Posts tagged Occupy Wall Street
The Occupy movement has raised important questions about rising inequality, and about the terms of the bailout. I think that we continue to experience the political fallout from anger over the bailout—esp. the fact that it did not hold the banks to account. Nor did subsequent regulations resolve the problem of banks “too big to fail.” It is important to continue to keep these questions at the center of our politics.
We’re chatting live with Harvard’s Michael Sandel about capitalism and morality. Come join us.  (via cheatsheet)

Which Bank Is the Worst?http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/10/25/why-occupy-wall-street-hates-the-big-banks.html

cheatsheet:

We’ve outlined the seven deadliest sins of the big banks. Read them here, and then tell us which one you think is the worst.

1.  JPMorgan Chase kicks 54 military families out of their homes—despite a law against doing so.

2. Wells Fargo gives bonuses to loan officers to put minority borrowers into high-priced subprime mortgages—internally dubbed “ghetto loans.”

3. Citigroup, Bank of America, and Goldman Sachs all pay huge fines to settle charges they duped their own clients.

4. Goldman Sachs assists in Europe’s economic collapse by helping Greece mask the truth about its finances.

5. JPMorgan turns a blind eye to Bernie Madoff’s deceptions.

6. Bank of America pays $137 million to settle government claims it rigged the municipal-bond market.

7. Despite these and other unpardonable sins, banks showers tens of millions of dollars in bonus money on top executives.

Or tweet using hashtag #TheWorstBank.

#ClassWar! How Andrew Sullivan Learned to Love the ‘Goddamn Hippies’ at Occupy Wall Street

Dish blogger Andrew Sullivan has come around to the ”goddamn hippies” at Occupy Wall Street. “Maybe it was seeing a more diverse crowd in D.C. than I expected, or absorbing online testimonies from 99%-ers, or reading yet another story about how corrupt the banking system has become (Citigroup was the latest to have me fuming),” he writes. But it happened. And oddly, it’s made him think more fondly of the Tea Party as well.

Here’s an excerpt:

The theme that connects them all is disenfranchisement, the sense that the world is shifting deeply and inexorably beyond our ability to control it through our democratic institutions. You can call this many things, but a “democratic deficit” gets to the nub of it. Democracy means rule by the people—however rough-edged, however blunted by representative government, however imperfect. But everywhere, the people feel as if someone else is now ruling them—and see no way to regain control. In Europe, you see millions unemployed because of a financial crisis that began thousands of miles away in the U.S. real-estate market—and grim austerity being imposed to save a currency union that never truly won mass democratic support in the first place. In the U.S., the hefty majority for sweeping reform behind Barack Obama’s victory in 2008 has been stopped in its tracks by slightly more than half of one House in the Congress and by a historically unprecedented filibuster in the Senate. Even when it is perfectly clear what the only politically viable, long-term solution is to our debt crisis—a mix of defense and entitlement cuts and tax increases—it is beyond our democratically elected leaders to reach a deal. In fact, one major party has gone on record declaring that it would risk national default rather than cede a millimeter on taxes. The Tea Partiers too are revolting against a Republican establishment that overspent and overborrowed throughout the Bush-Cheney years, and treated principled conservative critics as traitors or irrelevant. Bush and Cheney also failed to do what any viable government must: secure the border so that it can recognize who is a citizen and who is not. Members of the Tea Party too feel disenfranchised and alienated—from a popular culture that seems hostile to traditional ways of life to a political system so in hock to special interests that pork and partisanship triumph over sane budgeting time after time after time.

You can ignore much of this if the economy is generating enough jobs and sufficient dynamism to distract attention. That’s why Dancing With the Stars exists. But after the deepest recession since the 1930s, the patience runs out. That, it seems to me, is the core of what has been happening. The global public, more aware than ever of what is going on in the world, and more able than ever before to share ideas, facts, experiences, and testimonies, is acutely sensitive to the vested interests of the powerful who stand in the way of their dreams. In recent years they have risen up outside the box of conventional politics. In 2008 vast new numbers of Americans transformed the political process through social media and small-donor fundraising, electing a rank outsider, Obama, who challenged the natural heirs to the old system, the Clintons. The next year Iranians, empowered by the same technologies, called their own leaders’ electoral bluff and nearly changed the world. This year the very same empowerment gave us the Arab Spring. Even now, in Syria, after unimaginable intimidation and brute violence, thousands still manage to protest in the streets—at night if they have to. More obscured, but just as tenacious, public demonstrations in China have rattled the government. Even the Burmese junta recently gave in to public pressure and scrapped a major dam development.

Read the full piece. If you’re on Twitter, we’d love if you shared your reasons for standing with—or against—the Occupy Wall Street movement using the hashtag #ClassWar. If you’re not, share yours with a reblog or a message right here.

