Posts tagged Culture
Lots of people are angry about FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler’s Internet “fast lane” proposal that would let Internet service providers charge Web services for priority access to consumers.
But one Web hosting service called NeoCities isn’t just writing letters to the FCC. Instead, the company found the FCC’s internal IP address range and throttled all connections to 28.8Kbps speeds.
"Since the FCC seems to have no problem with this idea, I’ve (through correspondence) gotten access to the FCC’s internal IP block, and throttled all connections from the FCC to 28.8kbps modem speeds on the Neocities.org front site, and I’m not removing it until the FCC pays us for the bandwidth they’ve been wasting instead of doing their jobs protecting us from the ‘keep America’s internet slow and expensive forever’ lobby," NeoCities creator Kyle Drake wrote yesterday.
Web host gives FCC a 28.8Kbps slow lane in net neutrality protest | Ars Technica

Lots of people are angry about FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler’s Internet “fast lane” proposal that would let Internet service providers charge Web services for priority access to consumers.

But one Web hosting service called NeoCities isn’t just writing letters to the FCC. Instead, the company found the FCC’s internal IP address range and throttled all connections to 28.8Kbps speeds.

"Since the FCC seems to have no problem with this idea, I’ve (through correspondence) gotten access to the FCC’s internal IP block, and throttled all connections from the FCC to 28.8kbps modem speeds on the Neocities.org front site, and I’m not removing it until the FCC pays us for the bandwidth they’ve been wasting instead of doing their jobs protecting us from the ‘keep America’s internet slow and expensive forever’ lobby," NeoCities creator Kyle Drake wrote yesterday.

Web host gives FCC a 28.8Kbps slow lane in net neutrality protest | Ars Technica

When I heard that my 21-year-old son, a student at Harvard, had been stopped by New York City police on more than one occasion during the brief summer he spent as a Wall Street intern, I was angry. 

On one occasion, while wearing his best business suit, he was forced to lie face-down on a filthy sidewalk because—well, let’s be honest about it, because of the color of his skin. As an attorney and a college professor who teaches criminal justice classes, I knew that his constitutional rights had been violated. 

As a parent, I feared for his safety at the hands of the police—a fear that I feel every single day, whether he is in New York or elsewhere. 

Moreover, as the white father of an African-American son, I am keenly aware that I never face the suspicion and indignities that my son continuously confronts. In fact, all of the men among my African-American in-laws—and I literally mean every single one of them—can tell multiple stories of unjustified investigatory police stops of the sort that not a single one of my white male relatives has ever experienced. 

What I Learned About Stop-and-Frisk From Watching My Black Son - The Atlantic

When I heard that my 21-year-old son, a student at Harvard, had been stopped by New York City police on more than one occasion during the brief summer he spent as a Wall Street intern, I was angry.

On one occasion, while wearing his best business suit, he was forced to lie face-down on a filthy sidewalk because—well, let’s be honest about it, because of the color of his skin. As an attorney and a college professor who teaches criminal justice classes, I knew that his constitutional rights had been violated.

As a parent, I feared for his safety at the hands of the police—a fear that I feel every single day, whether he is in New York or elsewhere.

Moreover, as the white father of an African-American son, I am keenly aware that I never face the suspicion and indignities that my son continuously confronts. In fact, all of the men among my African-American in-laws—and I literally mean every single one of them—can tell multiple stories of unjustified investigatory police stops of the sort that not a single one of my white male relatives has ever experienced.

What I Learned About Stop-and-Frisk From Watching My Black Son - The Atlantic

Lady Gaga’s Charity Spent Ten Times More on Social Media Than Charity Its First Year

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lady Gaga’s album-themed charity only gave out $5,000 in grants in 2012, after spending $1.85 million on lawyer, PR and social media fees. As the New York Post gleefully reported Wednesday, the Born This Way Foundation’s tax filings show several five- and six-figure fees for things like legal costs ($406,552), publicity ($58,678), social media ($50,000) and “philanthropic consulting” ($150,000). The tax forms don’t, however, say where the funds came from — and in 2011 Gaga announced that she would front the bulk of the money for the foundation when it launched the next year.

Lady Gaga’s Charity Spent Ten Times More on Social Media Than Charity Its First Year

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lady Gaga’s album-themed charity only gave out $5,000 in grants in 2012, after spending $1.85 million on lawyer, PR and social media fees. As the New York Post gleefully reported Wednesday, the Born This Way Foundation’s tax filings show several five- and six-figure fees for things like legal costs ($406,552), publicity ($58,678), social media ($50,000) and “philanthropic consulting” ($150,000). The tax forms don’t, however, say where the funds came from — and in 2011 Gaga announced that she would front the bulk of the money for the foundation when it launched the next year.

Tween girls spend significant portions of their days plugged in to social media, sharing, posting, liking and following content that may or may not be suitable, often out of parents’ reach. These girls are exposed to 8-12 hours of media a day and 91% of 12-13 year olds have Internet access and 72% have mobile access. — Sex and the Single Tween. 

Tween girls spend significant portions of their days plugged in to social media, sharing, posting, liking and following content that may or may not be suitable, often out of parents’ reach. These girls are exposed to 8-12 hours of media a day and 91% of 12-13 year olds have Internet access and 72% have mobile access. — Sex and the Single Tween

(Source: newsweek)