Posts tagged Obama
Obama will use his executive authority to start the most ambitious anti-global warming initiative of any US president.
Step aside, Keystone XL pipeline. There’s a new, bigger climate battle about to take over Washington.
With Congress in gridlock and climate change deniers still dominating the Republican Party, President Obama will use his executive authority to move forward on the most ambitious anti-global warming initiative of any U.S. president.
On Monday, the administration will announce new carbon pollution standards for the nation’s more than 1,000 power plants which produce 40 percent of the country’s carbon pollution — making these plants the country’s number one producer of greenhouse gases causing climate change. A New York Times report Thursday said the new rules will call for a decrease of 20 percent of plants’ emissions by 2020, a significant amount.
But like everything in Washington these days, the new rules won’t become final without a major fight, and both sides are preparing for war — in Congress, in the courts, at the state-level, even at the ballot box.

Obama will use his executive authority to start the most ambitious anti-global warming initiative of any US president.

Step aside, Keystone XL pipeline. There’s a new, bigger climate battle about to take over Washington.

With Congress in gridlock and climate change deniers still dominating the Republican Party, President Obama will use his executive authority to move forward on the most ambitious anti-global warming initiative of any U.S. president.

On Monday, the administration will announce new carbon pollution standards for the nation’s more than 1,000 power plants which produce 40 percent of the country’s carbon pollution — making these plants the country’s number one producer of greenhouse gases causing climate change. A New York Times report Thursday said the new rules will call for a decrease of 20 percent of plants’ emissions by 2020, a significant amount.

But like everything in Washington these days, the new rules won’t become final without a major fight, and both sides are preparing for war — in Congress, in the courts, at the state-level, even at the ballot box.

Obamacare won’t get close to offering universal coverage, even after 10 years.
Few government policies today are as controversial as Obamacare, but love it or hate it, the overall impact may not be as big as you think.
Take a main goal of Obamacare: to decrease the number of uninsured Americans—or as the Obama administration puts it, to provide affordable insurance to all Americans. According to early estimates, 8 million Americans have signed up on the exchanges. That sounds like a lot, but it’s unclear just how many of them were previously uninsured. Rand Corp., a nonprofit global policy think tank, estimates that up to three-fourths of the exchange customers, as many as 6 million, previously had insurance. Yet it is thought that millions more Americans have health insurance now, thanks to the expansion of Medicaid and coverage of more 20-somethings through their parents’ plans. RAND calculates that 9 million formerly uninsured Americans now have health insurance because of Obamacare.
Nine million more Americans with coverage is a real accomplishment. But that reduces the problem by only 20 percent. What’s more, things won’t be much better over time. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that after 10 years of Obamacare, 31 million people in the U.S. will still lack health insurance.
Out of those 31 million uninsured, the CBO posits that one-third may be in the country illegally. The rest might be ineligible for Medicaid because they live in a state that has chosen not to expand coverage or choose not to enroll in Medicaid. Some of the rest simply decide for whatever reason not to obtain health insurance.
But if around 10 percent of the population remains uninsured despite Obamacare, that means the U.S. still faces a substantial coverage gap. The Obama administration can take credit for progress toward the president’s goals, but every other wealthy nation in the world solved this problem a long time ago. Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand and all of Europe provide health insurance to all. Yet for now, the United States seems content to shrink the problem rather than solve it.

Obamacare won’t get close to offering universal coverage, even after 10 years.

Few government policies today are as controversial as Obamacare, but love it or hate it, the overall impact may not be as big as you think.

Take a main goal of Obamacare: to decrease the number of uninsured Americans—or as the Obama administration puts it, to provide affordable insurance to all Americans. According to early estimates, 8 million Americans have signed up on the exchanges. That sounds like a lot, but it’s unclear just how many of them were previously uninsured. Rand Corp., a nonprofit global policy think tank, estimates that up to three-fourths of the exchange customers, as many as 6 million, previously had insurance. Yet it is thought that millions more Americans have health insurance now, thanks to the expansion of Medicaid and coverage of more 20-somethings through their parents’ plans. RAND calculates that 9 million formerly uninsured Americans now have health insurance because of Obamacare.

Nine million more Americans with coverage is a real accomplishment. But that reduces the problem by only 20 percent. What’s more, things won’t be much better over time. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that after 10 years of Obamacare, 31 million people in the U.S. will still lack health insurance.

Out of those 31 million uninsured, the CBO posits that one-third may be in the country illegally. The rest might be ineligible for Medicaid because they live in a state that has chosen not to expand coverage or choose not to enroll in Medicaid. Some of the rest simply decide for whatever reason not to obtain health insurance.

But if around 10 percent of the population remains uninsured despite Obamacare, that means the U.S. still faces a substantial coverage gap. The Obama administration can take credit for progress toward the president’s goals, but every other wealthy nation in the world solved this problem a long time ago. Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand and all of Europe provide health insurance to all. Yet for now, the United States seems content to shrink the problem rather than solve it.

