Posts tagged apple

Steve Jobs Basically Introduces ‘Siri’ in 1984 Interview

In another of the many amazing quotes in that 3,500-word NEWSWEEK interview with Steve Jobs, which appeared in a 1984 special issue of the magazine, the Apple co-founder totally envisions Siri—the virtual personal assistant the company announced earlier this week.

Look!

I’ve always thought it would be really wonderful to have a little box, a sort of slate that you could carry along with you. You’d get one of these things maybe when you were 10 years old, and somehow you’d turn it on and it would say, you know, “Where am I?” And you’d somehow tell it you were in California and it would say, “Oh, who are you?”

“My name’s Steven.”

“Really? How old are you?”

“I’m 10.”

“What are we doing here?”

“Well, we’re in recess and we have to go back to class.”

“What’s class?”

You’d start to teach it about yourself. And it would just keep storing all this information about you and maybe it would recognize that every Friday afternoon you like to do something special, and maybe you’d like it to help you with this routine. So about the third time it asks you: “Well, would you like me to do this for you every Friday?” You say, “Yes,” and before long it becomes an incredibly powerful helper. It goes with you everywhere you go. It knows most of the raw information in your life that you’d like to keep, but then starts to make connections between things, and one day when you’re 18 and you’ve just split up with your girlfriend it says: “You know, Steve, the same thing has happened three times in a row.”

Here’s how Apple pitches Siri on its site today

It understands what you say.

Talk to Siri as you would to a person. Say something like “Tell my wife I’m running late.” “Remind me to call the vet.” “Any good burger joints around here?” And Siri answers you. It does what you say and finds the information you need. And then it hits you. You’re actually having a conversation with your iPhone.

Also: 

It knows what you mean.

Siri not only understands what you say, it’s smart enough to know what you mean. So when you ask “Any good burger joints around here?” Siri will reply “I found a number of burger restaurants near you.” Then you can say “Hmm. How about tacos?” Siri remembers that you just asked about restaurants, so it will look for Mexican restaurants in the neighborhood. And Siri is proactive, so it will question you until it finds what you’re looking for.

We’re talking a difference of 27, 28 years here, but Steve finally got his wish. The world finally got its “incredibly powerful helper,” one day before he died.

The types of computers we have today are tools. They’re responders: you ask a computer to do something and it will do it. The next stage is going to be computers as “agents.” In other words, it will be as if there’s a little person inside that box who starts to anticipate what you want. Rather than help you, it will start to guide you through large amounts of information. It will almost be like you have a little friend inside that box.
One of many amazing quotes in this 3,500-word NEWSWEEK interview with Steve Jobs, which appeared in a 1984 special issue of the magazine. Jobs was 29 at the time.
fuckyeahnewsweekarchives:

“iPod Nation,” NEWSWEEK, July 26, 2004.

“From early on we wanted a product that would seem so natural and so inevitable and so simple you almost wouldn’t think of it as having been designed,” says Apple’s industrial designer. This austerity extended to the whiteness of the iPod, a double-crystal polymer Antarctica, a blankness that screams in brilliant colors across a crowded subway. “It’s neutral, but it is a bold neutral, just shockingly neutral,” says Ive.
Assessing the final product, Jobs bestows, for him, the ultimate accolade: “It’s as Apple as anything Apple has ever done.”

[link]

The year the lowercase i became a way of life.

fuckyeahnewsweekarchives:

“iPod Nation,” NEWSWEEK, July 26, 2004.

“From early on we wanted a product that would seem so natural and so inevitable and so simple you almost wouldn’t think of it as having been designed,” says Apple’s industrial designer. This austerity extended to the whiteness of the iPod, a double-crystal polymer Antarctica, a blankness that screams in brilliant colors across a crowded subway. “It’s neutral, but it is a bold neutral, just shockingly neutral,” says Ive.

Assessing the final product, Jobs bestows, for him, the ultimate accolade: “It’s as Apple as anything Apple has ever done.”

