Posts tagged Journalism
newsbeastlabs:

Last month we published a package of stories marking the fortieth anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision. It had a few moving parts but I’ll just go over some of them briefly here.
How it started
This summer you probably heard the story about the last abortion clinic in Mississippi that was threatened to close due to stricter state laws. Allison Yarrow, who sat across from me at the time, was covering the story and it got us thinking: the line “The Last Abortion Clinic in Mississippi” is attention grabbing, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. That is to say, what you really want to know is how far are people away from their nearest clinic, regardless of state boundaries. One state may have five clinics but if they’re all in the southwest corner of the state and you live in the northeast corner, and your adjoining states have multiple clinics but only at their borders farthest from you, then you’ll have a hard time getting to a clinic, even if you had many in your state. To see where this might be the case and where access to services was compounded by new restrictive provisions (over 150 nationally in the past two years) we made as close to a comprehensive database as possible of every abortion clinic. Our goal was to see what parts of the country were farthest from a clinic. From start to finish, this process took about six months. 

Curious about “the process”? Read on.

newsbeastlabs:

Last month we published a package of stories marking the fortieth anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision. It had a few moving parts but I’ll just go over some of them briefly here.

How it started

This summer you probably heard the story about the last abortion clinic in Mississippi that was threatened to close due to stricter state laws. Allison Yarrow, who sat across from me at the time, was covering the story and it got us thinking: the line “The Last Abortion Clinic in Mississippi” is attention grabbing, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. That is to say, what you really want to know is how far are people away from their nearest clinic, regardless of state boundaries. One state may have five clinics but if they’re all in the southwest corner of the state and you live in the northeast corner, and your adjoining states have multiple clinics but only at their borders farthest from you, then you’ll have a hard time getting to a clinic, even if you had many in your state. To see where this might be the case and where access to services was compounded by new restrictive provisions (over 150 nationally in the past two years) we made as close to a comprehensive database as possible of every abortion clinic. Our goal was to see what parts of the country were farthest from a clinic. From start to finish, this process took about six months. 

Curious about “the process”? Read on.

  • Trudy:“The site is called LinxPDX; we don’t actually have articles. We have links to other articles.”
  • Craig:“Think of yourself less of a journalist and more of a linkalist.”
  • George:“But we can still write stories.”
  • Trudy:“In your free time you can write all the stories you want.”

"How Do I Get A Job In Journalism?"

This is a question we see come through the ol’ Ask box from time to time, and it’s never truly a very easy one to answer. Looking around the newsroom, our colleagues come from a wide array of backgrounds, and there’s not really a point A-to-point B path to become a journalist (other than, we suppose, going to J school, but even then who knows). 

David Carr’s doing a Reddit AMA right now and he just answered this question rather succinctly, so here you go:

The tools of journalism are in your hands and no one is going to give a damn about what is on your resume, they want to see what you have made with your own little fingies. Can you use Final Cut Pro? Have you created an Instagram that is about something besides a picture of your cat every time she rolls over? Is HTML 5 a foreign language to you? Is your social media presence dominated by a picture of your beer bong, or is it an RSS of interesting stuff that you add insight to? People who are doing hires will have great visibility into what you can actually do, what you care about and how you can express on any number of platforms.

via Reddit

newsbeastlabs:

For the holidays, we wanted to make the normal gift guide idea a little more interesting. The answer was a flow chart that narrows down the type of person you’re shopping for and then suggests appropriate gifts for their particular sub-culture. Lizzie Crocker and Isabel Wilkinson did a great job coming up with the categories like (Nostalgic Outdoorsman, The Closet ‘50 Shades’ Fan, Hipster Techie) and then Lizzie and I (Michael) put our heads together to make a (hopefully) witty flowchart. Our photo department headed by Marica Allert was also a huge help.
There’s nothing fancy under the hood. The only semi-trick was our Daily Beast font family Titling isn’t always too legible at smaller sizes on the web. To fix that, we made the blue circles in Illustrator and exported them as PNGs. To do the hovers, you duplicate the image below your main image like this and make sure your image container is only tall enough to show one at a time: 

To do the hover then, your CSS is something like .img-class:hover{ background-position: 0 -102px;} The benefit to this is you don’t load a second picture when you hover so there’s no delay. This is a pretty standard way of doing this so it’s nothing revolutionary but for some reason you still see a lot of sites that have delays on their image hovers that would be better off using this technique.
Why not make the flowchart interactive too?
We decided in favor of a static image for the flowchart as opposed to something interactive since I think the wittiness of flowcharts comes across in seeing how the possibilities flow from one another and the different results in choosing one adventure over another. Also, at the sake of sounding blasphemous, interactivity can be thought of as a last resort only when you can’t fit everything onto the screen at once, or doing so would work against a focused narrative. It’s much easier for readers to scan a page full of information and see how these options unfold, in my view, than it is for them to click 10+ times and only see the options that stem from their responses. 
-michael

