Posts tagged Maps
Map Shows All The Devices In The World Connected To The Internet | IFLScience

The image above isn’t your average map: it shows the location of all devices connected to the Internet in the world. The redder the area, the more devices there are.

The map was created by John Matherly, founder of the search engine Shodan and self-proclaimed Internet cartographer. To produce it, Matherly sent ping requests on August 2 to every IP address on the Internet and plotted the positive responses. There’s nothing shady or illegal about this; pings are simply network utilities which transmit an echo-request message to an IP address.

It took him just five hours to collect the data, but a further 12 to generate the image. Matherly notes on reddit that his ping requests would only reach devices that are directly connected to the Internet, such as routers. However, he has sometimes picked up smart phones.

Map Shows All The Devices In The World Connected To The Internet | IFLScience

The image above isn’t your average map: it shows the location of all devices connected to the Internet in the world. The redder the area, the more devices there are.

The map was created by John Matherly, founder of the search engine Shodan and self-proclaimed Internet cartographer. To produce it, Matherly sent ping requests on August 2 to every IP address on the Internet and plotted the positive responses. There’s nothing shady or illegal about this; pings are simply network utilities which transmit an echo-request message to an IP address.

It took him just five hours to collect the data, but a further 12 to generate the image. Matherly notes on reddit that his ping requests would only reach devices that are directly connected to the Internet, such as routers. However, he has sometimes picked up smart phones.

The San Francisco real estate market is, technically speaking, muy caliente. If you’ve looked for an apartment recently, or follow our blog, you know that rental prices have exploded and small homes sell for more than Detroit skyscrapers. 

San Francisco is a beautiful place, with a bustling economy that has drawn tens of thousands of new residents over the past few years. But the supply of housing is relatively fixed as large swathes of the city aren’t zoned for the type of high density housing that could accommodate the increased demand. So the price of housing has increased. 

The San Francisco Rent Explosion: Part II

The San Francisco real estate market is, technically speaking, muy caliente. If you’ve looked for an apartment recently, or follow our blog, you know that rental prices have exploded and small homes sell for more than Detroit skyscrapers.

San Francisco is a beautiful place, with a bustling economy that has drawn tens of thousands of new residents over the past few years. But the supply of housing is relatively fixed as large swathes of the city aren’t zoned for the type of high density housing that could accommodate the increased demand. So the price of housing has increased.

The San Francisco Rent Explosion: Part II

A map of the most offensively named places in the world | The Verge
There’s a place called Vagina in Russia, and The Cock of Arran in Scotland is said to be of particular interest to geologists. Both places are highlighted on an interactive world map that’s perfect for fourteen-year-olds everywhere.
Created by geotechnologist Gary Gale, the map lists rudely named locations across the globe, like Canada’s Spread Eagle and Anus in the Philippines. Weirdly, an unusually high percentage of places, like Chinaman’s Knob, Australia seem overly preoccupied with male genitalia. Users can only scroll around or adjust the zoom distance, but that shouldn’t stop Gale’s snigger-inducing creation from becoming a fun afternoon diversion.

A map of the most offensively named places in the world | The Verge

There’s a place called Vagina in Russia, and The Cock of Arran in Scotland is said to be of particular interest to geologists. Both places are highlighted on an interactive world map that’s perfect for fourteen-year-olds everywhere.

Created by geotechnologist Gary Gale, the map lists rudely named locations across the globe, like Canada’s Spread Eagle and Anus in the Philippines. Weirdly, an unusually high percentage of places, like Chinaman’s Knob, Australia seem overly preoccupied with male genitalia. Users can only scroll around or adjust the zoom distance, but that shouldn’t stop Gale’s snigger-inducing creation from becoming a fun afternoon diversion.

Uber, the wildly successful taxi-service app that garners both good and virulently hateful feeling, just released maps of how its services are used in the 100 cities in which it now operates.
Releasing beautiful maps is a well-worn strategy for tech companies to get a little bit of free press. Foursquare, the location check-in app, released a bunch of maps last year, Facebook did the same, and Instagram regularly releases lists of the most photographed places in the world. (Considering Quartz covered all of these, the free press strategy is self-evidently working.)
But what makes Uber’s maps different is that they go beyond telling you about how the service is used—Foursquare’s maps, for instance, look like little more than night-time shots of cities from the sky—to reveal the demographic contours of cities. Take the image above, of New York. Uber is clearly popular on the island of Manhattan, and gets decent traffic out to Brooklyn. But few residents of Queens, which is poorer and skews older (pdf), seem to use the service. The Bronx is invisible. 

