Posts tagged Travel
For over fifteen months, on seven different trips, photojournalist Alex Fradkin has traveled to Fogo Island and the Inn on the Island.  Each time, he stepped onto a new landscape,  a different season and a complex sense of place that permeates this 400 million year old rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic.  It is an island of wildly varying moods, sudden dramatic changes in weather and light - a powerful place that leaves one humbled, profoundly moved and deeply wanting to return every time.  The character of the inn reveals itself in new ways with every season and shift of the light.  A dream for any photographer to get to fully explore this perfect harmony of structure and place.
See more of Fradkin’s pictures at Newsweek
ZoomInfo
For over fifteen months, on seven different trips, photojournalist Alex Fradkin has traveled to Fogo Island and the Inn on the Island.  Each time, he stepped onto a new landscape,  a different season and a complex sense of place that permeates this 400 million year old rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic.  It is an island of wildly varying moods, sudden dramatic changes in weather and light - a powerful place that leaves one humbled, profoundly moved and deeply wanting to return every time.  The character of the inn reveals itself in new ways with every season and shift of the light.  A dream for any photographer to get to fully explore this perfect harmony of structure and place.
See more of Fradkin’s pictures at Newsweek
ZoomInfo
For over fifteen months, on seven different trips, photojournalist Alex Fradkin has traveled to Fogo Island and the Inn on the Island.  Each time, he stepped onto a new landscape,  a different season and a complex sense of place that permeates this 400 million year old rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic.  It is an island of wildly varying moods, sudden dramatic changes in weather and light - a powerful place that leaves one humbled, profoundly moved and deeply wanting to return every time.  The character of the inn reveals itself in new ways with every season and shift of the light.  A dream for any photographer to get to fully explore this perfect harmony of structure and place.
See more of Fradkin’s pictures at Newsweek
ZoomInfo
For over fifteen months, on seven different trips, photojournalist Alex Fradkin has traveled to Fogo Island and the Inn on the Island.  Each time, he stepped onto a new landscape,  a different season and a complex sense of place that permeates this 400 million year old rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic.  It is an island of wildly varying moods, sudden dramatic changes in weather and light - a powerful place that leaves one humbled, profoundly moved and deeply wanting to return every time.  The character of the inn reveals itself in new ways with every season and shift of the light.  A dream for any photographer to get to fully explore this perfect harmony of structure and place.
See more of Fradkin’s pictures at Newsweek
ZoomInfo
For over fifteen months, on seven different trips, photojournalist Alex Fradkin has traveled to Fogo Island and the Inn on the Island.  Each time, he stepped onto a new landscape,  a different season and a complex sense of place that permeates this 400 million year old rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic.  It is an island of wildly varying moods, sudden dramatic changes in weather and light - a powerful place that leaves one humbled, profoundly moved and deeply wanting to return every time.  The character of the inn reveals itself in new ways with every season and shift of the light.  A dream for any photographer to get to fully explore this perfect harmony of structure and place.
See more of Fradkin’s pictures at Newsweek
ZoomInfo
For over fifteen months, on seven different trips, photojournalist Alex Fradkin has traveled to Fogo Island and the Inn on the Island.  Each time, he stepped onto a new landscape,  a different season and a complex sense of place that permeates this 400 million year old rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic.  It is an island of wildly varying moods, sudden dramatic changes in weather and light - a powerful place that leaves one humbled, profoundly moved and deeply wanting to return every time.  The character of the inn reveals itself in new ways with every season and shift of the light.  A dream for any photographer to get to fully explore this perfect harmony of structure and place.
See more of Fradkin’s pictures at Newsweek
ZoomInfo
For over fifteen months, on seven different trips, photojournalist Alex Fradkin has traveled to Fogo Island and the Inn on the Island.  Each time, he stepped onto a new landscape,  a different season and a complex sense of place that permeates this 400 million year old rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic.  It is an island of wildly varying moods, sudden dramatic changes in weather and light - a powerful place that leaves one humbled, profoundly moved and deeply wanting to return every time.  The character of the inn reveals itself in new ways with every season and shift of the light.  A dream for any photographer to get to fully explore this perfect harmony of structure and place.
See more of Fradkin’s pictures at Newsweek
ZoomInfo
For over fifteen months, on seven different trips, photojournalist Alex Fradkin has traveled to Fogo Island and the Inn on the Island.  Each time, he stepped onto a new landscape,  a different season and a complex sense of place that permeates this 400 million year old rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic.  It is an island of wildly varying moods, sudden dramatic changes in weather and light - a powerful place that leaves one humbled, profoundly moved and deeply wanting to return every time.  The character of the inn reveals itself in new ways with every season and shift of the light.  A dream for any photographer to get to fully explore this perfect harmony of structure and place.
See more of Fradkin’s pictures at Newsweek
ZoomInfo
For over fifteen months, on seven different trips, photojournalist Alex Fradkin has traveled to Fogo Island and the Inn on the Island.  Each time, he stepped onto a new landscape,  a different season and a complex sense of place that permeates this 400 million year old rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic.  It is an island of wildly varying moods, sudden dramatic changes in weather and light - a powerful place that leaves one humbled, profoundly moved and deeply wanting to return every time.  The character of the inn reveals itself in new ways with every season and shift of the light.  A dream for any photographer to get to fully explore this perfect harmony of structure and place.
See more of Fradkin’s pictures at Newsweek
ZoomInfo

