Posts tagged Feminism
When Women Refuse is a Tumblr collecting stories of violence inflicted on women who reject sexual advances. The Tumblr came to be over the weekend following the UCSB shootings carried out by Elliot Rodger, and the #YesAllWomen conversation it triggered, first on social media. 
[visualization: Tweets with ‘#yesallwomen’ by Twitter’s Simon Rogers. When Women Refuse was created by Deanna Zandt, and is curated by many, including our own social media editor Lainna Fader]

When Women Refuse is a Tumblr collecting stories of violence inflicted on women who reject sexual advances. 

The Tumblr came to be over the weekend following the UCSB shootings carried out by Elliot Rodger, and the #YesAllWomen conversation it triggered, first on social media. 

[visualization: Tweets with ‘#yesallwomen’ by Twitter’s Simon Rogers. When Women Refuse was created by Deanna Zandt, and is curated by many, including our own social media editor Lainna Fader]

jonbershad:

newsweek:


We have four years in college. Well, most of us at least. Only four short years to attain the thing that is most essential in securing our futures.
That’s right ladies, four years to find a husband. Every true woman knows how vital it is to find the right brilliant babe to father their children and replenish their bank accounts. A Southern belle is nothing but a pretty face and pearls without a man to eat her cooking and appreciate her cleaning.
So ladies, the clock is ticking and the hunnies are being taken at an alarmingly fast pace. Our expiration dates are fast approaching. To help you find that special someone, I’ve laid out step-by-step directions for how to secure your husband and consequentially, your future.

[h/t Zoe Schlanger]
Tumblr, please confirm this is satire?!

Newsweek, I’m pretty sure the column she wrote last week proves this to be a joke. It’s all about how great it is that kids nowadays don’t have to get married so early.


An update! This appears to be satire. Read above.
Thank you, Internet (specifically Jon)! You’ve restored our faith in our generation. Happy weekend to all! 

jonbershad:

newsweek:

We have four years in college. Well, most of us at least. Only four short years to attain the thing that is most essential in securing our futures.

That’s right ladies, four years to find a husband. Every true woman knows how vital it is to find the right brilliant babe to father their children and replenish their bank accounts. A Southern belle is nothing but a pretty face and pearls without a man to eat her cooking and appreciate her cleaning.

So ladies, the clock is ticking and the hunnies are being taken at an alarmingly fast pace. Our expiration dates are fast approaching. To help you find that special someone, I’ve laid out step-by-step directions for how to secure your husband and consequentially, your future.

[h/t Zoe Schlanger]

Tumblr, please confirm this is satire?!

Newsweek, I’m pretty sure the column she wrote last week proves this to be a joke. It’s all about how great it is that kids nowadays don’t have to get married so early.

An update! This appears to be satire. Read above.

Thank you, Internet (specifically Jon)! You’ve restored our faith in our generation. Happy weekend to all! 

If feminism has taught us anything, it is that women can choose, if they wish, to be demure (like Kate), bossy (like Madame Gu), or even, yes, to be spanked after lights-out.
Our Editor-In-Chief Tina Brown writes that “any discussion of a ‘woman’s role’ has become a cultural third rail” in this week’s editor’s letter. Our cover story, if you’ve perhaps missed it.

COVER STORY: Working Women’s Fantasies (Intro)

The writer and author Katie Roiphe takes the cover this week with the curious case of the modern woman’s retro bedroom fantasy.

Here are the first few paragraphs, click on through for the whole shebang. Read it, then let’s hear your thoughts (and we know you’ll have them!). We’ll see any and all you reblog or send through via a message.

If every era gets the sadist it deserves, it may not be surprising that we have ended up with Christian Grey, the hero of the runaway bestseller Fifty Shades of Grey. He is not twisted or frightening or in possession of a heart of darkness; he was abused as a child, a sadist Oprah could have dreamed up, or as E L James puts it, “Christian Grey has a sad side.” He is also extremely solicitous and apologetic for a sadist, always asking the book’s young heroine, Anastasia Steele, about every minute gradation of her feelings, and bringing her all kinds of creams and lotions to soothe her after spanking her. He is, in other words, the easiest difficult man of all time.

Why does this particular, watered-down, skinny-vanilla-latte version of sadomasochism have such cachet right now? Why have masses of women brought the book to the top of the New York Times bestseller list before it even hit the stores? Most likely it’s the happy convergence of the superficial transgression with comfortable archetypes, the blushing virgin and the whips. To a certain, I guess, rather large, population, it has a semipornographic glamour, a dangerous frisson of boundary crossing, but at the same time is delivering reassuringly safe, old-fashioned romantic roles. Reading Fifty Shades of Grey is no more risqué or rebellious or disturbing than, say, shopping for a pair of black boots or an arty asymmetrical dress at Barneys.

As it happens, the prevailing stereotype of the Fifty Shades of Grey reader, distilled in the condescending term “mommy porn,” as an older, suburban, possibly Midwestern woman isn’t entirely accurate: according to the publisher’s data, gleaned from Facebook, Google searches, and fan sites, more than half the women reading the book are in their 20s and 30s, and far more urban and blue state than the rampant caricature of them suggests.

The current vogue for domination is not confined to surreptitious iPad reading: in Lena Dunham’s acclaimed new series, Girls, about 20-somethings adrift in New York City, a similar desire for sexual submission has already emerged as a theme. The heroine’s pale hipsterish ersatz boyfriend jokes, “You modern career women, I know what you like …” and his idea, however awkwardly enacted, is that they like to be dominated. He says things like “You should never be anyone’s … slave, except mine,” and calls down from a window: “If you come up I’m going to tie you up and keep you here for three days. I’m just in that kind of mood.” She comes back from seeing him with bruises and sheepishly tells her gay college boyfriend at a bar, “I am seeing this guy and sometimes I let him hit me on the side of my body.”

Keep on reading.

Here’s this week’s cover, on newsstands and the iPad tomorrow morning. And the summary of the corresponding story: 

In an age where women are dominating - in the workplace, at school, at home - why are they seeking to be dominated in their love lives? Recent media portrayals have shown that a rising number of modern women fantasize about being overpowered, while studies are turning out statistics that bewilder feminists. New shows like HBO’s Girls and books like Fifty Shades of Grey are showcasing the often hidden desire for powerlessness. But why? Katie Roiphe examines the submissive yet empowered female in Newsweek. “It is perhaps inconvenient for feminism that the erotic imagination does not submit to politics, or even changing demographics,” she writes.

We haven’t seen the cover story yet, but color us intrigued! Let’s hear your pre-thoughts, tumblr.

Here’s this week’s cover, on newsstands and the iPad tomorrow morning. And the summary of the corresponding story: 

In an age where women are dominating - in the workplace, at school, at home - why are they seeking to be dominated in their love lives? Recent media portrayals have shown that a rising number of modern women fantasize about being overpowered, while studies are turning out statistics that bewilder feminists. New shows like HBO’s Girls and books like Fifty Shades of Grey are showcasing the often hidden desire for powerlessness. But why? Katie Roiphe examines the submissive yet empowered female in Newsweek. “It is perhaps inconvenient for feminism that the erotic imagination does not submit to politics, or even changing demographics,” she writes.

We haven’t seen the cover story yet, but color us intrigued! Let’s hear your pre-thoughts, tumblr.

Social media brought me here. Tumblr brought me here.
Young female activist Crystal Ogar, in a panel with Chelsea Clinton about how young women are using the Internet to lobby for social change. Shout-out to Tumblr as host to young feminism on the Internet! (See: The Daily Beast’s Women in the World Summit)

(Source: jessbennett, via cheatsheet)