Posts tagged Covers
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo

Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image).

We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 

(Source: Newsweek)

This week’s cover story! Newsweek senior writer Leah McGrath Goodman digs into one of the world’s most notorious tax shelters: 
"No bigger than Boston, the island of Jersey, 14 miles west of the Normandy coast, is now considered the go-to place for the brokering of tricky bank deals, low-to-no-tax schemes and a what-happens-in-Vegas-stays-in-Vegas attitude toward the affairs of its sophisticated, well-heeled clients. The mammoth Swiss trading firm Glencore Xstrata (of tax avoider, illicit Iran-dealer Marc Rich fame) and Brevan Howard Asset Management (one of Europe’s largest hedge funds) have both hung shingles in Jersey in recent years, with an island-based law firm handling Glencore’s $10 billion public float in London and Hong Kong." 
Illustration by Tim McDonagh. 

This week’s cover story! Newsweek senior writer Leah McGrath Goodman digs into one of the world’s most notorious tax shelters: 

"No bigger than Boston, the island of Jersey, 14 miles west of the Normandy coast, is now considered the go-to place for the brokering of tricky bank deals, low-to-no-tax schemes and a what-happens-in-Vegas-stays-in-Vegas attitude toward the affairs of its sophisticated, well-heeled clients. The mammoth Swiss trading firm Glencore Xstrata (of tax avoider, illicit Iran-dealer Marc Rich fame) and Brevan Howard Asset Management (one of Europe’s largest hedge funds) have both hung shingles in Jersey in recent years, with an island-based law firm handling Glencore’s $10 billion public float in London and Hong Kong." 

Illustration by Tim McDonagh

Newsweek Covers from Around the Globe

Newsweek Poland put Wojciech Cejrowski on its cover, an anti-gay media figure who has spoken out about homosexuals protesting in Savior Plaza on independence day. 

Newsweek Japan talks about the latest infertility treatment “In vitro activation (IVA)” introduced by Japanese doctors. 

Newsweek Pakistan on China’s cyber war.

Newsweek Korea on the old cannibalizing resources of the young.

Newsweek Espanol on the potential downfall of Sotheby’s.

Newsweek Japan's cover reads “Hopeless America: The Suicidal Superpower” #ouch

Newsweek Japan's cover reads “Hopeless America: The Suicidal Superpower” #ouch

This week’s cover: #WhatsNext?
A manifesto for the gay-rights movement:

This year, the cake mix company Betty Crocker donated custom cakes for the first same-sex marriages in Minnesota. At DC Comics, Batwoman is engaged to marry her longtime girlfriend. Ellen DeGeneres—only 15 years ago jeered as “Ellen Degenerate” for coming out—is the queen of daytime television, where she regularly mentions her wife, Portia de Rossi. She’s also a Cover Girl model—the official public face of the Girl Next Door.
You know you’ve won when the companies that sell to the mass market of middle America are hurrying to show that they’re friendly to your cause. But there are many other signs of victory for lesbians and gay men. Only 17 years ago, in 1996, the Defense of Marriage Act was passed to protect the country against “promiscuity, perversion, hedonism, narcissism, depravity, and sin,” as then-congressman Gerry Studds summarized what he’d heard during the hearings. Today, any such language would sink the career of a national politician.
Meanwhile, we are speeding toward full marriage rights for same-sex couples throughout the country. This past June, the Supreme Court declared that the federal government must recognize all state-sanctioned marriages, including same-sex marriages, and in a procedural move, flung open marriage’s doors to California’s same-sex couples as well. Last fall, the citizens of three states passed laws making it possible for same-sex couples to marry, while another two rejected attempts to ban or undo marriage equality. The total number of marriage-equality states is now 13—or 14 if you include New Mexico, where the most populous counties are currently performing such marriages. Realistically, advocates believe they can win another 10 states by 2016.
Increasingly, people will get a chance to see how ordinarily boring we are, reducing the stigma attached to coming out as gay.
The marriage equality fight isn’t over, by any means. The rest of the states, including those most hostile to gay rights, have constitutional or statutory bans on recognizing same-sex pairs. But the momentum is clear to all. Roughly 55 percent of Americans now say they favor legal marriage rights for same-sex couples. Evan Wolfson, founder and president of Freedom to Marry—the national group most involved in winning hearts, minds, legislation, and ballot measures (as opposed to court victories) on marriage equality—recently told me that he believes we will see full national marriage rights within a few years, “if we do the work,” as he always adds.
To understate the case, when we win full marriage rights nationwide, it will be a transformative moment, both practically and symbolically. Once our marriages are legally recognized everywhere in the country, lesbians, bisexuals, and gay men—and children just beginning to realize that they might be heading in our direction—will be socially legible as ordinary human beings with the same hopes and dreams as our neighbors. Increasingly, people will get a chance to see how ordinarily boring we are, reducing the stigma attached to coming out as gay. In short, winning marriage means that, more and more, we will have formal equality.
So then what? Should the coalition of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender people—the LGBT movement, for short—declare victory and disband? Once we can marry the person whom we love, are we done agitating for political change under the rainbow flag?
In a word, no. For starters, there are still policy areas beyond marriage to take care of. Among the more urgent: passing ENDA—the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, currently being marked up in the Senate—which would add sexual orientation and gender identity to the list of federally forbidden reasons for firing or refusing to hire or promote, a move supported by 80 percent of the nation; battling back against the problematic idea, promoted under the phrase “religious liberty,” that anyone with a religious reason for not wanting to treat LGBT folks as fully human should be excused from following anti-discrimination laws; warming up the cultural climate in American regions where attitudes toward us lag; and reaching out internationally to ask those still being disenfranchised and brutalized in other countries and cultures how we can best help.
But beyond these projects, there’s a much larger cultural question that deeply deserves our country’s attention. It has to do with gender: the way our culture, our politics, and our legal system treats femininity, masculinity, and everything in between.

