Meet Ursula Franklin. 

The 92-year-old metallurgist pioneered the field of archeometry, the science of dating archaeologically discovered bronzes, metals, and ceramics. 

Her research into spiking levels of radioactive strontium in baby teeth factored heavily into the U.S. government’s decision to institute a nuclear test ban. 

She delivered the Massey Lectures—an important, annual series of talks delivered by Canadian public intellectuals—in 1989, and she was the first woman to be named University Professor at the University of Toronto, the university’s highest position. 

She was also born in Munich in 1921, and was imprisoned in a Nazi work camp for the last 18 months of the war. 

I spoke to her recently by phone. It was a snowy day in Toronto, she said and she was happy to stay inside. “I’m here and ready and have a cup of tea and a pad of notes,” she told me, “and so I’m happy to meet you.”

Amazing Structure: A Conversation With Ursula Franklin - The Atlantic

Meet Ursula Franklin.

The 92-year-old metallurgist pioneered the field of archeometry, the science of dating archaeologically discovered bronzes, metals, and ceramics.

Her research into spiking levels of radioactive strontium in baby teeth factored heavily into the U.S. government’s decision to institute a nuclear test ban.

She delivered the Massey Lectures—an important, annual series of talks delivered by Canadian public intellectuals—in 1989, and she was the first woman to be named University Professor at the University of Toronto, the university’s highest position.

She was also born in Munich in 1921, and was imprisoned in a Nazi work camp for the last 18 months of the war.

I spoke to her recently by phone. It was a snowy day in Toronto, she said and she was happy to stay inside. “I’m here and ready and have a cup of tea and a pad of notes,” she told me, “and so I’m happy to meet you.”

Amazing Structure: A Conversation With Ursula Franklin - The Atlantic