Here’s an un-fun experiment: the next time your kid’s in the other room, sneak a peek at her science textbook. Chances are, it says evolution is just a theory and global warming is debatable. 

If you’re living in Louisiana or Tennessee, you may also want to check out what your kids’ teachers are discussing in class: Teachers in those states are now allowed to teach creationism along with evolution and to argue both sides of global warming - even over the objections of their school principals and superintendents. 

In 2013, nine anti-science bills were introduced in seven states, and legislators nationwide have filed about 50 bills in the past 10 years declaring evolution a “controversial” idea whose opposing side, creationism, must be taught in the interest of academic freedom. Though most of these efforts died in committee - as South Dakota’s did last week - some become law. 

It’s all being done under the guise of fairness: Missouri’s House Bill 1587, creeping toward a vote, would force principals and administrators to let teachers “help students understand, analyze, critique, and review in an objective manner the scientific strengths and scientific weaknesses of the theory of biological and hypotheses of chemical evolution.” 

The bill’s authors say it’ll help students “develop critical thinking skills, and respond appropriately and respectfully to differences of opinion about controversial issues, including biological and chemical evolution.” 

MORE: A Textbook Case of Anti-Science)

Here’s an un-fun experiment: the next time your kid’s in the other room, sneak a peek at her science textbook. Chances are, it says evolution is just a theory and global warming is debatable.

If you’re living in Louisiana or Tennessee, you may also want to check out what your kids’ teachers are discussing in class: Teachers in those states are now allowed to teach creationism along with evolution and to argue both sides of global warming - even over the objections of their school principals and superintendents.

In 2013, nine anti-science bills were introduced in seven states, and legislators nationwide have filed about 50 bills in the past 10 years declaring evolution a “controversial” idea whose opposing side, creationism, must be taught in the interest of academic freedom. Though most of these efforts died in committee - as South Dakota’s did last week - some become law.

It’s all being done under the guise of fairness: Missouri’s House Bill 1587, creeping toward a vote, would force principals and administrators to let teachers “help students understand, analyze, critique, and review in an objective manner the scientific strengths and scientific weaknesses of the theory of biological and hypotheses of chemical evolution.”

The bill’s authors say it’ll help students “develop critical thinking skills, and respond appropriately and respectfully to differences of opinion about controversial issues, including biological and chemical evolution.”

MORE: A Textbook Case of Anti-Science)