Posts tagged Movies
Lauren Bacall, the actress whose provocative glamour elevated her to stardom in Hollywood’s golden age and whose lasting mystique put her on a plateau in American culture that few stars reach, died on Tuesday in New York. She was 89. Her death was confirmed by her son Stephen Bogart.
“Her life speaks for itself,” Mr. Bogart said. “She lived a wonderful life, a magical life.” With an insinuating pose and a seductive, throaty voice — her simplest remark sounded like a jungle mating call, one critic said — Ms. Bacall shot to fame in 1944 with her first movie, Howard Hawks’s adaptation of the Ernest Hemingway novel “To Have and Have Not,” playing opposite Humphrey Bogart, who became her lover on the set and later her husband.
Lauren Bacall Dies at 89; in a Bygone Hollywood, She Purred Every Word

Lauren Bacall, the actress whose provocative glamour elevated her to stardom in Hollywood’s golden age and whose lasting mystique put her on a plateau in American culture that few stars reach, died on Tuesday in New York. She was 89. Her death was confirmed by her son Stephen Bogart.

“Her life speaks for itself,” Mr. Bogart said. “She lived a wonderful life, a magical life.” With an insinuating pose and a seductive, throaty voice — her simplest remark sounded like a jungle mating call, one critic said — Ms. Bacall shot to fame in 1944 with her first movie, Howard Hawks’s adaptation of the Ernest Hemingway novel “To Have and Have Not,” playing opposite Humphrey Bogart, who became her lover on the set and later her husband.

Lauren Bacall Dies at 89; in a Bygone Hollywood, She Purred Every Word

Earlier this month, BabyCentre, a popular parenting Web site, released its mid-year report on the top hundred names this year chosen by its members in the U.K.* Usually, the popularity of names stays roughly the same from one year to the next. 

But, this year, a name jumped two hundred and forty-three slots, into eighty-eighth place: Elsa. As in Elsa from a recent Disney film you may or may not have heard of, “Frozen.” Since its release, “Frozen” has earned $1.2 billion worldwide, becoming the fifth-highest-grossing film of all time and by far the highest-grossing animation. That’s not to mention two Academy Awards, a BAFTA, a Golden Globe, a soundtrack that’s garnered more than a million album sales and seven million Spotify streams, official YouTube video views in the hundreds of millions, and a DVD that became Amazon’s best-selling children’s film of all time based on advance orders alone. 

The film’s success transcends the commercial realm. It’s on the streets in the guise of little girls (and boys) belting at the top of their lungs. (The wait time recently at Disney World to meet Elsa: five hours.) “Frozen” birthday parties, high-school boys leading “Let It Go” choruses, college students arranging movie nights. Adults, too, have been hit hard—many of them without children of their own to spur them on. 

“Frozen” has a Twitter hashtag that spans all age groups—#TheColdNeverBotheredMeAnyway—and fan videos that include adolescents and adults along with toddlers and teenyboppers. Jennifer Lee, one of the film’s directors, has documented “Let It Go” interpretations that touch on autism, cancer, and divorce. 

Even people who haven’t seen the film feel its constant presence. “I haven’t seen it but I know all the songs,” Molly Webster, a producer at Radiolab, told me. How? “There isn’t a single time I’ve walked down the street in N.Y.C. the last two months and some kid isn’t singing it.” 

How the Disney Animated Film ‘Frozen’ Took Over the World : The New Yorker

Earlier this month, BabyCentre, a popular parenting Web site, released its mid-year report on the top hundred names this year chosen by its members in the U.K.* Usually, the popularity of names stays roughly the same from one year to the next.

But, this year, a name jumped two hundred and forty-three slots, into eighty-eighth place: Elsa. As in Elsa from a recent Disney film you may or may not have heard of, “Frozen.” Since its release, “Frozen” has earned $1.2 billion worldwide, becoming the fifth-highest-grossing film of all time and by far the highest-grossing animation. That’s not to mention two Academy Awards, a BAFTA, a Golden Globe, a soundtrack that’s garnered more than a million album sales and seven million Spotify streams, official YouTube video views in the hundreds of millions, and a DVD that became Amazon’s best-selling children’s film of all time based on advance orders alone.

The film’s success transcends the commercial realm. It’s on the streets in the guise of little girls (and boys) belting at the top of their lungs. (The wait time recently at Disney World to meet Elsa: five hours.) “Frozen” birthday parties, high-school boys leading “Let It Go” choruses, college students arranging movie nights. Adults, too, have been hit hard—many of them without children of their own to spur them on.