For over fifteen months, on seven different trips, photojournalist Alex Fradkin has traveled to Fogo Island and the Inn on the Island.  Each time, he stepped onto a new landscape,  a different season and a complex sense of place that permeates this 400 million year old rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic.  It is an island of wildly varying moods, sudden dramatic changes in weather and light - a powerful place that leaves one humbled, profoundly moved and deeply wanting to return every time.  The character of the inn reveals itself in new ways with every season and shift of the light.  A dream for any photographer to get to fully explore this perfect harmony of structure and place.

See more of Fradkin’s pictures at Newsweek

Imagine the Empire State Building. Now imagine tipping it on its side, nudging it into the Hudson, and putting out to sea. 

That was the scale of thing I contemplated one day in late November, as I gaped at the immense navy hull of CMA CGM Christophe Colomb, one of the world’s largest container ships, which stretched above and out of sight on either side of me, on a quayside in Hong Kong. 

Nearly twelve hundred feet long, it’s bigger than an aircraft carrier and longer than the world’s largest cruise ships. On Christophe Colomb, all of that space goes to boxes. 

The ship has a capacity of 13,344 TEUs—“twenty-foot equivalent units,” the size of a standard shipping container. These are stacked seven high above deck and another six to eight below. In cheerful shades of turquoise, maroon, navy, gold, and green, they look like a set of Legos designed for a young giant. 

Trying to see where one even boards such a vessel, I noticed a steep aluminum gangway and went up its seventy-four steps, through two hatches, and into the eight-story “castle” that sits above the main deck and houses the ship’s living quarters, offices, and bridge. 

This was to be my home for nearly four weeks, as I took passage on Christophe Colomb from Hong Kong to Southampton, England, via the Suez Canal. No passenger liners cover such routes anymore, but many cargo shipping companies still offer a handful of passenger cabins on their freighters, selling travelers what CMA CGM (the French company that owns Christophe Colomb) calls “a thrilling and unforgettable way to discover the great maritime trading routes” for around $130 a day. I had become interested in these sea lanes while writing a book about the world circa 1900 through the life of the novelist Joseph Conrad (1857–1924). 

Before he became a writer, Conrad spent twenty years as a merchant mariner, sailing chiefly between Asia, Australia, and Europe, and his shipboard experiences informed books such as Heart of Darkness and Lord Jim. When I saw the itinerary of Christophe Colomb today—which plies a regular eleven-week circuit between China and Europe, taking in Hong Kong, the Straits of Malacca, the Suez Canal, the Straits of Gibraltar, and the English Channel—I saw a track that Conrad had often followed and wrote about in his fiction. 

A Passage from Hong Kong by Maya Jasanoff | The New York Review of Books

Imagine the Empire State Building. Now imagine tipping it on its side, nudging it into the Hudson, and putting out to sea.

That was the scale of thing I contemplated one day in late November, as I gaped at the immense navy hull of CMA CGM Christophe Colomb, one of the world’s largest container ships, which stretched above and out of sight on either side of me, on a quayside in Hong Kong.

Nearly twelve hundred feet long, it’s bigger than an aircraft carrier and longer than the world’s largest cruise ships. On Christophe Colomb, all of that space goes to boxes.

The ship has a capacity of 13,344 TEUs—“twenty-foot equivalent units,” the size of a standard shipping container. These are stacked seven high above deck and another six to eight below. In cheerful shades of turquoise, maroon, navy, gold, and green, they look like a set of Legos designed for a young giant.