Read the whole piece: What’s Next For The Gay Rights Movement, by E.J. Graff.

This week’s cover: #WhatsNext?

A manifesto for the gay-rights movement:

This year, the cake mix company Betty Crocker donated custom cakes for the first same-sex marriages in Minnesota. At DC Comics, Batwoman is engaged to marry her longtime girlfriend. Ellen DeGeneres—only 15 years ago jeered as “Ellen Degenerate” for coming out—is the queen of daytime television, where she regularly mentions her wife, Portia de Rossi. She’s also a Cover Girl model—the official public face of the Girl Next Door.

You know you’ve won when the companies that sell to the mass market of middle America are hurrying to show that they’re friendly to your cause. But there are many other signs of victory for lesbians and gay men. Only 17 years ago, in 1996, the Defense of Marriage Act was passed to protect the country against “promiscuity, perversion, hedonism, narcissism, depravity, and sin,” as then-congressman Gerry Studds summarized what he’d heard during the hearings. Today, any such language would sink the career of a national politician.

Meanwhile, we are speeding toward full marriage rights for same-sex couples throughout the country. This past June, the Supreme Court declared that the federal government must recognize all state-sanctioned marriages, including same-sex marriages, and in a procedural move, flung open marriage’s doors to California’s same-sex couples as well. Last fall, the citizens of three states passed laws making it possible for same-sex couples to marry, while another two rejected attempts to ban or undo marriage equality. The total number of marriage-equality states is now 13—or 14 if you include New Mexico, where the most populous counties are currently performing such marriages. Realistically, advocates believe they can win another 10 states by 2016.

Increasingly, people will get a chance to see how ordinarily boring we are, reducing the stigma attached to coming out as gay.

The marriage equality fight isn’t over, by any means. The rest of the states, including those most hostile to gay rights, have constitutional or statutory bans on recognizing same-sex pairs. But the momentum is clear to all. Roughly 55 percent of Americans now say they favor legal marriage rights for same-sex couples. Evan Wolfson, founder and president of Freedom to Marry—the national group most involved in winning hearts, minds, legislation, and ballot measures (as opposed to court victories) on marriage equality—recently told me that he believes we will see full national marriage rights within a few years, “if we do the work,” as he always adds.

To understate the case, when we win full marriage rights nationwide, it will be a transformative moment, both practically and symbolically. Once our marriages are legally recognized everywhere in the country, lesbians, bisexuals, and gay men—and children just beginning to realize that they might be heading in our direction—will be socially legible as ordinary human beings with the same hopes and dreams as our neighbors. Increasingly, people will get a chance to see how ordinarily boring we are, reducing the stigma attached to coming out as gay. In short, winning marriage means that, more and more, we will have formal equality.

So then what? Should the coalition of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender people—the LGBT movement, for short—declare victory and disband? Once we can marry the person whom we love, are we done agitating for political change under the rainbow flag?

