Posts tagged Facebook
Catching a glimpse of the puppet masters who play with the data trails we leave online is always disorienting. And yet there’s something new-level creepy about a recent study that shows Facebook manipulated what users saw when they logged into the site as a way to study how it would affect their moods. But why? 

Psychologists do all kinds of mood research and behavior studies. What made this study, which quickly stirred outrage, feel so wrong? Even Susan Fiske, the professor of psychology at Princeton University who edited the study for Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of America, had doubts when the research first crossed her desk. “I was concerned,” she told me in a phone interview, “until I queried the authors and they said their local institutional review board had approved it—and apparently on the grounds that Facebook apparently manipulates people’s News Feeds all the time… I understand why people have concerns. I think their beef is with Facebook, really, not the research.” 

Even the Editor of Facebook’s Mood Study Thought It Was Creepy - Adrienne LaFrance - The Atlantic

Catching a glimpse of the puppet masters who play with the data trails we leave online is always disorienting. And yet there’s something new-level creepy about a recent study that shows Facebook manipulated what users saw when they logged into the site as a way to study how it would affect their moods. But why?

Psychologists do all kinds of mood research and behavior studies. What made this study, which quickly stirred outrage, feel so wrong? Even Susan Fiske, the professor of psychology at Princeton University who edited the study for Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of America, had doubts when the research first crossed her desk. “I was concerned,” she told me in a phone interview, “until I queried the authors and they said their local institutional review board had approved it—and apparently on the grounds that Facebook apparently manipulates people’s News Feeds all the time… I understand why people have concerns. I think their beef is with Facebook, really, not the research.”

Even the Editor of Facebook’s Mood Study Thought It Was Creepy - Adrienne LaFrance - The Atlantic

It’s no secret that teenagers can be pretty stupid about their social media habits, and this also seems to be true for kids that may be street smart. Some 103 alleged gang members were indicted on Wednesday in what authorities have called the largest gang takedown in New York City’s history, a takedown largely made possible by a long trail of incriminating Facebook messages the young suspects left behind. 

The Kids Arrested in the Largest Gang Bust in NYC History Got Caught Because of Facebook

It’s no secret that teenagers can be pretty stupid about their social media habits, and this also seems to be true for kids that may be street smart. Some 103 alleged gang members were indicted on Wednesday in what authorities have called the largest gang takedown in New York City’s history, a takedown largely made possible by a long trail of incriminating Facebook messages the young suspects left behind.

The Kids Arrested in the Largest Gang Bust in NYC History Got Caught Because of Facebook

One sunny day in March, Gagan Biyani, the young and hugely ambitious CEO of Sprig—a company so new you probably have never heard of it—stepped into the main conference room at 2550 Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, California. Here, inside this nondescript Silicon Valley office, everything was about to change for Biyani, and his small company.
He was here to pitch his business plan to Greylock Partners. The room is ordinary—a white board, table, some chairs—but through the eyes of a fledgling CEO, it becomes transformed.
“Coming in, the first person I see is Reid, right?… And then David is over here; Aneel is there,” Biyani says breathlessly. “It was the biggest moment of my life.”
Gathered here on that day were some of the most powerful venture capitalists in the valley: David Sze, Aneel Bhusri, Reid Hoffman and every other partner at Greylock.
These are the guys who backed Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pandora, Dropbox, Airbnb—at a time when they were not much bigger than Sprig. For a striving founder of a startup, pitching your business plan here is a bit like being a rookie pitcher stepping onto the mound at Yankee Stadium—with Babe Ruth walking up to the plate.
Out of thousands of business plans Greylock sees each year, only 20 or so make it to a full partnership meeting. Of those, only half get funded. Biyani was determined to show that Sprig was worthy. But more than just his shot at the big leagues, what Biyani got that day was an up-close look at how Greylock picks its bets.
How Greylock Partners Finds the Next Facebook

One sunny day in March, Gagan Biyani, the young and hugely ambitious CEO of Sprig—a company so new you probably have never heard of it—stepped into the main conference room at 2550 Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, California. Here, inside this nondescript Silicon Valley office, everything was about to change for Biyani, and his small company.

He was here to pitch his business plan to Greylock Partners. The room is ordinary—a white board, table, some chairs—but through the eyes of a fledgling CEO, it becomes transformed.

“Coming in, the first person I see is Reid, right?… And then David is over here; Aneel is there,” Biyani says breathlessly. “It was the biggest moment of my life.”

Gathered here on that day were some of the most powerful venture capitalists in the valley: David Sze, Aneel Bhusri, Reid Hoffman and every other partner at Greylock.

These are the guys who backed Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pandora, Dropbox, Airbnb—at a time when they were not much bigger than Sprig. For a striving founder of a startup, pitching your business plan here is a bit like being a rookie pitcher stepping onto the mound at Yankee Stadium—with Babe Ruth walking up to the plate.

Out of thousands of business plans Greylock sees each year, only 20 or so make it to a full partnership meeting. Of those, only half get funded. Biyani was determined to show that Sprig was worthy. But more than just his shot at the big leagues, what Biyani got that day was an up-close look at how Greylock picks its bets.

How Greylock Partners Finds the Next Facebook

Hi, my name is…Slim Shady. No, really, my name is Slim Shady. Just kidding, my name is Mark (for those of you that don’t know me) and I live in a small town near the massive city of New York. I am currently 15 years old and I just finished freshman year in high school. I have remodeled this website in an attempt that perhaps some search engine will recognize it. I am trying to promote my new AOL Program, The Vader Fader, which you can download elsewhere on this site. It is a decent fader. If you have any comments about this website, the java applets on it, or the Vader Fader which I am trying to promote, please contact me. My E-Mail address is at the bottom of this page.

That’s how Mark Zuckerberg described himself on his first website, recently discovered.

[h/t hackernews]

parislemon:

Well played, Facebook. Glad to see something potentially massive come out of the Karma deal.

This is actually a pretty big deal. (Note: Don’t go running off to your Facebooks just yet. It’s only being tested with 1% of the user-base at this point. We are the 99%.)

parislemon:

Well played, Facebook. Glad to see something potentially massive come out of the Karma deal.

This is actually a pretty big deal. (Note: Don’t go running off to your Facebooks just yet. It’s only being tested with 1% of the user-base at this point. We are the 99%.)

If you’ve got an iPhone and use Facebook, go update your app. Facebook just rolled out a super fast new version—5.0—that is built as an actual iOS application, not HTML5.

If you’ve got an iPhone and use Facebook, go update your app. Facebook just rolled out a super fast new version—5.0—that is built as an actual iOS application, not HTML5.

On Mark’s birthday, in May 2006, I received an email from his administrative assistant telling me that it would be my job that day, along with all the other women in the office, to wear a T-shirt with Mark’s picture on it. The gender coding was clear: women were to declare allegiance to Mark, and men were to become Mark.
Katherine Losse had just dropped out of grad school at Johns Hopkins when she moved to Palo Alto and was hired as Facebook employee No. 51. In her new book, The Boy Kings, she describes Facebook as a men-driven fraternity full of immature and sexually inappropriate behavior. Plenty more here.
ryanbrown:

…262,597 people (regret having) read this.

File this one under things Facebook shouldn’t be broadcasting to our friends.

ryanbrown:

…262,597 people (regret having) read this.

File this one under things Facebook shouldn’t be broadcasting to our friends.