Trying to see where one even boards such a vessel, I noticed a steep aluminum gangway and went up its seventy-four steps, through two hatches, and into the eight-story “castle” that sits above the main deck and houses the ship’s living quarters, offices, and bridge.

This was to be my home for nearly four weeks, as I took passage on Christophe Colomb from Hong Kong to Southampton, England, via the Suez Canal. No passenger liners cover such routes anymore, but many cargo shipping companies still offer a handful of passenger cabins on their freighters, selling travelers what CMA CGM (the French company that owns Christophe Colomb) calls “a thrilling and unforgettable way to discover the great maritime trading routes” for around $130 a day. I had become interested in these sea lanes while writing a book about the world circa 1900 through the life of the novelist Joseph Conrad (1857–1924).

Before he became a writer, Conrad spent twenty years as a merchant mariner, sailing chiefly between Asia, Australia, and Europe, and his shipboard experiences informed books such as Heart of Darkness and Lord Jim. When I saw the itinerary of Christophe Colomb today—which plies a regular eleven-week circuit between China and Europe, taking in Hong Kong, the Straits of Malacca, the Suez Canal, the Straits of Gibraltar, and the English Channel—I saw a track that Conrad had often followed and wrote about in his fiction.

A Passage from Hong Kong by Maya Jasanoff | The New York Review of Books

Dozens of Planes Have Vanished in Post-WWII Era
Some 83 aircraft have been declared “missing” since 1948, according to data compiled by the Aviation Safety Network. The list includes planes capable of carrying more than 14 passengers and where no trace — bodies or debris — has ever been found.
STORYTELLING THROUGH AUGMENTED REALITY The third variation on this has to do with the strange, abstract, isolated feeling people have while they’re up in the air. 

The air is awkward—you’re physically constrained in the plane and there’s a disconnected feeling. What’s ironic is that people are often mentally hibernating during a flight, but it’s pretty extraordinary. You’re several miles above Earth, and underneath there’s interesting stuff. So how can we provide a tool to show the geography? 

What are the stories below? What’s happening there now? Those little progress maps in the in-flight entertainment system are essentially glorified progress bars. It just tells us how long we have until it ends. But there’s an opportunity to get to another layer of data. 

We could provide the passenger with the experience of what’s happening on the ground and feed their curiosity. (via Outlandish Ideas To Improve Air Travel, From The Designers Of Beats By Dre)

STORYTELLING THROUGH AUGMENTED REALITY The third variation on this has to do with the strange, abstract, isolated feeling people have while they’re up in the air.

The air is awkward—you’re physically constrained in the plane and there’s a disconnected feeling. What’s ironic is that people are often mentally hibernating during a flight, but it’s pretty extraordinary. You’re several miles above Earth, and underneath there’s interesting stuff. So how can we provide a tool to show the geography?

What are the stories below? What’s happening there now? Those little progress maps in the in-flight entertainment system are essentially glorified progress bars. It just tells us how long we have until it ends. But there’s an opportunity to get to another layer of data.

We could provide the passenger with the experience of what’s happening on the ground and feed their curiosity. (via Outlandish Ideas To Improve Air Travel, From The Designers Of Beats By Dre)

We take these perks for granted, but dudes, 1956! Ovens in the sky! This very picture likely exploded many-a-mind.

Here is a mockup from 1956 of the first jet-transport interior to be created in the United States. Stewardesses pose inside the 98-seat Boeing Jet Stratoliner, complete with air-conditioning, running water, ovens, refrigerators, reading lights, and emergency exits.

Moar!

We take these perks for granted, but dudes, 1956! Ovens in the sky! This very picture likely exploded many-a-mind.

Here is a mockup from 1956 of the first jet-transport interior to be created in the United States. Stewardesses pose inside the 98-seat Boeing Jet Stratoliner, complete with air-conditioning, running water, ovens, refrigerators, reading lights, and emergency exits.

Moar!

3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage… all to turn 3 ambitious linear concepts based on movement, learning and food ….into 3 beautiful and hopefully compelling short films…..

= a trip of a lifetime.

Super cool video. This is a bit like the ‘Where the Hell is Matt?’ dancing ‘round the world series but more artistic, with angles and all that good stuff.

For ‘The City’ series, Ian Buruma chronicles the pretentious tendencies of his birthplace, The Hague: 

People from The Hague, so the old story goes, pack their potatoes in violin cases instead of ordinary shopping bags. That is to say, they eat potatoes, just like you and me, but they like to put on airs, show off their refinement. This tale is not meant kindly. The Hague, where I was born, has a reputation for insufferable snobbery.

Newsweek.