Journalism nerds, rejoice! Here’s a look beneath the surface at how we put together our little gift guide flowchart interactive.

newsbeastlabs:

For the holidays, we wanted to make the normal gift guide idea a little more interesting. The answer was a flow chart that narrows down the type of person you’re shopping for and then suggests appropriate gifts for their particular sub-culture. Lizzie Crocker and Isabel Wilkinson did a great job coming up with the categories like (Nostalgic Outdoorsman, The Closet ‘50 Shades’ Fan, Hipster Techie) and then Lizzie and I (Michael) put our heads together to make a (hopefully) witty flowchart. Our photo department headed by Marica Allert was also a huge help.

There’s nothing fancy under the hood. The only semi-trick was our Daily Beast font family Titling isn’t always too legible at smaller sizes on the web. To fix that, we made the blue circles in Illustrator and exported them as PNGs. To do the hovers, you duplicate the image below your main image like this and make sure your image container is only tall enough to show one at a time: 

image

To do the hover then, your CSS is something like .img-class:hover{ background-position: 0 -102px;} The benefit to this is you don’t load a second picture when you hover so there’s no delay. This is a pretty standard way of doing this so it’s nothing revolutionary but for some reason you still see a lot of sites that have delays on their image hovers that would be better off using this technique.

Why not make the flowchart interactive too?

We decided in favor of a static image for the flowchart as opposed to something interactive since I think the wittiness of flowcharts comes across in seeing how the possibilities flow from one another and the different results in choosing one adventure over another. Also, at the sake of sounding blasphemous, interactivity can be thought of as a last resort only when you can’t fit everything onto the screen at once, or doing so would work against a focused narrative. It’s much easier for readers to scan a page full of information and see how these options unfold, in my view, than it is for them to click 10+ times and only see the options that stem from their responses. 

-michael

Journalism nerds, rejoice! Here’s a look beneath the surface at how we put together our little gift guide flowchart interactive.

newsbeastlabs:

Tracking the presidential groundgame
As the two presidential campaigns launch into their final throws, we wanted to see who had the biggest footprint of campaign headquarters across the country. The map above ran with the resulting story showing Obama with a large advantage, especially in swing states. We thought getting from idea to map / chart would be as easy as checking the candidates’ websites or calling their press offices to request a full list. Not quite.
Finding Romney’s offices
Governor Romney’s campaign didn’t get back to our requests so we dug into their website. Romney only had volunteer offices in 16 states, each of which has a web page and a map showing office locations. Here’s Ohio’s. The data that powers the map is visible if you look at the Javascript files that power it, so we copied the data sixteen states into one file and saved it. They were in JSON file format — but more on that later.
Finding Obamas’s offices
President Obama has offices in many more states than Romney so going state by state is more of a hassle and his campaign’s website doesn’t have the same convenient state-by-state maps. Instead, you input your zip code and it gives you a map of all locations within forty miles of you. 
Needless to say, getting a comprehensive list by canvassing the country in 40 mile chunks was out of the question. Digging again into the javascript that powers the website (aside: the Obama website has some slick ASCII art in their source code), their volunteer center finder works by sending out a query that looks like this http://offices.barackobama.com/postal_code/10011/ with your zip code making up the those last five digits. If you put that in your browser and hit return you’ll see the centers closest to the Daily Beast offices in Manhattan…. (Read more)

We’re excited to show-off our newest Tumblr: NewsBeast Labs! As we write in the description, we’ll be giving you a peak at notes and images from our ever-growing digital newsroom. So if you’re into journalism, maps, data, pretty colors, etc. you should definitely follow. 

newsbeastlabs:

Tracking the presidential groundgame

As the two presidential campaigns launch into their final throws, we wanted to see who had the biggest footprint of campaign headquarters across the country. The map above ran with the resulting story showing Obama with a large advantage, especially in swing states. We thought getting from idea to map / chart would be as easy as checking the candidates’ websites or calling their press offices to request a full list. Not quite.

Finding Romney’s offices

Governor Romney’s campaign didn’t get back to our requests so we dug into their website. Romney only had volunteer offices in 16 states, each of which has a web page and a map showing office locations. Here’s Ohio’s. The data that powers the map is visible if you look at the Javascript files that power it, so we copied the data sixteen states into one file and saved it. They were in JSON file format — but more on that later.

Finding Obamas’s offices

President Obama has offices in many more states than Romney so going state by state is more of a hassle and his campaign’s website doesn’t have the same convenient state-by-state maps. Instead, you input your zip code and it gives you a map of all locations within forty miles of you. 

