One of two British explorer ships that disappeared in the Arctic nearly 170 years ago has been found, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced Tuesday. 

The HMS Erebus and HMS Terror were last seen in the 1840s. Canada announced in 2008 that it would search for the ships led by British Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin. 

Harper, speaking in Ottawa, said it remains unclear which ship has been found, but images show there’s enough information to confirm it’s one of the pair. 

Franklin and 128 hand-picked officers and men vanished on an expedition in 1846 to find the fabled Northwest Passage. Franklin’s disappearance prompted one of history’s largest and longest rescue searches, from 1848 to 1859, which resulted in the passage’s long-sought discovery. 

The passage runs from the Atlantic to the Pacific through the Arctic archipelago. European explorers sought the passage as a shorter route to Asia, but found it rendered inhospitable by ice and weather. 

"This is truly a historic moment for Canada," said Harper, who was beaming, uncharacteristically. "This has been a great Canadian story and mystery and the subject of scientists, historians, writers and singers so I think we really have an important day in mapping the history of our country." 

Canada finds 1 of 2 explorer ships lost in Arctic

One of two British explorer ships that disappeared in the Arctic nearly 170 years ago has been found, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced Tuesday.

The HMS Erebus and HMS Terror were last seen in the 1840s. Canada announced in 2008 that it would search for the ships led by British Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin.

Harper, speaking in Ottawa, said it remains unclear which ship has been found, but images show there’s enough information to confirm it’s one of the pair.

Franklin and 128 hand-picked officers and men vanished on an expedition in 1846 to find the fabled Northwest Passage. Franklin’s disappearance prompted one of history’s largest and longest rescue searches, from 1848 to 1859, which resulted in the passage’s long-sought discovery.

The passage runs from the Atlantic to the Pacific through the Arctic archipelago. European explorers sought the passage as a shorter route to Asia, but found it rendered inhospitable by ice and weather.

"This is truly a historic moment for Canada," said Harper, who was beaming, uncharacteristically. "This has been a great Canadian story and mystery and the subject of scientists, historians, writers and singers so I think we really have an important day in mapping the history of our country."

Canada finds 1 of 2 explorer ships lost in Arctic

Argentine Rock Giant Gustavo Cerati Dies After Years in Coma

Gustavo Cerati, one of Latin America’s most celebrated musicians, considered Argentina’s most legendary rock star, died on Thursday from respiratory problems, his family said in a message on his official Facebook page. He was 55.

Cerati had been in a coma since 2010, after suffering from a stroke following a solo concert in Caracas, Venezuela.

While in a coma, Cerati was named a “Distinguished Citizen” by the city of Buenos Aires, his birthplace. Numerous highly-respected musicians, including Argentina’s Fito Paez, Colombian Shakira, Uruguayan Jorge Drexler and Mexican band Café Tacvba, paid tribute to Cerati during this time.

Argentine Rock Giant Gustavo Cerati Dies After Years in Coma

Gustavo Cerati, one of Latin America’s most celebrated musicians, considered Argentina’s most legendary rock star, died on Thursday from respiratory problems, his family said in a message on his official Facebook page. He was 55.

Cerati had been in a coma since 2010, after suffering from a stroke following a solo concert in Caracas, Venezuela.

While in a coma, Cerati was named a “Distinguished Citizen” by the city of Buenos Aires, his birthplace. Numerous highly-respected musicians, including Argentina’s Fito Paez, Colombian Shakira, Uruguayan Jorge Drexler and Mexican band Café Tacvba, paid tribute to Cerati during this time.

LUMBERTON, N.C. — The most memorable moment of the trial that put Henry McCollum and Leon Brown behind bars for three decades for a hideous 1983 rape and murder was a display of brilliant courtroom theatrics.

District Attorney Joe Freeman Britt of Robeson County, who stood 6-foot-6 and came to be known as America’s “Deadliest D.A.,” asked jurors to try to hold their breath for five minutes — the time it took the 11-year-old victim to choke to death, after her killer stuffed her panties down her throat with a stick — to get a small sense of the horror she experienced.

The jury came back with two of the more than 40 death penalty convictions Mr. Britt won over almost two decades.

Those two convictions were obtained on the basis of inconsistent, soon recanted, confessions from two mentally impaired teenagers who said they had been coerced to sign statements written by interrogators, and testimony by an informer who previously did not implicate the two. They were overturned last week, and Mr. McCollum and Mr. Brown were exonerated and set free.

Their release concluded a judicial horror story in which the two men were sent to death row though no physical evidence linked them to the murder. At the same time, a serial sex offender who lived less than 100 yards from the crime scene — and who, a few weeks after that murder, would kill a teenage girl nearby in strikingly similar circumstances — was never pursued as a suspect.

How Long Before Hamas Realizes It Lost the War?

Israelis have entered the second full week of what everyone hopes will be a permanent ceasefire. Very rapidly, Tel Aviv has seemingly returned to normal.

However, my fragile calm was ruptured one recent night at midnight. I was so startled by a screeching sound that I went out on my balcony to see if everything was OK. Happily, I quickly realized that the discordant blaring wail (which I had not heard for a month) was merely a return of aircraft to their normal flight path (i.e. over Tel Aviv, when landing at Ben-Gurion Airport – a flight path that planes did not take during the nearly two months of warfare.)

