Posts tagged Love
Here’s a guy who’s 40-whatever and has maintained the purity and innocence of that prepubescent heart before your heart gets broke, and taken it through adulthood. You don’t maintain that living on earth; he lives up in the clouds. If he ever came down or got the girl, I think he’d die. That’s when you love—before you get burned, you don’t really have the ego that protects yourself.
Matthew McConaughey on his latest character, Mud—but really that’s Matthew McConaughey on love.

Taylor Swift Won't Go There

  • The Daily Beast:Do you see yourself settling down and getting married?
  • Taylor Swift:I have no idea. One thing I’ve learned about life and love, you have no idea what it’s going to throw at you. So I just really have no idea where I’m going to end up.
  • TDB:What qualities do you look for in a guy?
  • Taylor Swift:I don’t really look for anything. I don’t have a type. I don’t have a specific kind of human being. It’s just kind of an X-factor of sorts. Everybody I’ve ever dated has been a case-by-case situation. None of them have had any real similarities as far as how we met or what kind of relationship it was. I just try to operate based on spontaneity.
  • TDB:Do you get your heart broken more or do you break hearts?
  • Taylor Swift:I feel like I get my heart broken more than break hearts. I just kind of, I think that’s been more the case, for sure.
  • TDB:Are you currently in a relationship?
  • Taylor Swift:Don’t go there. C’mon.
  • TDB:I was just wondering.
  • Taylor Swift:I know you have to ask. But don’t ask.
Fleet Week has officially kicked off here in New York City, which means a combustion of hormones has hit our shores; flocks of men who’ve been out at sea for weeks (months!?) are commingling with residents of what sometimes seems like a man-starved city.
What better way to celebrate, as people who run a website full of stories, than sharing some of your tales of Fleet Week love connections!? 
If you want in, send us your stories of that time you met and fell for a sailor by filling out this Google form. Try and keep it somewhat clean, so we can publish it in its entirety, and let us know if you don’t want to remain anonymous.
We’ll be gathering the best of the bunch for a story on Fleet Week love connections.
OK, ladies and gents, time to kiss and tell.
ZoomInfo
Fleet Week has officially kicked off here in New York City, which means a combustion of hormones has hit our shores; flocks of men who’ve been out at sea for weeks (months!?) are commingling with residents of what sometimes seems like a man-starved city.
What better way to celebrate, as people who run a website full of stories, than sharing some of your tales of Fleet Week love connections!? 
If you want in, send us your stories of that time you met and fell for a sailor by filling out this Google form. Try and keep it somewhat clean, so we can publish it in its entirety, and let us know if you don’t want to remain anonymous.
We’ll be gathering the best of the bunch for a story on Fleet Week love connections.
OK, ladies and gents, time to kiss and tell.
ZoomInfo
Fleet Week has officially kicked off here in New York City, which means a combustion of hormones has hit our shores; flocks of men who’ve been out at sea for weeks (months!?) are commingling with residents of what sometimes seems like a man-starved city.
What better way to celebrate, as people who run a website full of stories, than sharing some of your tales of Fleet Week love connections!? 
If you want in, send us your stories of that time you met and fell for a sailor by filling out this Google form. Try and keep it somewhat clean, so we can publish it in its entirety, and let us know if you don’t want to remain anonymous.
We’ll be gathering the best of the bunch for a story on Fleet Week love connections.
OK, ladies and gents, time to kiss and tell.
ZoomInfo

Fleet Week has officially kicked off here in New York City, which means a combustion of hormones has hit our shores; flocks of men who’ve been out at sea for weeks (months!?) are commingling with residents of what sometimes seems like a man-starved city.

What better way to celebrate, as people who run a website full of stories, than sharing some of your tales of Fleet Week love connections!? 

If you want in, send us your stories of that time you met and fell for a sailor by filling out this Google form. Try and keep it somewhat clean, so we can publish it in its entirety, and let us know if you don’t want to remain anonymous.

We’ll be gathering the best of the bunch for a story on Fleet Week love connections.

OK, ladies and gents, time to kiss and tell.

Our wedding was about much, much more than a certificate and a platinum band. It was about two people and two families coming together to celebrate as one. For most of my life as a gay man, I thought I would never have the opportunity to get married, and so I wrote the whole wedding thing off as some silly ritual. Yet given the window of opportunity in 2008 to say “I do,” I did—with the enthusiasm of the fiercest Bridezilla.
Newsweek & The Daily Beast editor David Jefferson writes on his four gay marriages—and the significance of his one wedding, a human rite of passage.

Sex With A Freshman? 6 Years in Jail!

