New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
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New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo
New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.
ZoomInfo

New Yorkers marked the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with moments of reflection and honor for those lost. At the North Pool, a memorial observance at the site of the World Trade Center saw politicians, dignitaries and victims’ relatives gathering. Washington and Pennsylvania also remembered the nearly 3,000 people killed in al Qaeda’s attacks with services of their own.

As I return to New York City from a summer in Europe, two days before the 12th anniversary of 9/11, I glance up to see the Tribute in Light – two ghostly, beautifully impossible shafts of light representing the World Trade Centre towers. Before these shafts of light stands the now single-finger gesture of the Freedom Tower, dominating the skyline just as the Twin Towers did. A sliver of new moon floats nearby. 

The relevance of these symbols brings me, well, back home. I’ve lived in NYC since 1987, 1993 or 1997, depending on which government agency you ask. On the morning of 9/11, I was asleep in my apartment on Jane Street in the Meatpacking District, just north of Ground Zero. I received a phone call saying New York was under a terrorist attack and that I needed to leave as soon as possible. I sat up in bed and heard the sirens outside my bedroom window. I looked down at my naked legs, and said out loud, “Oh fuck.” 

My notion of home had suddenly changed. But what is home, anyway? Cue the Gang of Four song, At Home He’s A Tourist. I’ve felt that way about everywhere I’ve lived since the age of seven, when I first moved from the States to Frankfurt, Germany, with my military father and family. My life has been nomadic by both necessity and choice. I’ve looked at my homes as “bases” –places I return to when I’m away from a home-like base. I know that sounds Arthur C Clarke, but it’s true. 

Michael Stipe: ‘Are we that warlike, that childish, that afraid?’ | Art and design | The Guardian

As I return to New York City from a summer in Europe, two days before the 12th anniversary of 9/11, I glance up to see the Tribute in Light – two ghostly, beautifully impossible shafts of light representing the World Trade Centre towers. Before these shafts of light stands the now single-finger gesture of the Freedom Tower, dominating the skyline just as the Twin Towers did. A sliver of new moon floats nearby.

The relevance of these symbols brings me, well, back home. I’ve lived in NYC since 1987, 1993 or 1997, depending on which government agency you ask. On the morning of 9/11, I was asleep in my apartment on Jane Street in the Meatpacking District, just north of Ground Zero. I received a phone call saying New York was under a terrorist attack and that I needed to leave as soon as possible. I sat up in bed and heard the sirens outside my bedroom window. I looked down at my naked legs, and said out loud, “Oh fuck.”

My notion of home had suddenly changed. But what is home, anyway? Cue the Gang of Four song, At Home He’s A Tourist. I’ve felt that way about everywhere I’ve lived since the age of seven, when I first moved from the States to Frankfurt, Germany, with my military father and family. My life has been nomadic by both necessity and choice. I’ve looked at my homes as “bases” –places I return to when I’m away from a home-like base. I know that sounds Arthur C Clarke, but it’s true.

Michael Stipe: ‘Are we that warlike, that childish, that afraid?’ | Art and design | The Guardian

On Earth Day, 1971, nonprofit organization Keep America Beautiful launched what the Ad Council would later call one of the “50 greatest commercials of all time.” 

Dubbed “The Crying Indian,” the one-minute PSA features a Native American man paddling down a junk-infested river, surrounded by smog, pollution, and trash; as he hauls his canoe onto the plastic-infested shore, a bag of rubbish is tossed from a car window, exploding at his feet. 

The camera then pans to the Indian’s cheerless face just as a single tear rolls down his cheek. 

The ad, which sought to combat pollution, was widely successful: It secured two Clio awards, incited a frenzy of community involvement, and helped reduce litter by 88% across 38 states. 

Its star performer, a man who went by the name “Iron Eyes Cody,” subsequently became the “face of Native Indians,” and was honored with a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. Advertisers estimate that his face, plastered on billboards, posters, and magazine ads, has been viewed 14 billion times, easily making him the most recognizable Native American figure of the century. 