In a word, no. For starters, there are still policy areas beyond marriage to take care of. Among the more urgent: passing ENDA—the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, currently being marked up in the Senate—which would add sexual orientation and gender identity to the list of federally forbidden reasons for firing or refusing to hire or promote, a move supported by 80 percent of the nation; battling back against the problematic idea, promoted under the phrase “religious liberty,” that anyone with a religious reason for not wanting to treat LGBT folks as fully human should be excused from following anti-discrimination laws; warming up the cultural climate in American regions where attitudes toward us lag; and reaching out internationally to ask those still being disenfranchised and brutalized in other countries and cultures how we can best help.

But beyond these projects, there’s a much larger cultural question that deeply deserves our country’s attention. It has to do with gender: the way our culture, our politics, and our legal system treats femininity, masculinity, and everything in between.

Read the whole piece: What’s Next For The Gay Rights Movement, by E.J. Graff.

America’s role in the world is steadily shrinking-and that’s nothing to celebrate.
For this week’s Newsweek cover story, “The Puny Superpower,” James P. Rubin says the diplomatic debacle over Syria reflects a profound transformation that appears to be taking place in American foreign policy. It’s a transformation that he fears we will regret. 
How do you think President Obama handled the Syria crisis this past week? Is America’s foreign influence waning?

America’s role in the world is steadily shrinking-and that’s nothing to celebrate.

For this week’s Newsweek cover story, “The Puny Superpower,” James P. Rubin says the diplomatic debacle over Syria reflects a profound transformation that appears to be taking place in American foreign policy. It’s a transformation that he fears we will regret. 

How do you think President Obama handled the Syria crisis this past week? Is America’s foreign influence waning?

luckypeach:

These are the covers of Lucky Peach 8: The Gender Issue.
Betwixt these two covers we fumble with issues of gender like unsure 8th graders cautiously groping each other in the sparkle of a disco ball as a slow jam plays at the school dance. Ben Shewry talks about being a dad. Alice Waters talks about being a chef. Bourdain drops some lovely fiction. A lady named Poochie uses a lot of strong language. Sequential hermaphroditism is discussed. 
You can buy it from us here. You should probably subscribe so that you don’t miss any future issues, right? Do that here.
Stay cool & remember to use sunscreen.

luckypeach:

These are the covers of Lucky Peach 8: The Gender Issue.

Betwixt these two covers we fumble with issues of gender like unsure 8th graders cautiously groping each other in the sparkle of a disco ball as a slow jam plays at the school dance. Ben Shewry talks about being a dad. Alice Waters talks about being a chef. Bourdain drops some lovely fiction. A lady named Poochie uses a lot of strong language. Sequential hermaphroditism is discussed.

You can buy it from us here. You should probably subscribe so that you don’t miss any future issues, right? Do that here.

Stay cool & remember to use sunscreen.

Our cover story this week profiles Jill Abramson, NYT executive editor. Check out a preview of “Good Jill, Bad Jill: The Queen of The New York Times,” (and see how a meanie Politico story made her cry): 

April was an unusual, if not the cruelest, month for New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson, who in September will mark two years on the job. On Monday afternoon, April 15, Abramson—who, at 59, is the first woman to serve as top editor in the Times’s 160-year history—had barely begun savoring the four Pulitzer Prizes that her staff had just won (this year’s biggest haul, by far, for any journalistic outlet) when the Boston Marathon bombings occurred. Pulling an all-nighter at one point in the third-floor newsroom of the Times’s Renzo Piano-designed Manhattan skyscraper, she presided over a breathless week of “flooding the zone” (as one of her predecessors, Howell Raines, liked to say), while her reporters and editors managed to avoid the sort of embarrassing errors committed by The Associated Press, CNN, and even the Times Co.-owned Boston Globe.Then, the night of April 23, Politico—the Washington trade paper that aims to “drive the conversation”—published a story suggesting that Abramson’s young editorship was already a failure. Quoting anonymous former and current Times employees, Politico claimed she was widely considered “stubborn,” “condescending,” “difficult to work with,” “unreasonable,” “impossible,” “disengaged,” and “uncaring”—“on the verge of losing the support of the newsroom.” One staffer confided to media reporter Dylan Byers: “The Times is leaderless right now ¬ Jill is very, very unpopular.