The streets of Tel Aviv are once again full at night. People have gone back to the restaurants and bars they avoided during the war. Every restaurateur who I spoke with in Tel Aviv reported the same thing (a 50 percent drop in business during the war.) People just stopped going out. They preferred to remain as close to home as possible.

How Long Before Hamas Realizes It Lost the War?

Israelis have entered the second full week of what everyone hopes will be a permanent ceasefire. Very rapidly, Tel Aviv has seemingly returned to normal.

However, my fragile calm was ruptured one recent night at midnight. I was so startled by a screeching sound that I went out on my balcony to see if everything was OK. Happily, I quickly realized that the discordant blaring wail (which I had not heard for a month) was merely a return of aircraft to their normal flight path (i.e. over Tel Aviv, when landing at Ben-Gurion Airport – a flight path that planes did not take during the nearly two months of warfare.)

The streets of Tel Aviv are once again full at night. People have gone back to the restaurants and bars they avoided during the war. Every restaurateur who I spoke with in Tel Aviv reported the same thing (a 50 percent drop in business during the war.) People just stopped going out. They preferred to remain as close to home as possible.

Map Shows All The Devices In The World Connected To The Internet | IFLScience

The image above isn’t your average map: it shows the location of all devices connected to the Internet in the world. The redder the area, the more devices there are.

The map was created by John Matherly, founder of the search engine Shodan and self-proclaimed Internet cartographer. To produce it, Matherly sent ping requests on August 2 to every IP address on the Internet and plotted the positive responses. There’s nothing shady or illegal about this; pings are simply network utilities which transmit an echo-request message to an IP address.

It took him just five hours to collect the data, but a further 12 to generate the image. Matherly notes on reddit that his ping requests would only reach devices that are directly connected to the Internet, such as routers. However, he has sometimes picked up smart phones.

Map Shows All The Devices In The World Connected To The Internet | IFLScience

The image above isn’t your average map: it shows the location of all devices connected to the Internet in the world. The redder the area, the more devices there are.

The map was created by John Matherly, founder of the search engine Shodan and self-proclaimed Internet cartographer. To produce it, Matherly sent ping requests on August 2 to every IP address on the Internet and plotted the positive responses. There’s nothing shady or illegal about this; pings are simply network utilities which transmit an echo-request message to an IP address.

It took him just five hours to collect the data, but a further 12 to generate the image. Matherly notes on reddit that his ping requests would only reach devices that are directly connected to the Internet, such as routers. However, he has sometimes picked up smart phones.

Meat is a nasty business, filled with blood, guts and, yes, shit. While there’s nothing in the U.S. today that matches the hellish conditions described in Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle at the turn of the last century, there is no avoiding the fact that if we want to eat meat, we need to do things that are stomach-churning for the average person: kill things, cut them up, pack the pieces into containers and ship them out. 

We’ve all done an excellent job of hiding this process from our daily lives. In the time we’ve moved out of the country and into cities and suburbs (in 1910, 72 percent of Americans lived in rural areas; in 2010, only 16 percent did), we’ve both literally and emotionally distanced ourselves from the provenance of our dinners. 

In her book on the history of meat production in the U.S., In Meat We Trust, Maureen Ogle notes that as early as 1870s, city dwellers were desperate to get the dirty business of the slaughterhouse off their cobblestone streets. And as cities became less industrialized and more “refined,” the sight and smell of slaughter became even less tolerable. 

So we drove meat production into the hinterlands, in the process encouraging the growth of massive meat conglomerates that did much more than simply process: They grew, slaughtered, processed, shipped and marketed. 

To keep up with demand, they used all the resources they could marshall to become ever more efficient at these tasks. In 2010, we consumed 34,156,000 metric tons of the stuff total. Per person, we average 270.7 pounds of meat per year, well above the world average of 102.5 pounds and second only to tiny Luxembourg. 

Can Mass Meat Be Both Cheap and Safe?

Meat is a nasty business, filled with blood, guts and, yes, shit. While there’s nothing in the U.S. today that matches the hellish conditions described in Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle at the turn of the last century, there is no avoiding the fact that if we want to eat meat, we need to do things that are stomach-churning for the average person: kill things, cut them up, pack the pieces into containers and ship them out.

We’ve all done an excellent job of hiding this process from our daily lives. In the time we’ve moved out of the country and into cities and suburbs (in 1910, 72 percent of Americans lived in rural areas; in 2010, only 16 percent did), we’ve both literally and emotionally distanced ourselves from the provenance of our dinners.

In her book on the history of meat production in the U.S., In Meat We Trust, Maureen Ogle notes that as early as 1870s, city dwellers were desperate to get the dirty business of the slaughterhouse off their cobblestone streets. And as cities became less industrialized and more “refined,” the sight and smell of slaughter became even less tolerable.

So we drove meat production into the hinterlands, in the process encouraging the growth of massive meat conglomerates that did much more than simply process: They grew, slaughtered, processed, shipped and marketed.

To keep up with demand, they used all the resources they could marshall to become ever more efficient at these tasks. In 2010, we consumed 34,156,000 metric tons of the stuff total. Per person, we average 270.7 pounds of meat per year, well above the world average of 102.5 pounds and second only to tiny Luxembourg.

Can Mass Meat Be Both Cheap and Safe?