Forty-two years ago today, the successful execution of mission Apollo 11 allowed humans access to the Earth’s moon for the very first time. American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin explored the lunar wonderland, erecting the flag of the United States on its rocky surface. That week, Newsweek ran with the above cover—a grainy shot of mankind’s first steps on the moon. Here’s how our editors at the time summed up the moment: 

“The feat of Apollo 11 was, in fact, the culmination of centuries of painstakingly acquired knowledge; the realization of dreams and myths as old as man’s consciousness itself; a magnificent opportunity to look deeply into the origins of the moon, the earth, and perhaps the universe; an exciting portent of the future. But most of all, it was a demonstration of what man’s ingenuity and courage and will can achieve when mobilized to a grand design.”

[Newsweek; July 28, 1969]

Forty-two years ago today, the successful execution of mission Apollo 11 allowed humans access to the Earth’s moon for the very first time. American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin explored the lunar wonderland, erecting the flag of the United States on its rocky surface. That week, Newsweek ran with the above cover—a grainy shot of mankind’s first steps on the moon. Here’s how our editors at the time summed up the moment: 

“The feat of Apollo 11 was, in fact, the culmination of centuries of painstakingly acquired knowledge; the realization of dreams and myths as old as man’s consciousness itself; a magnificent opportunity to look deeply into the origins of the moon, the earth, and perhaps the universe; an exciting portent of the future. But most of all, it was a demonstration of what man’s ingenuity and courage and will can achieve when mobilized to a grand design.”

[Newsweek; July 28, 1969]