Posts tagged Harvard
Earlier this month, digital rights activist and Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig launched Mayday PAC, a super political action committee aimed at reforming U.S. campaign finance laws. 

To date, the Super PAC has raised more than $1.2 million in pledges from 17,500 people. Through Mayday, Lessig hopes to turn the mechanism of corporate influence in politics against itself. “If we are effective,” he says, “we will reduce the power of money.” 

The goal, according to Lessig, is to raise a total of $12 million by the 2014 midterm elections. Several Silicon Valley billionaires have lined up to match all donations to the Super PAC. 

That money, Lessig hopes, will be used to elect five candidates as a sort of proof of concept—showing lawmakers and voters alike that the issue of money in politics does matter and can be influenced by everyday citizens. 

If successful, Lessig and his supporters plan to launch during the 2016 election a much larger campaign aimed at reversing recent laws that have granted corporations unprecedented political influence. 

Mayday PAC: The Super PAC Built to Destroy Super PACs

Earlier this month, digital rights activist and Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig launched Mayday PAC, a super political action committee aimed at reforming U.S. campaign finance laws.

To date, the Super PAC has raised more than $1.2 million in pledges from 17,500 people. Through Mayday, Lessig hopes to turn the mechanism of corporate influence in politics against itself. “If we are effective,” he says, “we will reduce the power of money.”

The goal, according to Lessig, is to raise a total of $12 million by the 2014 midterm elections. Several Silicon Valley billionaires have lined up to match all donations to the Super PAC.

That money, Lessig hopes, will be used to elect five candidates as a sort of proof of concept—showing lawmakers and voters alike that the issue of money in politics does matter and can be influenced by everyday citizens.

If successful, Lessig and his supporters plan to launch during the 2016 election a much larger campaign aimed at reversing recent laws that have granted corporations unprecedented political influence.

Mayday PAC: The Super PAC Built to Destroy Super PACs

This year’s Ivy League admissions totals are in. The 8.9 percent acceptance rate is impressively exclusive, but compared to landing a job at Wal-Mart, getting into the Ivy Leagues is a cakewalk.

Last year when Wal-Mart came to D.C. there were over 23,000 applications for 600 jobs. That’s an acceptance rate of 2.6%, twice as selective as Harvard’s and over five times as choosy as Cornell. 

Wal-Mart has a lower acceptance rate than Harvard

This year’s Ivy League admissions totals are in. The 8.9 percent acceptance rate is impressively exclusive, but compared to landing a job at Wal-Mart, getting into the Ivy Leagues is a cakewalk.

Last year when Wal-Mart came to D.C. there were over 23,000 applications for 600 jobs. That’s an acceptance rate of 2.6%, twice as selective as Harvard’s and over five times as choosy as Cornell.

Wal-Mart has a lower acceptance rate than Harvard

President Obama has broken his promises, and Romney-Ryan is our only hope for prosperity writes Harvard historian and Newsweek columnist Niall Ferguson in next week’s issue available with bells n’ whistles on iPad today or in glorious print at the newsstand on Monday. AND if you’re by a telly you can catch Niall talking Obama, Biden, Romney, Ryan and all things 2012 on CBS Face the Nation w/ Bob Schieffer later this morning at 10.30am.

President Obama has broken his promises, and Romney-Ryan is our only hope for prosperity writes Harvard historian and Newsweek columnist Niall Ferguson in next week’s issue available with bells n’ whistles on iPad today or in glorious print at the newsstand on Monday. AND if you’re by a telly you can catch Niall talking Obama, Biden, Romney, Ryan and all things 2012 on CBS Face the Nation w/ Bob Schieffer later this morning at 10.30am.

The Occupy movement has raised important questions about rising inequality, and about the terms of the bailout. I think that we continue to experience the political fallout from anger over the bailout—esp. the fact that it did not hold the banks to account. Nor did subsequent regulations resolve the problem of banks “too big to fail.” It is important to continue to keep these questions at the center of our politics.
We’re chatting live with Harvard’s Michael Sandel about capitalism and morality. Come join us.  (via cheatsheet)

cheatsheet:

Watch a young Barack Obama support Harvard Law professor Derek Bell in a speech at a diversity protest in 1990. (via Buzzfeed)

Young Obama sounds like Now Obama!