Posts tagged Science
Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, and it may be inhibiting their ability to recognize emotions, according to new research out of the University of California, Los Angeles. 

The study, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, found that sixth-graders who went five days without exposure to technology were significantly better at reading human emotions than kids who had regular access to phones, televisions, and computers. 

The UCLA researchers studied two groups of sixth-graders from a Southern California public school. One group was sent to the Pali Institute, an outdoor education camp in Running Springs, Calif., where the kids had no access to electronic devices. 

For the other group, it was life as usual. At the beginning and end of the 5-day study period, both groups of kids were shown images of nearly 50 faces and asked to identify the feelings being modeled. 

Researchers found that the students who went to camp scored significantly higher when it came to reading facial emotions or other nonverbal cues than the students who continued to have access to their media devices. 

"We were pleased to get an effect after five days," says Patricia Greenfield, a senior author of the study and a distinguished professor of psychology at UCLA. "We found that the kids who had been to camp without any screens but with lots of those opportunities and necessities for interacting with other people in person improved significantly more." 

If the study were to be expanded, Greenfield says, she’d like to test the students at camp a third time – when they’ve been back at home with smartphones and tablets in their hands for five days. 

Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say? : NPR Ed : NPR

Kids are spending more time than ever in front of screens, and it may be inhibiting their ability to recognize emotions, according to new research out of the University of California, Los Angeles.

The study, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, found that sixth-graders who went five days without exposure to technology were significantly better at reading human emotions than kids who had regular access to phones, televisions, and computers.

The UCLA researchers studied two groups of sixth-graders from a Southern California public school. One group was sent to the Pali Institute, an outdoor education camp in Running Springs, Calif., where the kids had no access to electronic devices.

For the other group, it was life as usual. At the beginning and end of the 5-day study period, both groups of kids were shown images of nearly 50 faces and asked to identify the feelings being modeled.

Researchers found that the students who went to camp scored significantly higher when it came to reading facial emotions or other nonverbal cues than the students who continued to have access to their media devices.

"We were pleased to get an effect after five days," says Patricia Greenfield, a senior author of the study and a distinguished professor of psychology at UCLA. "We found that the kids who had been to camp without any screens but with lots of those opportunities and necessities for interacting with other people in person improved significantly more."

If the study were to be expanded, Greenfield says, she’d like to test the students at camp a third time – when they’ve been back at home with smartphones and tablets in their hands for five days.

Kids And Screen Time: What Does The Research Say? : NPR Ed : NPR

zoeschlanger:

The Earth is Moving, And It’s Our Fault
Oklahoma has had more earthquakes this year than California. States are rumbling that barely did before. It’s becoming clear that humans are causing quakes through fracking-related injection wells, but plenty of people aren’t convinced.
The Earth, and the science of how everything works, is so big. We are so minute,” one Oklahoma state representative tells me. “For us to think that we have so much to do with these things is almost ludicrous.
And yet, injection-induced quakes are real. Why are we—at the level of our politics and at the level of our individual imaginations—unable to face this? 
As one USGS scientist puts it, “We’re kind of doing an experiment that we’ve never done before.”

zoeschlanger:

The Earth is Moving, And It’s Our Fault

Oklahoma has had more earthquakes this year than California. States are rumbling that barely did before. It’s becoming clear that humans are causing quakes through fracking-related injection wells, but plenty of people aren’t convinced.

The Earth, and the science of how everything works, is so big. We are so minute,” one Oklahoma state representative tells me. “For us to think that we have so much to do with these things is almost ludicrous.

And yet, injection-induced quakes are real. Why are we—at the level of our politics and at the level of our individual imaginations—unable to face this? 

As one USGS scientist puts it, “We’re kind of doing an experiment that we’ve never done before.”

Dr. Haruko Obokata, a rising star of the scientific community and lead author on two papers heralded as revolutionizing to the field of stem cell research, has been found guilty of scientific misconduct by Japan’s leading research institute. 
The accusation is the latest problem for the studies, which claimed to be able to produce stem cells from ordinary cells in simple laboratory procedures: bathing regular cells in an acid, or applying mechanical stressors like “squeezing.” The research, known as stimulus triggered activation of pluripotency (STAP), was published in Nature in January, and recently ran into questions of methodology.
On Tuesday morning, the research institute RIKEN announced that Obokata, 30, had deliberately fabricated the data to produce the findings. Institute director Ryoji Noyori said he planned to “rigorously punish relevant people after procedures in a disciplinary committee,” according to AFP. Shunsuke Ishii, chairman of the investigative committee on the issue, told reporters that “Obokata alone is responsible for the misconduct.”

Dr. Haruko Obokata, a rising star of the scientific community and lead author on two papers heralded as revolutionizing to the field of stem cell research, has been found guilty of scientific misconduct by Japan’s leading research institute. 

The accusation is the latest problem for the studies, which claimed to be able to produce stem cells from ordinary cells in simple laboratory procedures: bathing regular cells in an acid, or applying mechanical stressors like “squeezing.” The research, known as stimulus triggered activation of pluripotency (STAP), was published in Nature in January, and recently ran into questions of methodology.

On Tuesday morning, the research institute RIKEN announced that Obokata, 30, had deliberately fabricated the data to produce the findings. Institute director Ryoji Noyori said he planned to “rigorously punish relevant people after procedures in a disciplinary committee,” according to AFP. Shunsuke Ishii, chairman of the investigative committee on the issue, told reporters that “Obokata alone is responsible for the misconduct.”

The next Edward Snowden may be a geneticist on a personal mission to protect the public from new violations of privacy.
Imagine a future when Big Data has access not only to your shopping habits, but also to your DNA and other deeply personal data collected about our bodies and behavior - and about the inner workings of our proteins and cells. What will the government and others do with that data? And will we be unaware of how it’s being used - or abused - until a future Edward Snowden emerges to tell us?

The next Edward Snowden may be a geneticist on a personal mission to protect the public from new violations of privacy.

Imagine a future when Big Data has access not only to your shopping habits, but also to your DNA and other deeply personal data collected about our bodies and behavior - and about the inner workings of our proteins and cells. What will the government and others do with that data? And will we be unaware of how it’s being used - or abused - until a future Edward Snowden emerges to tell us?

lainnafader:

Awesome photo with this Newsweek story on a new, self-cleaning tape inspired by gecko feet. 

A single toe stuck to a wall is all a gecko needs to support its entire body weight. These tiny lizards have evolved microscopic hairs on their feet that exploit intermolecular forces to help them defy gravity on all kinds of surfaces: smooth or rough, dry or wet, clean or dirty. That’s why the gecko is the muse for science’s next generation of adhesives, and one such technology could be coming soon to a hardware store near you. A new gecko-inspired tape developed by a team of engineers at Carnegie Mellon University is super strong, cheap, and cleans itself with multiple uses, easily shedding dirt particles that limit the reusability of conventional adhesives, like those used in Post-It notes

lainnafader:

Awesome photo with this Newsweek story on a new, self-cleaning tape inspired by gecko feet.

A single toe stuck to a wall is all a gecko needs to support its entire body weight. These tiny lizards have evolved microscopic hairs on their feet that exploit intermolecular forces to help them defy gravity on all kinds of surfaces: smooth or rough, dry or wet, clean or dirty. That’s why the gecko is the muse for science’s next generation of adhesives, and one such technology could be coming soon to a hardware store near you. A new gecko-inspired tape developed by a team of engineers at Carnegie Mellon University is super strong, cheap, and cleans itself with multiple uses, easily shedding dirt particles that limit the reusability of conventional adhesives, like those used in Post-It notes

symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo

symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.

Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.