Read “Good Jill, Bad Jill” - Newsweek
ZoomInfo
Our cover story this week profiles Jill Abramson, NYT executive editor. Check out a preview of “Good Jill, Bad Jill: The Queen of The New York Times,” (and see how a meanie Politico story made her cry): 

April was an unusual, if not the cruelest, month for New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson, who in September will mark two years on the job. On Monday afternoon, April 15, Abramson—who, at 59, is the first woman to serve as top editor in the Times’s 160-year history—had barely begun savoring the four Pulitzer Prizes that her staff had just won (this year’s biggest haul, by far, for any journalistic outlet) when the Boston Marathon bombings occurred. Pulling an all-nighter at one point in the third-floor newsroom of the Times’s Renzo Piano-designed Manhattan skyscraper, she presided over a breathless week of “flooding the zone” (as one of her predecessors, Howell Raines, liked to say), while her reporters and editors managed to avoid the sort of embarrassing errors committed by The Associated Press, CNN, and even the Times Co.-owned Boston Globe.Then, the night of April 23, Politico—the Washington trade paper that aims to “drive the conversation”—published a story suggesting that Abramson’s young editorship was already a failure. Quoting anonymous former and current Times employees, Politico claimed she was widely considered “stubborn,” “condescending,” “difficult to work with,” “unreasonable,” “impossible,” “disengaged,” and “uncaring”—“on the verge of losing the support of the newsroom.” One staffer confided to media reporter Dylan Byers: “The Times is leaderless right now ¬ Jill is very, very unpopular.

Read “Good Jill, Bad Jill” - Newsweek
ZoomInfo

Our cover story this week profiles Jill Abramson, NYT executive editor. Check out a preview of “Good Jill, Bad Jill: The Queen of The New York Times,” (and see how a meanie Politico story made her cry): 

April was an unusual, if not the cruelest, month for New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson, who in September will mark two years on the job. On Monday afternoon, April 15, Abramson—who, at 59, is the first woman to serve as top editor in the Times’s 160-year history—had barely begun savoring the four Pulitzer Prizes that her staff had just won (this year’s biggest haul, by far, for any journalistic outlet) when the Boston Marathon bombings occurred. Pulling an all-nighter at one point in the third-floor newsroom of the Times’s Renzo Piano-designed Manhattan skyscraper, she presided over a breathless week of “flooding the zone” (as one of her predecessors, Howell Raines, liked to say), while her reporters and editors managed to avoid the sort of embarrassing errors committed by The Associated Press, CNN, and even the Times Co.-owned Boston Globe.

Then, the night of April 23, Politico—the Washington trade paper that aims to “drive the conversation”—published a story suggesting that Abramson’s young editorship was already a failure. Quoting anonymous former and current Times employees, Politico claimed she was widely considered “stubborn,” “condescending,” “difficult to work with,” “unreasonable,” “impossible,” “disengaged,” and “uncaring”—“on the verge of losing the support of the newsroom.” One staffer confided to media reporter Dylan Byers: “The Times is leaderless right now ¬ Jill is very, very unpopular.

Read “Good Jill, Bad Jill” - Newsweek

This week’s cover features two photographs, side-by-side, of George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin with the coverline: “The Enduring Rift.”
For the cover story, President Obama’s former spiritual advisor, Joshua Dubois, weighs in with an essay that draws both on his personal feelings on the subject and on the thoughts of others. He begins by talking about a feeling of dread and anxiety and fear—not unlike what many felt after 9/11—after the trial. African-Americans, he says, may have a renewed sense of fear, worrying especially that their children could be shot by vigilantes with no legal ramifications. Some white people, he says, might see the case on a more micro-level, and focus just on the particulars of this incident, but he encourages them to step back and see the bigger picture and imagine how the situation must feel for many black people, who remember the stories of people like Emmett Till all too well. He speaks with Congressman John Lewis, a civil rights leader, as well as writer and poet Maya Angelou; and also emphasizes the need for forgiveness.
It’s online now, and you can read it for free in its entirety. Use the tag ‘The Enduring Rift’ to discuss it on tumblr. 

This week’s cover features two photographs, side-by-side, of George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin with the coverline: “The Enduring Rift.”

For the cover story, President Obama’s former spiritual advisor, Joshua Dubois, weighs in with an essay that draws both on his personal feelings on the subject and on the thoughts of others. He begins by talking about a feeling of dread and anxiety and fear—not unlike what many felt after 9/11—after the trial. African-Americans, he says, may have a renewed sense of fear, worrying especially that their children could be shot by vigilantes with no legal ramifications. Some white people, he says, might see the case on a more micro-level, and focus just on the particulars of this incident, but he encourages them to step back and see the bigger picture and imagine how the situation must feel for many black people, who remember the stories of people like Emmett Till all too well. He speaks with Congressman John Lewis, a civil rights leader, as well as writer and poet Maya Angelou; and also emphasizes the need for forgiveness.

It’s online now, and you can read it for free in its entirety. Use the tag ‘The Enduring Rift’ to discuss it on tumblr.