President Obama’s State of the Union Address faces a Congress frozen in partisan gridlock while his own popularity has taken a hit over the past year. What chance he will be able to get anything done over the next twelve months?
Last year, Obama watched helpless as his legislative agenda stalled in Congress. His plans for immigration reform and a bill to expand background checks for gun buyers got nowhere.
Though Congress has recently announced deals on a new budget and a farm bill, and talk of immigration reform has picked up again, the chance of Republicans becoming willing partners with the president is remote. Facing this reality, Obama’s State of the Union will stress that if Congress refuses to act he is willing to enact his agenda through executive actions.
For a president to govern through executive action is often controversial, but on priorities like income inequality to climate change, Obama is unlikely to make progress unless he flexes all the powers of his office.
"I’ve got a pen, and I’ve got a phone. And I can use that pen to sign executive orders and take executive actions and administrative actions that move the ball forward," Obama told reporters earlier this month. “I’ve got a phone that allows me to convene Americans from every walk of life, nonprofits, businesses, the private sector, universities to try to bring more and more Americans together around what I think is a unifying theme: making sure that this is a country where, if you work hard, you can make it.” MORE from Newsweek’s Pema Levy Obama Ready to Sidestep Congress in Today’s State of the Union)

President Obama’s State of the Union Address faces a Congress frozen in partisan gridlock while his own popularity has taken a hit over the past year. What chance he will be able to get anything done over the next twelve months?

Last year, Obama watched helpless as his legislative agenda stalled in Congress. His plans for immigration reform and a bill to expand background checks for gun buyers got nowhere.

Though Congress has recently announced deals on a new budget and a farm bill, and talk of immigration reform has picked up again, the chance of Republicans becoming willing partners with the president is remote. Facing this reality, Obama’s State of the Union will stress that if Congress refuses to act he is willing to enact his agenda through executive actions.

For a president to govern through executive action is often controversial, but on priorities like income inequality to climate change, Obama is unlikely to make progress unless he flexes all the powers of his office.

"I’ve got a pen, and I’ve got a phone. And I can use that pen to sign executive orders and take executive actions and administrative actions that move the ball forward," Obama told reporters earlier this month. “I’ve got a phone that allows me to convene Americans from every walk of life, nonprofits, businesses, the private sector, universities to try to bring more and more Americans together around what I think is a unifying theme: making sure that this is a country where, if you work hard, you can make it.”
MORE from Newsweek’s Pema Levy Obama Ready to Sidestep Congress in Today’s State of the Union)

America’s role in the world is steadily shrinking-and that’s nothing to celebrate.
For this week’s Newsweek cover story, “The Puny Superpower,” James P. Rubin says the diplomatic debacle over Syria reflects a profound transformation that appears to be taking place in American foreign policy. It’s a transformation that he fears we will regret. 
How do you think President Obama handled the Syria crisis this past week? Is America’s foreign influence waning?

America’s role in the world is steadily shrinking-and that’s nothing to celebrate.

For this week’s Newsweek cover story, “The Puny Superpower,” James P. Rubin says the diplomatic debacle over Syria reflects a profound transformation that appears to be taking place in American foreign policy. It’s a transformation that he fears we will regret. 

How do you think President Obama handled the Syria crisis this past week? Is America’s foreign influence waning?

Just when you thought Daft Punk’s song ‘Get Lucky’ couldn’t trend any harder…

bibliospork:

My opinion on the font used in the president’s speech. I recreated it as well as I could in the 5 minutes I have. If the image quality is bad, I’m sorry; I can’t get tumblr to make it nicer on dashboards. It looks better on my blog.
In my non-professional opinion: The font is good old Times New Roman, with line spacing increased. The reason it looks different is because it also has tracking - the spaces in between the letters - increased, and the kerning - the relationship between specific letters to make the word flow better - is changed.
I could be wrong, though. I wouldn’t swear to it in court…

And there we have it. Nice job, bibliospork!

bibliospork:

My opinion on the font used in the president’s speech. I recreated it as well as I could in the 5 minutes I have. If the image quality is bad, I’m sorry; I can’t get tumblr to make it nicer on dashboards. It looks better on my blog.

In my non-professional opinion: The font is good old Times New Roman, with line spacing increased. The reason it looks different is because it also has tracking - the spaces in between the letters - increased, and the kerning - the relationship between specific letters to make the word flow better - is changed.

I could be wrong, though. I wouldn’t swear to it in court…

And there we have it. Nice job, bibliospork!

Today in Guns

This

A 15-year-old majorette who performed at some of President Barack Obama’s recent inauguration festivities has been shot to death in Chicago.

Police say Hadiya Pendleton was shot in the back Tuesday in a South Side park and died at a city hospital.

Authorities say Hadiya was one of about 12 teenagers sheltering from heavy rain under a canopy when a man jumped a fence, ran toward the group and opened fire. The man fled the scene in a vehicle. No arrests have been made.

…sucks.

We know that America thrives when every person can find independence and pride in their work; when the wages of honest labor liberate families from the brink of hardship. We are true to our creed when a little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else, because she is an American, she is free, and she is equal, not just in the eyes of God but also in our own.
President Obama in his Inauguration speech, as prepared. You can watch here.
This week’s cover previews the Inauguration. New issue’s in the App Store! Grab it if you’re looking for a weekend iPad read here. You can also read the cover story online here.

These are gloomy times for an inauguration. In Newsweek, Evan Thomas asks: On Monday, can the president rise to the occasion with a historically inspiring message?

This week’s cover previews the Inauguration. New issue’s in the App Store! Grab it if you’re looking for a weekend iPad read here. You can also read the cover story online here.

These are gloomy times for an inauguration. In Newsweek, Evan Thomas asks: On Monday, can the president rise to the occasion with a historically inspiring message?

Watch President Obama age from January 2009 to December 2012. Connie Mariano, White House physician from 1992 to 2001, observes, “It’s like they went in a time machine and fast-forwarded eight years in the span of four years.”
via Washington Post

Watch President Obama age from January 2009 to December 2012. Connie Mariano, White House physician from 1992 to 2001, observes, “It’s like they went in a time machine and fast-forwarded eight years in the span of four years.”

via Washington Post