Posts tagged Halloween

Newsweek’s Best Halloween Stories

Here are some of Newsweek’s best Halloween stories of the past few years. More to come!

1) The Hex Life of Hipsters — Millennials are finding solace (and some cool outfits) in that old black magic.

Favorite line:One 25-year-old Brooklynite who works in publishing recently complained that all her friends ever want to do these days is go to full moon ceremonies.”

2) Interview With a Vampyre’s Dentist — Father Sebastiaan makes the Rolex of fangs for the serious bloodsucker

Favorite line:A few minutes later, Dragata joins us in the Fang Van. By day, she’s a patent prosecution specialist for an international law firm in New York. By night, she often dances traditional Roma-style folk dances and is part of the local vampire community.” 

3) Tombstone TourismIn the last decade, people across the country have begun flocking to these old necropolises, lured by everything from photography workshops to movies

Favorite line: The Ramones, she points out, “are the only humans ever buried alive at Sleepy Hollow.”

4) Dressing Down for Halloween with Comedian Julie Gold“It’s fun to be someone else. Who the hell wants to be yourself?”  

Favorite exchange: 

“Darling, if you’re going to be this fucking character all night I’m not going,” Gold replies.

“Baby, I’m going to twerk you,” Halpern jokes.

5) The Mystery of the Halloween Candy Bowl — Why in the world would anyone choose a teeny lollipop over a big fat chocolate bar? It turns out that the psychology of picking candy is more complicated than “the bigger, the better.”

Favorite quote: “I’m suspecting that all future economists would go for the candy bar. Especially if they have brothers and sisters with whom they could trade candy afterwards.”

6) Pet Costumes Are Halloween’s New Cash Cow22 million Americans plan to dress up their pets this Halloween

Favorite quote: “Rats, rabbits, cats, anything that has four legs that’s big enough to put a costume on, people will come and try to dress it up.” 

wnyc:

Digital producer Stephen Nessen as He-Man; business editor Charlie Herman as a California Maritime Academy officer; news editor Lynn Kim as Tweety; culture editor Abbie Swanson as an admittedly “not PC” gypsy.
Happy Halloween from WNYC past and present!

Yes!
ZoomInfo
wnyc:

Digital producer Stephen Nessen as He-Man; business editor Charlie Herman as a California Maritime Academy officer; news editor Lynn Kim as Tweety; culture editor Abbie Swanson as an admittedly “not PC” gypsy.
Happy Halloween from WNYC past and present!

Yes!
ZoomInfo
wnyc:

Digital producer Stephen Nessen as He-Man; business editor Charlie Herman as a California Maritime Academy officer; news editor Lynn Kim as Tweety; culture editor Abbie Swanson as an admittedly “not PC” gypsy.
Happy Halloween from WNYC past and present!

Yes!
ZoomInfo
wnyc:

Digital producer Stephen Nessen as He-Man; business editor Charlie Herman as a California Maritime Academy officer; news editor Lynn Kim as Tweety; culture editor Abbie Swanson as an admittedly “not PC” gypsy.
Happy Halloween from WNYC past and present!

Yes!
ZoomInfo

wnyc:

Digital producer Stephen Nessen as He-Man; business editor Charlie Herman as a California Maritime Academy officer; news editor Lynn Kim as Tweety; culture editor Abbie Swanson as an admittedly “not PC” gypsy.

Happy Halloween from WNYC past and present!

Yes!

HALLOWEEN NEWS-BEASTIES. DURING THE AWKWARD YEARS.
Clockwise from left: Danielle Friedman, She-Ra-turned-web-editor, Abby Haglage, adorable pumpkin, ballerina science writer Casey Schwartz, and your tumblr team, a Rainbow Brite Jess Bennett and Brian Ries as the grim reaper.
ZoomInfo
HALLOWEEN NEWS-BEASTIES. DURING THE AWKWARD YEARS.
Clockwise from left: Danielle Friedman, She-Ra-turned-web-editor, Abby Haglage, adorable pumpkin, ballerina science writer Casey Schwartz, and your tumblr team, a Rainbow Brite Jess Bennett and Brian Ries as the grim reaper.
ZoomInfo
HALLOWEEN NEWS-BEASTIES. DURING THE AWKWARD YEARS.
Clockwise from left: Danielle Friedman, She-Ra-turned-web-editor, Abby Haglage, adorable pumpkin, ballerina science writer Casey Schwartz, and your tumblr team, a Rainbow Brite Jess Bennett and Brian Ries as the grim reaper.
ZoomInfo
HALLOWEEN NEWS-BEASTIES. DURING THE AWKWARD YEARS.
Clockwise from left: Danielle Friedman, She-Ra-turned-web-editor, Abby Haglage, adorable pumpkin, ballerina science writer Casey Schwartz, and your tumblr team, a Rainbow Brite Jess Bennett and Brian Ries as the grim reaper.
ZoomInfo
HALLOWEEN NEWS-BEASTIES. DURING THE AWKWARD YEARS.
Clockwise from left: Danielle Friedman, She-Ra-turned-web-editor, Abby Haglage, adorable pumpkin, ballerina science writer Casey Schwartz, and your tumblr team, a Rainbow Brite Jess Bennett and Brian Ries as the grim reaper.
ZoomInfo

HALLOWEEN NEWS-BEASTIES. DURING THE AWKWARD YEARS.

Clockwise from left: Danielle Friedman, She-Ra-turned-web-editor, Abby Haglage, adorable pumpkin, ballerina science writer Casey Schwartz, and your tumblr team, a Rainbow Brite Jess Bennett and Brian Ries as the grim reaper.

The Great Pumpkin had a lot going for it as a mythical fantasy figure – he arrived timed to holidays. That was the #1 criteria. The #2 criteria was that he gave something to the kids – according to Linus, The Great Pumpkin carried a bag of toys for all the children, just as the Easter Bunny left candy, Santa left gifts, and the Tooth Fairy left money.

But he lacked a couple other important attributes. For instance, he lacked necessary inherent contradictions between the human and the fantastical. Santa, for instance, had total omniscience – he knew whether we’d been bad or good – yet he couldn’t appear and disappear, he had to actually travel, by flying sleigh – and yet he still managed to hit every house in the world. These contradictions, apparently, get kids talking, thinking – and keep the fantasy figure alive in their minds. The Tooth Fairy, meanwhile, could magically appear, yet dealt in real human money.

Kids Who Wear Halloween Masks Come Home With More Candy

From an experiment described on NurtureShock:

Trick-or-treating children who came to the door were instructed to help themselves to the candy – but they were only allowed to take one piece.
Many kids took two pieces or more – even handfuls. Beamer’s team noticed a pattern. Kids who wore costumes that didn’t hide their true identity – such as costumes that didn’t use masks or other head covers – tended to take just one piece of candy. Kids whose costumes truly disguised their identity were grabbing extra. The costumes freed the children from the rules that that normal kids have to play by.

So for some kids, the researchers asked the children to tell them their names or addresses. This worked miracles – those kids then only took a single piece.

Then, the researchers tried a subtler trick – they placed a large mirror behind the bowl of candy. The kids only took one piece. Even kids wearing full-costumes.

It wasn’t until the kids identified themselves or literally saw themselves in the mirror, did they have an awareness that the kid underneath the costume was still the same kid. And the rules applied once more. 

The more you know…