Posts tagged OWS
The Occupy movement has raised important questions about rising inequality, and about the terms of the bailout. I think that we continue to experience the political fallout from anger over the bailout—esp. the fact that it did not hold the banks to account. Nor did subsequent regulations resolve the problem of banks “too big to fail.” It is important to continue to keep these questions at the center of our politics.
We’re chatting live with Harvard’s Michael Sandel about capitalism and morality. Come join us.  (via cheatsheet)
Michael Lewis, an author who has written extensively about the financial crisis, interviewed himself and asked of the Occupy Wall Street relationship with the media, “Why do writers think it’s okay to be all talk and no action?”
Here’s his answer:

Okay, I’ll tell you what happened. Twice I wandered around Occupy camps—in Washington and in San Francisco. There was one giddy moment when I thought I should get up and give a rousing speech about the evils of credit default swaps. After that, I just felt absurd. I was of no use.

Michael Lewis Interviews Himself

Michael Lewis, an author who has written extensively about the financial crisis, interviewed himself and asked of the Occupy Wall Street relationship with the media, “Why do writers think it’s okay to be all talk and no action?”

Here’s his answer:

Okay, I’ll tell you what happened. Twice I wandered around Occupy camps—in Washington and in San Francisco. There was one giddy moment when I thought I should get up and give a rousing speech about the evils of credit default swaps. After that, I just felt absurd. I was of no use.

Michael Lewis Interviews Himself

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Spotted in Brooklyn by your tumblr this weekend.

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Spotted in Brooklyn by your tumblr this weekend.

We had planned on being there for 24 hours. They were using their clubs and beating the crap out of people.
That’s an Occupy protester on the scene from Zuccotti last night. The NYPD are not treating the return of OWS lightly.

(Source: New York Daily News)

There were some instances where for the first time, our rights were respected as media reps and we even had some big guys making sure we had good positions in a restricted area to get important photos. A very slight improvement, but an improvement nonetheless. Maybe I’m glass-half-fulling here, but I did feel a slight shift.
Credentialed freelance photographer Andrew Kelly noting a slight uptick in respect from the NYPD following the department stepping up its media training following the #OWS mistreatment of journalists.

Protesters attempted to take a vacant lot at Duarte Square near The Park Formerly Known As Liberty this weekend, but the NYPD arrested 40 and cleared out the property. Here’s video.

We heard accounts of excessive force in events around the country, and it became clear it was a national issue. It seemed it merited a national response, and the coordination that Justice could bring. He wanted to make sure it was comprehensive in its scope.
Remember that Congressman who asked the Justice Department to investigate alleged police misconduct against protesters and reporters at Occupy Wall Street? When we posted the headline this week, you all seemed pretty interested in the guy. So we reached out to his office to profile Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.). The above quote is from Nadler’s press secretary, Ilan Kayatsky.

Camps Are Cleared, but ‘99 Percent’ Still Occupies the Lexicon http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/01/us/we-are-the-99-percent-joins-the-cultural-and-political-lexicon.html?hp

peterfeld:

thedeadline:

On the front page today, a look at how the term “the 99 percent” resonates.

Excellent look by Brian Stelter on the cultural impact of political slogans.

Tumblr gets a New York Times front page shout-out today!

“We are getting nothing,” read the Tumblr blog “We Are the 99 Percent” that helped popularize the percentages, “while the other one percent is getting everything.”