“Frozen” has a Twitter hashtag that spans all age groups—#TheColdNeverBotheredMeAnyway—and fan videos that include adolescents and adults along with toddlers and teenyboppers. Jennifer Lee, one of the film’s directors, has documented “Let It Go” interpretations that touch on autism, cancer, and divorce.

Even people who haven’t seen the film feel its constant presence. “I haven’t seen it but I know all the songs,” Molly Webster, a producer at Radiolab, told me. How? “There isn’t a single time I’ve walked down the street in N.Y.C. the last two months and some kid isn’t singing it.”

How the Disney Animated Film ‘Frozen’ Took Over the World : The New Yorker

Back in 2012, just before his World War II drama Red Tails premiered, George Lucas, maker of some of the most popular and profitable movies in history, announced that he was retiring from commercial filmmaking. He said that he wanted to spend his retirement making experimental movies like the ones he made while studying film at the University of Southern California in the late 1960s.

One of his student films simply depicted clouds moving across the sky. Another is based on a poem by E. E. Cummings. And another, his most famous, is Electronic Labyrinth THX 1138 4EB (above), which took first prize in the category of Dramatic Films at the 3rd National Student Film Festival in New York City, in 1968.

REVIEW: http://www.openculture.com/2014/06/george-lucas-student-film-electronic-labyrinth-thx-1138-4eb.html

(Source: youtube.com)

“To Kill a Sparrow” (by CIR

“To Kill a Sparrow” is a short film revealing the plight of woman in Afghanistan who are imprisoned for so-called “moral crimes”: running away from forced marriages or domestic abuse, or falling in love and marrying against a father’s wishes. “Sparrow” tells the story of Soheila and her lover Niaz, who are sentenced to prison for daring to live together as a couple. Soheila is defying her father’s order to marry a much older man. If Soheila persists in refusing to submit to the arranged marriage, her father and brother say they will kill her “even if she moves to America.”

It’s 4:30 P.M., early December 2004, and a caravan of Humvees rumbles out of Camp Victory carrying Staff Sergeant Jeffrey S. Sarver and his team of bomb-squad technicians from the U.S. Army’s 788th Ordnance Company. 

As Sarver’s team bounces down Victory’s rutted roads, the convoy passes a helipad where Chinooks, Black Hawks and Apaches thump in and out, some of them armed with laser-guided missiles and 30-millimeter cannons that fire fist-size shells. Sarver sees the Bradley and Abrams tanks sitting in neat rows, like cars at a dealership, their depleted-uranium bumpers aligned with precision. 

All that lethal hardware is parked, more or less useless against the Iraqi insurgency’s main weapon in this phase of the war: improvised explosive devices made from artillery shells, nine-volt batteries and electrical tape—what the troops call IEDs. 

As they leave the front gate, Sarver is in high spirits. 

He grabs the radio and sings out in his West Virginia twang, “Hey, ah, do you want to be the dirty old man or the cute young boy?” “I’ll be the boy,” comes the response with a laugh. It’s Sarver’s junior team member, Specialist Jonathan Williams. 

"Okay, cute boy. This is dirty old man, over." "Roger, ol’ man. We’re en route to the ah-ee-dee." 

The Man in the Bomb Suit: The Story That Inspired The Hurt Locker

It’s 4:30 P.M., early December 2004, and a caravan of Humvees rumbles out of Camp Victory carrying Staff Sergeant Jeffrey S. Sarver and his team of bomb-squad technicians from the U.S. Army’s 788th Ordnance Company.

As Sarver’s team bounces down Victory’s rutted roads, the convoy passes a helipad where Chinooks, Black Hawks and Apaches thump in and out, some of them armed with laser-guided missiles and 30-millimeter cannons that fire fist-size shells. Sarver sees the Bradley and Abrams tanks sitting in neat rows, like cars at a dealership, their depleted-uranium bumpers aligned with precision.

All that lethal hardware is parked, more or less useless against the Iraqi insurgency’s main weapon in this phase of the war: improvised explosive devices made from artillery shells, nine-volt batteries and electrical tape—what the troops call IEDs.

As they leave the front gate, Sarver is in high spirits.

He grabs the radio and sings out in his West Virginia twang, “Hey, ah, do you want to be the dirty old man or the cute young boy?” “I’ll be the boy,” comes the response with a laugh. It’s Sarver’s junior team member, Specialist Jonathan Williams.

"Okay, cute boy. This is dirty old man, over." "Roger, ol’ man. We’re en route to the ah-ee-dee."

The Man in the Bomb Suit: The Story That Inspired The Hurt Locker

Are you ready for the #Oscars? We’ll be live-drawing the whole show! Art by Roxanne Palmer.

Are you ready for the #Oscars? We’ll be live-drawing the whole show! Art by Roxanne Palmer.