Uber’s usage maps are a handy tool for finding the world’s rich, young people

Uber, the wildly successful taxi-service app that garners both good and virulently hateful feeling, just released maps of how its services are used in the 100 cities in which it now operates.

Releasing beautiful maps is a well-worn strategy for tech companies to get a little bit of free press. Foursquare, the location check-in app, released a bunch of maps last year, Facebook did the same, and Instagram regularly releases lists of the most photographed places in the world. (Considering Quartz covered all of these, the free press strategy is self-evidently working.)

But what makes Uber’s maps different is that they go beyond telling you about how the service is used—Foursquare’s maps, for instance, look like little more than night-time shots of cities from the sky—to reveal the demographic contours of cities. Take the image above, of New York. Uber is clearly popular on the island of Manhattan, and gets decent traffic out to Brooklyn. But few residents of Queens, which is poorer and skews older (pdf), seem to use the service. The Bronx is invisible.

Uber’s usage maps are a handy tool for finding the world’s rich, young people

Twenty-five years ago, America was seized with fear that Japan would overtake the U.S. Those fears proved false. Japan has suffered a recession for more than two decades, and today we welcome Japan’s participation in America’s economy. 

In the last decade, both Japan and the U.S. made significant investments in fixed and mobile broadband, each investing tens of billions annually with per capita expenditures for both countries well above $200 per person, some of the highest rates in the world, even exceeding South Korea. 

But Japan has peaked in broadband investment; the U.S. is still investing. In just the last three years, wired and wireless providers have invested more than $250 billion into America’s infrastructure. 

Forget the Broadband Bogeyman

Twenty-five years ago, America was seized with fear that Japan would overtake the U.S. Those fears proved false. Japan has suffered a recession for more than two decades, and today we welcome Japan’s participation in America’s economy.

In the last decade, both Japan and the U.S. made significant investments in fixed and mobile broadband, each investing tens of billions annually with per capita expenditures for both countries well above $200 per person, some of the highest rates in the world, even exceeding South Korea.

But Japan has peaked in broadband investment; the U.S. is still investing. In just the last three years, wired and wireless providers have invested more than $250 billion into America’s infrastructure.

Forget the Broadband Bogeyman

datanews:

The datanews team started wondering how many places someone could safely land a Boeing 777 within the potential range of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.
At the suggestion of Ian Dees we looked at data compiled by X-Plane, which seems to have the exact latitudes and longitudes of both ends of many — if not all — of the world’s runways.
As NPR points out, actually landing on one of these strips unnoticed is probably unlikely. But we saw it as a data challenge to figure out, and we were surprised at the number of large-enough spots.

datanews:

The datanews team started wondering how many places someone could safely land a Boeing 777 within the potential range of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

At the suggestion of Ian Dees we looked at data compiled by X-Plane, which seems to have the exact latitudes and longitudes of both ends of many — if not all — of the world’s runways.

As NPR points out, actually landing on one of these strips unnoticed is probably unlikely. But we saw it as a data challenge to figure out, and we were surprised at the number of large-enough spots.

Dozens of Planes Have Vanished in Post-WWII Era
Some 83 aircraft have been declared “missing” since 1948, according to data compiled by the Aviation Safety Network. The list includes planes capable of carrying more than 14 passengers and where no trace — bodies or debris — has ever been found.
"Can You Stream Me Now?" 

If the answer is no, you’re probably going to be looking at the spinning wheel of death on your laptop for a very long time. After making a big, bold promise to wire every corner of America, the telecom giants are running away from their vow to provide nationwide broadband service by 2020. 

For almost 20 years, AT&T, Verizon and the other big players have collected hundreds of billions of dollars through rate increases and surcharges to finance that ambitious plan, but after wiring the high-density big cities, they now say it’s too expensive to connect the rest of the country. But they’d like to keep all that money they banked for the project. 