Needless to say, getting a comprehensive list by canvassing the country in 40 mile chunks was out of the question. Digging again into the javascript that powers the website (aside: the Obama website has some slick ASCII art in their source code), their volunteer center finder works by sending out a query that looks like this http://offices.barackobama.com/postal_code/10011/ with your zip code making up the those last five digits. If you put that in your browser and hit return you’ll see the centers closest to the Daily Beast offices in Manhattan…. (Read more)

We’re excited to show-off our newest Tumblr: NewsBeast Labs! As we write in the description, we’ll be giving you a peak at notes and images from our ever-growing digital newsroom. So if you’re into journalism, maps, data, pretty colors, etc. you should definitely follow. 

We’ve got some cool news from the Department of the Future: NewsBeast is super proud to be launching our first Daily Beast Election Ad Tracker!
We’ve partnered with the fine folks at Super PAC App to help track political ads that air over the next 80 days until November 6th. Through our dashboard, you can watch and rate the political ads, read articles about the issues, and learn about the (oftentimes shadowy) groups that are producing these ads.
The end result: you’ll be more informed about all the messages screaming at your brain throughout the entirety of the 2012 election season.
So check it out. Download Super Pac App to your iPhone. Then go play around with the dashboard on the site. The more you know, the more informed you’ll be on election day.

We’ve got some cool news from the Department of the Future: NewsBeast is super proud to be launching our first Daily Beast Election Ad Tracker!

We’ve partnered with the fine folks at Super PAC App to help track political ads that air over the next 80 days until November 6th. Through our dashboard, you can watch and rate the political ads, read articles about the issues, and learn about the (oftentimes shadowy) groups that are producing these ads.

The end result: you’ll be more informed about all the messages screaming at your brain throughout the entirety of the 2012 election season.

So check it out. Download Super Pac App to your iPhone. Then go play around with the dashboard on the site. The more you know, the more informed you’ll be on election day.

fastcompany:

Stunning.
nickturse:

Some of the 648 Journalists murdered since 1992
Beats Covered by Victims *
5% Business
29% Corruption
20% Crime
9% Culture
15% Human Rights
45% Politics
2% Sports
23% War
(* May add up to more than 100 percent because more than one category applies in some cases.)
For more, on these heroic women and men, see Committee to Protect Journalists’ website.
ZoomInfo
fastcompany:

Stunning.
nickturse:

Some of the 648 Journalists murdered since 1992
Beats Covered by Victims *
5% Business
29% Corruption
20% Crime
9% Culture
15% Human Rights
45% Politics
2% Sports
23% War
(* May add up to more than 100 percent because more than one category applies in some cases.)
For more, on these heroic women and men, see Committee to Protect Journalists’ website.
ZoomInfo

fastcompany:

Stunning.

nickturse:

Some of the 648 Journalists murdered since 1992

Beats Covered by Victims *

5% Business

29% Corruption

20% Crime

9% Culture

15% Human Rights

45% Politics

2% Sports

23% War

(* May add up to more than 100 percent because more than one category applies in some cases.)

For more, on these heroic women and men, see Committee to Protect Journalists’ website.

From Narratively’s Kickstarter page:

New York is bigger and badder, weirder and sadder, and far more uplifting and intoxicating than the news headlines would have you believe. But too many of its stories are left untold. Narratively is changing that, and then we’ll do it in your city, too. We don’t care about the breaking news or the next big headline. Narratively is devoted exclusively to sharing New York’s untold stories — the rich, in-depth narratives that get at the heart of what this city’s all about.

Way into this.

New York City needs more storytelling platforms. Your city does too. We’ve got 24 days to help Narratively reach their $50,000 goal! Go go go go.

I timed the question believing the president was closing his remarks, because naturally I have no intention of interrupting the President of the United States.
Neil Munro, the “reporter” who interrupted the President during his immigration announcement in the Rose Garden. Hm. It smells like, uh, something kinda stinky in here! What is that?!

(Source: dailycaller.com)

shortformblog:

“For sure, he was killed because of his work as a reporter. Over his at least 17 years at the newspaper, he made a long list of enemies, many of whom I imagine would love to see him dead. But he denounced so many people and so much corruption that it is impossible to say who was behind his murder.” — O Estado do Maranhao state affairs editor Silvia Moscoso • Discussing the death of Decio Sa, one of his co-workers at the Brazilian newspaper. The political reporter was killed Monday night, gunned down while eating dinner. Brazil is a particularly dangerous part of the world for journalists — four journalists have been killed just this year alone, along with 21 since 1992.

Rest in peace, brother.