the slowest belonged to Alaska at 7 average mbps. Check out our map and see where your state ranks! 

Internet Speeds by State: MAP - Broadview OfficeSuite Blog

We’ve decided to look deeper at the matter by exploring average internet speeds by state with this map. Using Akamai’s “State of the Internet” Report, we were able to find the average internet speed in each state.

The speeds are measured in megabits per second (mbps) which is simply a measurement of data transfer speed within a network. In our map, darker greens represent faster speeds and lighter greens represent slower speeds.

The Northeast has some of the fastest speeds in the nation, while the Midwest and less populated states have generally slower speeds. The state with the fastest speed was Virginia at 13.7 average mbps, while the slowest belonged to Alaska at 7 average mbps. Check out our map and see where your state ranks!

Internet Speeds by State: MAP - Broadview OfficeSuite Blog

Meyer Shussett was a fifty-two-year-old salesman from Pittsburgh who had lost a lot of money in the depression. 

He took a train to New Castle on a January weekend in 1933 and spent Saturday night walking from bar to bar with boxes of counterfeit Pollock cigars, which he sold cheap until he was arrested by a patrolman. 

The mayor fined him $20. 

Later—after the Depression, after the war—he managed a variety store in Pittsburgh. 

One morning in 1951, he had just opened the store when a man walked in and asked for a T-shirt. 

When Meyer turned to get a box down from the shelf, the man hit him on the head with a brick. 

After finding only a few dollars in the register, the man hit him with the brick again and left the store. Meyer went home. His family took him to the hospital, where he was given fourteen stitches to close his wounds. 

There is no further record of his life. Sources: New Castle News (16 January 1933, “Pittsburgh Man Pays Heavy Fine”; 9 October 1951, “Thug Uses Brick”); Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 9 October 1951, “Thug Beats Up Storekeeper”. 

Meyer Shussett, “Suspicion”, 14 January 1933 | Small Town Noir

Meyer Shussett was a fifty-two-year-old salesman from Pittsburgh who had lost a lot of money in the depression.

He took a train to New Castle on a January weekend in 1933 and spent Saturday night walking from bar to bar with boxes of counterfeit Pollock cigars, which he sold cheap until he was arrested by a patrolman.

The mayor fined him $20.

Later—after the Depression, after the war—he managed a variety store in Pittsburgh.

One morning in 1951, he had just opened the store when a man walked in and asked for a T-shirt.

When Meyer turned to get a box down from the shelf, the man hit him on the head with a brick.

After finding only a few dollars in the register, the man hit him with the brick again and left the store. Meyer went home. His family took him to the hospital, where he was given fourteen stitches to close his wounds.

There is no further record of his life. Sources: New Castle News (16 January 1933, “Pittsburgh Man Pays Heavy Fine”; 9 October 1951, “Thug Uses Brick”); Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 9 October 1951, “Thug Beats Up Storekeeper”.

Meyer Shussett, “Suspicion”, 14 January 1933 | Small Town Noir