But while Hollywood trumpeted Iron Eyes Cody as a “true Native American” and profited from his ubiquitous image, the man himself harbored an unspoken secret: he was 100% Italian. 

The True Story of ‘The Crying Indian’

On Earth Day, 1971, nonprofit organization Keep America Beautiful launched what the Ad Council would later call one of the “50 greatest commercials of all time.”

Dubbed “The Crying Indian,” the one-minute PSA features a Native American man paddling down a junk-infested river, surrounded by smog, pollution, and trash; as he hauls his canoe onto the plastic-infested shore, a bag of rubbish is tossed from a car window, exploding at his feet.

The camera then pans to the Indian’s cheerless face just as a single tear rolls down his cheek.

The ad, which sought to combat pollution, was widely successful: It secured two Clio awards, incited a frenzy of community involvement, and helped reduce litter by 88% across 38 states.

Its star performer, a man who went by the name “Iron Eyes Cody,” subsequently became the “face of Native Indians,” and was honored with a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. Advertisers estimate that his face, plastered on billboards, posters, and magazine ads, has been viewed 14 billion times, easily making him the most recognizable Native American figure of the century.

But while Hollywood trumpeted Iron Eyes Cody as a “true Native American” and profited from his ubiquitous image, the man himself harbored an unspoken secret: he was 100% Italian.

The True Story of ‘The Crying Indian’

The Elwha River is finally running free after more than 100 years, allowing salmon to swim all the way upstream to their ancestral mating grounds.

(Source: vimeo.com)

This photo came straight off the new camera on the iPhone 6 without any retouching, according to Apple. #AppleLive
via 

This photo came straight off the new camera on the iPhone 6 without any retouching, according to Apple. #AppleLive

via 

One of two British explorer ships that disappeared in the Arctic nearly 170 years ago has been found, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced Tuesday. 

The HMS Erebus and HMS Terror were last seen in the 1840s. Canada announced in 2008 that it would search for the ships led by British Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin. 

Harper, speaking in Ottawa, said it remains unclear which ship has been found, but images show there’s enough information to confirm it’s one of the pair. 

Franklin and 128 hand-picked officers and men vanished on an expedition in 1846 to find the fabled Northwest Passage. Franklin’s disappearance prompted one of history’s largest and longest rescue searches, from 1848 to 1859, which resulted in the passage’s long-sought discovery. 

The passage runs from the Atlantic to the Pacific through the Arctic archipelago. European explorers sought the passage as a shorter route to Asia, but found it rendered inhospitable by ice and weather. 

"This is truly a historic moment for Canada," said Harper, who was beaming, uncharacteristically. "This has been a great Canadian story and mystery and the subject of scientists, historians, writers and singers so I think we really have an important day in mapping the history of our country." 

Canada finds 1 of 2 explorer ships lost in Arctic

One of two British explorer ships that disappeared in the Arctic nearly 170 years ago has been found, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced Tuesday.

The HMS Erebus and HMS Terror were last seen in the 1840s. Canada announced in 2008 that it would search for the ships led by British Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin.

Harper, speaking in Ottawa, said it remains unclear which ship has been found, but images show there’s enough information to confirm it’s one of the pair.

Franklin and 128 hand-picked officers and men vanished on an expedition in 1846 to find the fabled Northwest Passage. Franklin’s disappearance prompted one of history’s largest and longest rescue searches, from 1848 to 1859, which resulted in the passage’s long-sought discovery.

The passage runs from the Atlantic to the Pacific through the Arctic archipelago. European explorers sought the passage as a shorter route to Asia, but found it rendered inhospitable by ice and weather.

"This is truly a historic moment for Canada," said Harper, who was beaming, uncharacteristically. "This has been a great Canadian story and mystery and the subject of scientists, historians, writers and singers so I think we really have an important day in mapping the history of our country."

Canada finds 1 of 2 explorer ships lost in Arctic

Argentine Rock Giant Gustavo Cerati Dies After Years in Coma

Gustavo Cerati, one of Latin America’s most celebrated musicians, considered Argentina’s most legendary rock star, died on Thursday from respiratory problems, his family said in a message on his official Facebook page. He was 55.