[link]

The year the lowercase i became a way of life.

We’re collecting Apple employees’ tweeted tributes to paint a picture of the feeling from Cupertino. There’s beauty, there’s sadness. Steve Jobs was a true leader.

We’re collecting Apple employees’ tweeted tributes to paint a picture of the feeling from Cupertino. There’s beauty, there’s sadness. Steve Jobs was a true leader.

In this week’s issue, Cult of Mac’s Leander Kahney collects “The 10 Commandments of Steve.”

More than anything else, Jobs’s genius is in managing the creative process. Here’s his playbook.

 [See it full size]

In this week’s issue, Cult of Mac’s Leander Kahney collects “The 10 Commandments of Steve.”

More than anything else, Jobs’s genius is in managing the creative process. Here’s his playbook.

 [See it full size]

Apple CEO Steve Jobs came up with a two-part solution. Part 1: There is no problem. Part 2: Even though there is no problem, we’re going to give everyone a free case, which should insulate the antenna and prevent the interference that we just told you isn’t actually occurring. But if you’re still not happy, you can give back the phone for a full refund. Jobs’s snotty tone made it clear that he was pretty fed up with all the whining about a problem that he says doesn’t exist.

This is classic Apple behavior. No matter what the whole world can see with its own eyes, just keep saying that it isn’t true, and maybe, eventually, everyone will believe you. By refusing to acknowledge the problem, Jobs just reinforced the image of Apple as a company that is in deep denial and unable to admit a mistake—a company that has for so long been able to bend reality to suit its needs that it now has lost touch with reality itself.

The truth is, Apple needs to get on Verizon, and fast, or it risks losing customers to Android. If Verizon gets the iPhone, I’d expect a huge exodus from AT&T. Which probably explains some of AT&T’s recent behavior. With the release of iPhone 4, AT&T made an unusual offer to current owners of iPhones, telling them that even if their contracts weren’t close to being over, they could still push up their expiration date and upgrade to the iPhone 4—as long as they signed a new two-year contract.

Many people jumped on that offer, and some even viewed it as a case of AT&T being generous. Um, not likely. More likely it’s that AT&T knows its exclusive lock on iPhone is coming to an end, and so it sought to lock in as many iPhone users before the deal with Verizon happens.

To those folks who waited in line for hours and hours to take advantage of AT&T’s “generous” offer, I can only offer my condolences and point out that, given AT&T’s past behavior, you should have known better.

Today’s Apple event marks an important tipping point – it marks the point where Android starts to surge past Apple the way Windows surged past Apple in personal computers back in the 1990s. Moreover, I also believe that Jobs knows this, and doesn’t care. I think he’d rather have a small share of the market where he can exert complete control and create beautiful products that look exactly the way he wants them to look. Thus we have the new iPhone 4, which will cost a little more but will have pretty icons, pretty ads, and a cool video chat feature that only works if the person you’re talking to has the same Apple phone that you do. If you want to buy into Apple’s world, and you can deal with AT&T as your carrier, you’ll probably be very happy.
Lyons, on the new iPhone

The most telling thing to me was Google’s tone toward Apple at the event. Instead of pretending to still be an Apple ally, Google today basically threw down the gantlet and admitted that it’s engaged in total war with Apple.

And unlike other Apple rivals, like Adobe, Google execs weren’t huffing and puffing and wringing their hands about Apple’s bad behavior. No, instead, Google was mocking Apple. Making fun of it. Laughing at it.

The Android OS is already outselling iPhone OS in the United States. Now it’s blowing past Apple in terms of the technology it’s delivering.

Yes, Apple still has a larger installed base. I was a little shocked recently when an Apple spokesbot responded to the news of Android’s outselling iPhone OS by reciting the old chestnut about Apple’s having more phones out there.

I was shocked because it’s a familiar line, one that I’ve heard countless times in my 20-plus years covering technology. But I’ve only ever heard it from companies that are doomed, and in total denial about it.