Gary Bedard writes:

I’m working on a new series of illustrations about the Occupy Wall Street protests. This time I’m going to focus on all the evidence of police brutality surrounding the protests.

He promises he’ll be drawing more illustrations of #OWS scenes, “so stay tuned.”

Gary Bedard writes:

I’m working on a new series of illustrations about the Occupy Wall Street protests. This time I’m going to focus on all the evidence of police brutality surrounding the protests.

He promises he’ll be drawing more illustrations of #OWS scenes, “so stay tuned.”

"Dear Occupy Wall Street Protesters"

Stay leaderless and anonymous. It appeared at first that not having a leader, a single face people could relate to, would be your fatal flaw. Now it seems to be the mark of your collective genius. The media would pounce on a leader, or leaders, and reduce your entire movement to a life story, a personality. Now they have nothing to grasp but your ideas, and your outrage. Then, too, leaders can be flattered, rewarded, ego-gratified and tamed. Once someone who speaks for you appears (gulp) on the cover of a national magazine, you’re done for.

Don’t give them any kind of story. They’re waiting for it. They’re waiting for the guy who throws the rock, the girl who overdoses, the person who dies suddenly, mysteriously while camping out. Stay controlled. If the unfortunate or tragic thing happens, move on quickly with something dramatic and serious.

Be inclusive. Protest the government’s indifference to the physical and mental health problems and the often-vulnerable financial circumstances of returning veterans. Cry out against the callousness toward the first responders to the Twin Towers on 9/11. Embrace everyone hurt by the greedheads and their political enablers.

Keep your nature mercurial. Drop leaflets off the top of Trump Tower. March (I love you for wanting to do this) on the millionaires’ (billionaires is more like it) homes. Have some real people with real stories—perhaps their faces covered with black hoods as though they were in government custody; you get the idea—tell their heartbreaking tales of losing their homes, their jobs, their uninsured loved ones to illness. Go faster than the nanosecond news cycle. You will drive the News Brain insane.

Come up with a slogan a day. Something like (forgive my forwardness) “No representation without taxation.” Increase and diversify the velocity of your messages to a maddening pace.

- That’s Lee Siegel, writing on the Beast, with a handful of advice for how Occupy Wall Street can avoid cooptation

The full video has emerged depicting the scene earlier this morning when a Legal Aid Society observer was photographed getting run over by an NYPD scooter.

What we can tell from this: not much, in terms of the claim that he purposely put his foot under the scooter (“I saw him sticking his legs under the bike to make it appear he was run over,” per the Daily News’s photographer who was there.).

It’s pretty clear he was arrested—albeit quite violently, he gets rag-dolled a bit—for kicking over the scooter. The question, then, is did the cop get up and leave the scooter parked on this man’s foot? Or did the man overreact—putting his foot under the scooter and kicking it to cause a scene?

labyrintho:

inothernews:

FORCE   A New York City police officer on a motor scooter runs over a Legal Aid Society observer as  Occupy Wall Street demonstrators march through the streets near Wall  Street, Friday, Oct. 14, 2011. (Photo: Mary Altaffer / AP via WCBS 880 AM)
Today in “Photos The NYPD Would Rather You Didn’t See.”

Apparently this protester was arrested for kicking the scooter over to free his foot.

If that’s true, that’s pretty terrible. Fact that he’s not just a protester but a Legal Aid Society observer means this isn’t the last time we’ll hear of this incident.

labyrintho:

inothernews:

FORCE   A New York City police officer on a motor scooter runs over a Legal Aid Society observer as Occupy Wall Street demonstrators march through the streets near Wall Street, Friday, Oct. 14, 2011. (Photo: Mary Altaffer / AP via WCBS 880 AM)

Today in “Photos The NYPD Would Rather You Didn’t See.”

Apparently this protester was arrested for kicking the scooter over to free his foot.

If that’s true, that’s pretty terrible. Fact that he’s not just a protester but a Legal Aid Society observer means this isn’t the last time we’ll hear of this incident.

Mother Jones put together an interactive map of Zuccotti Park, aka Liberty Park, aka “home” to hundreds of protesters taking part in Occupy Wall Street. This element of city planning is quite impressive. However, the one thing that may hold them back from implementing such a plan is the vacate order that’s been given for this Friday, as the city hopes to send in sanitation workers to clear the park of trash—and people.

Mother Jones put together an interactive map of Zuccotti Park, aka Liberty Park, aka “home” to hundreds of protesters taking part in Occupy Wall Street. This element of city planning is quite impressive. However, the one thing that may hold them back from implementing such a plan is the vacate order that’s been given for this Friday, as the city hopes to send in sanitation workers to clear the park of trash—and people.