Posts tagged SOPA
Representative Justin Amash (R-Mich.) has joined a multi-website protest of SOPA and PIPA, two anti-piracy bills, by changing his Facebook profile photo and posting a status update protesting the bills. 

On Wednesday, January 18, I will join others across the Internet in a 24-hour “blackout” to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) in the U.S. House and the PROTECT IP Act (PIPA) in the U.S. Senate. These bills give the federal government unprecedented power to censor Internet content and will stifle the free flow of information and ideas. In protest, I have changed my profile picture and will temporarily disable your ability to post independent content on my Wall (although you still may comment under this post). Demand that Congress and the President keep the Internet open and free…

Read Amash’s post in full.
Also, Politico is reporting that, Rep. Ben Quayle (R-Ariz.) and Rep. Lee Terry (R-NB), two co-sponsors of SOPA, will pull their names from the bill. Quayle did so on Tuesday and, Politico reports, Terry will follow suit today. 
(h/t Tech Crunch) 

Representative Justin Amash (R-Mich.) has joined a multi-website protest of SOPA and PIPA, two anti-piracy bills, by changing his Facebook profile photo and posting a status update protesting the bills. 

On Wednesday, January 18, I will join others across the Internet in a 24-hour “blackout” to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) in the U.S. House and the PROTECT IP Act (PIPA) in the U.S. Senate. These bills give the federal government unprecedented power to censor Internet content and will stifle the free flow of information and ideas. In protest, I have changed my profile picture and will temporarily disable your ability to post independent content on my Wall (although you still may comment under this post). Demand that Congress and the President keep the Internet open and free…

Read Amash’s post in full.

Also, Politico is reporting that, Rep. Ben Quayle (R-Ariz.) and Rep. Lee Terry (R-NB), two co-sponsors of SOPA, will pull their names from the bill. Quayle did so on Tuesday and, Politico reports, Terry will follow suit today. 

(h/t Tech Crunch

motherjones:

This is one of the draft blackout screens for Wikipedia’s planned outage tomorrow in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and its Senate twin, the Protect IP Act (PIPA) … Siddhartha Mahanta and Nick Baumann explain how Reddit, Wikipedia, and BoingBoing took on one of Washington’s most powerful lobbies—and won.  

"This is going to be wow," Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales said on Twitter Monday. "I hope Wikipedia will  melt phone systems in Washington." Wikipedia, the sixth most visited site in the world, will go black from midnight EST tonight until midnight Wednesday.

motherjones:

This is one of the draft blackout screens for Wikipedia’s planned outage tomorrow in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and its Senate twin, the Protect IP Act (PIPA) … Siddhartha Mahanta and Nick Baumann explain how Reddit, Wikipedia, and BoingBoing took on one of Washington’s most powerful lobbies—and won.  

"This is going to be wow," Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales said on Twitter Monday. "I hope Wikipedia will melt phone systems in Washington." Wikipedia, the sixth most visited site in the world, will go black from midnight EST tonight until midnight Wednesday.

Twitter, Facebook, and Google endorse alternate online piracy bill http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/technology/202627-twitter-facebook-and-google-endorse-alternate-online-piracy-bill?utm_campaign=HilliconValley&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

reuters:

Gautham Nagesh for The Hill - Eight of the largest Web companies have endorsed an online piracy bill offered by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) and Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) as an alternative to the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and its Senate counterpart PROTECT IP.

The OPEN Act would direct online patent infringement claims against foreign websites to the International Trade Commission, which would be authorized to order online ad networks and payment processors to sever ties with the rogue foreign sites.

"The OPEN Act has attracted strong support from Silicon Valley, but criticism from the entertainment industry, which claims it wouldn’t effectively prevent piracy." 

This type of thing doesn’t happen because companies typically don’t want to put their users in that position. The difference is that these bills so fundamentally change the way the Internet works. People need to understand the effect this special-interest legislation will have on those who use the Internet.
Markham Erickson of NetCoalition commenting on the fact that a so-called “nuclear option”— essentially a complete blackout of services— is being considered by Internet giants Google, Amazon, Twitter, and Facebook in an effort to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). (via ZDNET, @lheron)
It would effectively give every copyright and trademark owner a big club with which to threaten any new technology or feature that it thinks doesn’t do enough to police possible infringing uses.
That’s the Center for Democracy and Technology’s David Sohn writing on the implications of SOPA, that anti-piracy bill that Tumblr (thankfully) threw in our faces last week with their censorship dashboard takeover.