In 2010, the FCC announced the National Broadband Plan, which promised to provide 100 million American households with high-speed cable by 2020. Verizon has been expanding FiOS in major markets, and AT&T has been expanding its U-verse service. And now, instead of spending that war chest digging up streets and laying fiber cable, the cable and telephone companies have invested in a massive and very successful lobbying push. 

They are persuading state legislatures and regulatory boards to quietly adopt new rules - rules written by the telecoms - to eliminate their legal obligations to provide broadband service nationwide and replace landlines with wireless. This abrupt change in plans will leave vast areas of the country with poor service, slow telecommunications and higher bills. 

This is good news if you own stock in Verizon, but very bad news if you have a small business that’s not in a city already wired up. 

MORE: Telecom Giants Drag Their Feet on Broadband for the Whole Country

"Can You Stream Me Now?"

If the answer is no, you’re probably going to be looking at the spinning wheel of death on your laptop for a very long time. After making a big, bold promise to wire every corner of America, the telecom giants are running away from their vow to provide nationwide broadband service by 2020.

For almost 20 years, AT&T, Verizon and the other big players have collected hundreds of billions of dollars through rate increases and surcharges to finance that ambitious plan, but after wiring the high-density big cities, they now say it’s too expensive to connect the rest of the country. But they’d like to keep all that money they banked for the project.

In 2010, the FCC announced the National Broadband Plan, which promised to provide 100 million American households with high-speed cable by 2020. Verizon has been expanding FiOS in major markets, and AT&T has been expanding its U-verse service. And now, instead of spending that war chest digging up streets and laying fiber cable, the cable and telephone companies have invested in a massive and very successful lobbying push.

They are persuading state legislatures and regulatory boards to quietly adopt new rules - rules written by the telecoms - to eliminate their legal obligations to provide broadband service nationwide and replace landlines with wireless. This abrupt change in plans will leave vast areas of the country with poor service, slow telecommunications and higher bills.

This is good news if you own stock in Verizon, but very bad news if you have a small business that’s not in a city already wired up.

MORE: Telecom Giants Drag Their Feet on Broadband for the Whole Country


Hello. Good day.
This map has been going around the internet. You’ve probably seen it posted with a headline like “Here is your state’s favorite band.”
But this map does not show what your state’s favorite band is. It does not purport to show what your state’s favorite band is. This map shows what band or musical artist people in your state like to listen to more than people in other states.
The man behind the map, Paul Lamere, gathered streaming data by zip code and then built an app that let’s you compare the most distinct tastes by region. Pretty cool!
For example, according to the map, people in Idaho are way more likely to listen to Tegan and Sara than people in the rest of the United States.
This does not mean, however, that Tegan and Sara is the most popular band in Idaho. What is the most popular band/musical artist in Idaho? I have no idea.
Tom Petty was pretty popular when I was growing up there, but that was years ago. Who knows? These misleading headlines are not the map’s fault.
The map is good. The map is cool. The map shows where in the country you are most likely to run into someone with the same somewhat peculiar music taste as you.
Mother Jones: This Map Does Not Show What Your State’s Favorite Band Is

Hello. Good day.

This map has been going around the internet. You’ve probably seen it posted with a headline like “Here is your state’s favorite band.”

But this map does not show what your state’s favorite band is. It does not purport to show what your state’s favorite band is. This map shows what band or musical artist people in your state like to listen to more than people in other states.

The man behind the map, Paul Lamere, gathered streaming data by zip code and then built an app that let’s you compare the most distinct tastes by region. Pretty cool!

For example, according to the map, people in Idaho are way more likely to listen to Tegan and Sara than people in the rest of the United States.

This does not mean, however, that Tegan and Sara is the most popular band in Idaho. What is the most popular band/musical artist in Idaho? I have no idea.

Tom Petty was pretty popular when I was growing up there, but that was years ago. Who knows? These misleading headlines are not the map’s fault.

The map is good. The map is cool. The map shows where in the country you are most likely to run into someone with the same somewhat peculiar music taste as you.

Mother Jones: This Map Does Not Show What Your State’s Favorite Band Is