Cerati had been in a coma since 2010, after suffering from a stroke following a solo concert in Caracas, Venezuela.

While in a coma, Cerati was named a “Distinguished Citizen” by the city of Buenos Aires, his birthplace. Numerous highly-respected musicians, including Argentina’s Fito Paez, Colombian Shakira, Uruguayan Jorge Drexler and Mexican band Café Tacvba, paid tribute to Cerati during this time.

Argentine Rock Giant Gustavo Cerati Dies After Years in Coma

Gustavo Cerati, one of Latin America’s most celebrated musicians, considered Argentina’s most legendary rock star, died on Thursday from respiratory problems, his family said in a message on his official Facebook page. He was 55.

Cerati had been in a coma since 2010, after suffering from a stroke following a solo concert in Caracas, Venezuela.

While in a coma, Cerati was named a “Distinguished Citizen” by the city of Buenos Aires, his birthplace. Numerous highly-respected musicians, including Argentina’s Fito Paez, Colombian Shakira, Uruguayan Jorge Drexler and Mexican band Café Tacvba, paid tribute to Cerati during this time.

LUMBERTON, N.C. — The most memorable moment of the trial that put Henry McCollum and Leon Brown behind bars for three decades for a hideous 1983 rape and murder was a display of brilliant courtroom theatrics.

District Attorney Joe Freeman Britt of Robeson County, who stood 6-foot-6 and came to be known as America’s “Deadliest D.A.,” asked jurors to try to hold their breath for five minutes — the time it took the 11-year-old victim to choke to death, after her killer stuffed her panties down her throat with a stick — to get a small sense of the horror she experienced.

The jury came back with two of the more than 40 death penalty convictions Mr. Britt won over almost two decades.

Those two convictions were obtained on the basis of inconsistent, soon recanted, confessions from two mentally impaired teenagers who said they had been coerced to sign statements written by interrogators, and testimony by an informer who previously did not implicate the two. They were overturned last week, and Mr. McCollum and Mr. Brown were exonerated and set free.

Their release concluded a judicial horror story in which the two men were sent to death row though no physical evidence linked them to the murder. At the same time, a serial sex offender who lived less than 100 yards from the crime scene — and who, a few weeks after that murder, would kill a teenage girl nearby in strikingly similar circumstances — was never pursued as a suspect.

How Long Before Hamas Realizes It Lost the War?

Israelis have entered the second full week of what everyone hopes will be a permanent ceasefire. Very rapidly, Tel Aviv has seemingly returned to normal.

However, my fragile calm was ruptured one recent night at midnight. I was so startled by a screeching sound that I went out on my balcony to see if everything was OK. Happily, I quickly realized that the discordant blaring wail (which I had not heard for a month) was merely a return of aircraft to their normal flight path (i.e. over Tel Aviv, when landing at Ben-Gurion Airport – a flight path that planes did not take during the nearly two months of warfare.)

The streets of Tel Aviv are once again full at night. People have gone back to the restaurants and bars they avoided during the war. Every restaurateur who I spoke with in Tel Aviv reported the same thing (a 50 percent drop in business during the war.) People just stopped going out. They preferred to remain as close to home as possible.

How Long Before Hamas Realizes It Lost the War?

Israelis have entered the second full week of what everyone hopes will be a permanent ceasefire. Very rapidly, Tel Aviv has seemingly returned to normal.

However, my fragile calm was ruptured one recent night at midnight. I was so startled by a screeching sound that I went out on my balcony to see if everything was OK. Happily, I quickly realized that the discordant blaring wail (which I had not heard for a month) was merely a return of aircraft to their normal flight path (i.e. over Tel Aviv, when landing at Ben-Gurion Airport – a flight path that planes did not take during the nearly two months of warfare.)

The streets of Tel Aviv are once again full at night. People have gone back to the restaurants and bars they avoided during the war. Every restaurateur who I spoke with in Tel Aviv reported the same thing (a 50 percent drop in business during the war.) People just stopped going out. They preferred to remain as close to home as possible.