blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC: In MoMA’s show of the fascinating Polish artist Alina Szapocnikow, who died young in 1973, my favorite works crossed over between art and design - like these “Belly Cushions”, from 1968, that she’d hoped to put into mass production. The “new” MoMA is sometimes accused of having a corporate ethos, but  with shows like this, of obscure, neglected figures from far points (from us) on the globe, I think it defeats such accusations. At the moment, the Modern has nothing crowd pleasing and easy on view. Oh, wait. There’s Munch’s “Scream”. (Image © The Estate of Alina Szapocznikow/Piotr Stanisławski/ADAGP, Paris) 
For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive. The Daily Pic, along with more global art news, can also be found on the Art Beast page at thedailybeast.com.

TL;DR: “belly cushions” 

blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC: In MoMA’s show of the fascinating Polish artist Alina Szapocnikow, who died young in 1973, my favorite works crossed over between art and design - like these “Belly Cushions”, from 1968, that she’d hoped to put into mass production. The “new” MoMA is sometimes accused of having a corporate ethos, but  with shows like this, of obscure, neglected figures from far points (from us) on the globe, I think it defeats such accusations. At the moment, the Modern has nothing crowd pleasing and easy on view. Oh, wait. There’s Munch’s “Scream”. (Image © The Estate of Alina Szapocznikow/Piotr Stanisławski/ADAGP, Paris)

For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive. The Daily Pic, along with more global art news, can also be found on the Art Beast page at thedailybeast.com.

TL;DR: “belly cushions”