Camp Lejeune and the U.S. Military’s Polluted Legacy

Camp Lejeune, in Jacksonville, North Carolina, is a toxic paradox, a place where young men and women were poisoned while in the service of their nation. They swore to defend this land, and the land made them sick. 

And there are hundreds of Camp Lejeunes across the country, military sites contaminated with all manner of pollutants, from chemical weapon graveyards to vast groundwater deposits of gasoline. 

Soldiers know they might be felled by a sniper’s bullet in Baghdad or a roadside bomb in the gullies of Afghanistan. They might even expect it. 

But waterborne carcinogens are not an enemy whose ambush they prepare for.

That toxic enemy is far more prevalent than most American suspect, not to mention far more intractable. 

That the Department of Defense is the world’s worst polluter is a refrain one often hears from environmentalists, who have long-standing, unsurprising gripes with the military-industrial complex. 

But politics aside, the greenies have a convincing point. 

Dive into the numbers, as I did, and the Pentagon starts to make Koch Industries look like an organic farm.

Camp Lejeune and the U.S. Military’s Polluted Legacy

Camp Lejeune, in Jacksonville, North Carolina, is a toxic paradox, a place where young men and women were poisoned while in the service of their nation. They swore to defend this land, and the land made them sick.

And there are hundreds of Camp Lejeunes across the country, military sites contaminated with all manner of pollutants, from chemical weapon graveyards to vast groundwater deposits of gasoline.

Soldiers know they might be felled by a sniper’s bullet in Baghdad or a roadside bomb in the gullies of Afghanistan. They might even expect it.

But waterborne carcinogens are not an enemy whose ambush they prepare for.

That toxic enemy is far more prevalent than most American suspect, not to mention far more intractable.

That the Department of Defense is the world’s worst polluter is a refrain one often hears from environmentalists, who have long-standing, unsurprising gripes with the military-industrial complex.

But politics aside, the greenies have a convincing point.

Dive into the numbers, as I did, and the Pentagon starts to make Koch Industries look like an organic farm.

braiker:

hollybailey:


A Japanese zoo has taken the catwalk to a wild new level, using some of its fiercest inhabitants to rip and claw jeans to a fashionably distressed look. The facility northeast of Tokyo has unveiled “Zoo Jeans”, styled by the fangs and claws of lions, tigers and bears.

Okay: Japan Zoo makes wild fashion statement with lion-ripped jeans (via Yahoo News)

Japan, man. Japan. 

braiker:

hollybailey:

A Japanese zoo has taken the catwalk to a wild new level, using some of its fiercest inhabitants to rip and claw jeans to a fashionably distressed look. The facility northeast of Tokyo has unveiled “Zoo Jeans”, styled by the fangs and claws of lions, tigers and bears.

Okay: Japan Zoo makes wild fashion statement with lion-ripped jeans (via Yahoo News)

Japan, man. Japan. 

NASA 360: 
45 years ago Neil Armstrong took that small step onto the surface of our moon forever changing the course of history. Now, NASA is on a new Path to Mars. 
In fact, the first humans who will step foot on Mars are already walking the Earth today.

NASA 360: 

45 years ago Neil Armstrong took that small step onto the surface of our moon forever changing the course of history. Now, NASA is on a new Path to Mars. 


In fact, the first humans who will step foot on Mars are already walking the Earth today.

fastcompany:

Bee hives are a little terrifying. Colonies have 20,000 to 60,000 bees, all of whom beat their wings 200 times per second. It’s amazing, then, that videographer-photographer Michael Sutton, was only stung three times while shooting his high-speed short, Apis Mellifera: Honey Bee.
Watch>

fastcompany:

Bee hives are a little terrifying. Colonies have 20,000 to 60,000 bees, all of whom beat their wings 200 times per second. It’s amazing, then, that videographer-photographer Michael Sutton, was only stung three times while shooting his high-speed short, Apis Mellifera: Honey Bee.

Watch>

nprchives:

The last of the Ramones, Tommy, died this past weekend

Music critic Milo Miles reviewed the Ramones’ last tour in 1996. He summed up how many fans felt about the band, 

"…they were perfectly dopey, delightful, and defiant to the end…None of it—-the mosh pit, the crowd, the kissers—-would’ve been the same without the Ramones.” 

Found by library intern Kimberly Springer. Original airdate 02/22/1996. Illustration courtesy of Mike Licht, Flickr.

Derek Jeter tribute video? But why?

(Source: youtube.com)

apsies:

King said in an interview that this photograph was taken as he tried to explain to his daughter Yolanda why she could not go to Funtown, a whites-only amusement park in Atlanta. King claims to have been tongue-tied when speaking to her. “One of the most painful experiences I have ever faced was to see her tears when I told her Funtown was closed to colored children, for I realized the first dark cloud of inferiority had floated into her little mental sky.”

apsies:

King said in an interview that this photograph was taken as he tried to explain to his daughter Yolanda why she could not go to Funtown, a whites-only amusement park in Atlanta. King claims to have been tongue-tied when speaking to her. “One of the most painful experiences I have ever faced was to see her tears when I told her Funtown was closed to colored children, for I realized the first dark cloud of inferiority had floated into her little mental sky.”

Nadine Gordimer, Powerful Anti-Apartheid Voice and Nobel Laureate, Dies at 90

South African Nobel Prize-winning author Nadine Gordimer, an uncompromising moralist who became one of the most powerful voices against the injustice of apartheid, has died at the age of 90, her family said on Monday. 

Gordimer, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1991, died peacefully at her Johannesburg home on Sunday evening in the presence of her children, Hugo and Oriane, a statement from the family said. “She cared most deeply about South Africa, its culture, its people and its on-going struggle to realize its new democracy,” the statement said.

Nadine Gordimer, Powerful Anti-Apartheid Voice and Nobel Laureate, Dies at 90

South African Nobel Prize-winning author Nadine Gordimer, an uncompromising moralist who became one of the most powerful voices against the injustice of apartheid, has died at the age of 90, her family said on Monday.

Gordimer, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1991, died peacefully at her Johannesburg home on Sunday evening in the presence of her children, Hugo and Oriane, a statement from the family said. “She cared most deeply about South Africa, its culture, its people and its on-going struggle to realize its new democracy,” the statement said.