Today in infuriating laws that drastically need to be re-examined, Abigal Pesta takes a deep look at the sad case of Ken Baldino, an 18-year-old senior in high school who spent six years in jail for having sex with his girlfriend, a 14-year-old freshman. 

Here’s an excerpt:

ON A RECENT RAINY AFTERNOON, Francie Baldino steps into her kitchen and pulls out a favorite photo of her son as a toddler, dressed in a bee costume. Then she sits down at the table and describes the events that sent him to prison.

Baldino was a remarried mother of two when her son, Ken Thornsberry (who uses his father’s surname), met a girl named Emily Lester at a local Tower Records. The two teenagers were living with their fathers in the wake of divorce; both were struggling to find their footing at home and at school, says Baldino. They attended different high schools, but started spending all their free time together. Eventually, they slept together, although they certainly didn’t announce that to their parents.

Lester, now 22 and living in nearby Lake Orion, Mich., remembers the romance fondly. “I’ll never forget that day we met,” she says, recalling evenings spent wandering the county fair with her boyfriend, or listening to him play guitar in his high-school band. “I’ve never loved someone like Ken.”

Her father disapproved of the relationship, Lester says, and told the pair to split up. (Her father didn’t respond to attempts to contact him.)

The teens didn’t listen. “Ken was young,” says Baldino. “He was in love. He thought nothing bad could happen to him.” She admits that she wishes she had paid more attention, but in hindsight says she was focusing too much on running a graphic-design business.

One morning, Thornsberry drove to Lester’s house when he thought her father would be at work. His plan, he says: to pick up some belongings and drive his girlfriend to school. But her father saw Thornsberry outside the home and the two started arguing. Thornsberry kicked open the front door and hurled a sugar bowl at the TV. The father called the police. Thornsberry was arrested for home invasion.

When questioned by detectives, Thornsberry, then 18, admitted to sleeping with his 14-year-old girlfriend. On the advice of his attorney, he pleaded guilty to criminal sexual misconduct and was sentenced to a year in jail followed by three years’ probation, during which time he could not be around minors, including his girlfriend. He would also go on the sex-offender registry, which would list his home address and other personal information, for 25 years.

Keep reading. It’s a long read but well worth it for its examination of the merits of jailing high school lovers because the law says what they’re up to is illegal. What’s most frustrating about this to us is it completely denies the kid, Ken, of a normal young adulthood in which he would’ve learned the skills necessary to be a normal contributing member of society. Nice job, government.

Update: The New York Times' Motherlode blog weighs in, asking, “How do we balance protecting children on the cusp of teenage life with not destroying the lives of teenagers barely over the edge of legal adulthood? Neither jail nor a free pass feels like the right answer.”

fashion57 asked

This guy I was "talking to" just randomly stopped talking to me. I miss him but I know it's over. What are some ways to get over him? I'm really hurt.

Find a new guy to “talk to” and have “lots of really long, interesting, and insightful conversations.” You could also always get a bucket of ice cream and watch really bad rom-coms for a few days. That’s well within your rights.

Ever since we first laid eyes on one another, we’ve been madly in love.
Miss Piggy, on her relationship with Kermit, in an interview with The Daily Beast’s Ramin Setoodeh. She also dishes on those gay — er, wait, best friend — cousins of hers, Bert and Ernie. Miss Piggy will return to the big screen tomorrow after a 12 year hiatus.
markcoatney:

alittlespace:

I can get behind Tumbstruck…

“Reblogged (and It Feels So Good)”“Tumbeau” “Tumblust”“Tumblr Means Never Having to Say You’re Sorry” 

The Tumblrcrush: We can see the Times Style story now. In which case, send us your Tumblr love stories: nwktumblr (at) gmail

markcoatney:

alittlespace:

I can get behind Tumbstruck

“Reblogged (and It Feels So Good)”
“Tumbeau” 
“Tumblust”
“Tumblr Means Never Having to Say You’re Sorry” 

The Tumblrcrush: We can see the Times Style story now. In which case, send us your Tumblr love stories: nwktumblr (at) gmail

Is Monogamy Obsolete? 


65 percent of women—and a whopping 80 percent of men—say they’d cheat if they knew they wouldn’t get caught.

21 percent of people who answered a 14,000-person Oprah.com survey said they have an open marriage.
More than half of Americans cheat, and yet 70 to 85 percent of adults think cheating is wrong.
(Image: GAB Archive/Getty)

Is Monogamy Obsolete?

  • 65 percent of women—and a whopping 80 percent of men—say they’d cheat if they knew they wouldn’t get caught.

  • 21 percent of people who answered a 14,000-person Oprah.com survey said they have an open marriage.
  • More than half of Americans cheat, and yet 70 to 85 percent of adults think cheating is wrong.

(Image: GAB Archive/Getty)