Posts tagged art
“Initially, I focused on breathing,” she recalls. “Then as I went down, I started to relax. I could see a group of human-like figures with their heads up as if they were looking up at me from below. As I got closer, I could see red, green and blue coral growing from the heads and bodies. I was amazed by the brightly colored fish swimming between the figures that were standing at the bottom of the sea. It was as if the life-sized sculptures were coming alive.” 
This dive was Shoebridge’s first encounter with the spectacular work of British-Guyanan underwater artist Jason deCaires Taylor, which has been compared to that of fellow Briton Antony Gormley (famous for the 66-foot-tall Angel of the North statue in Gateshead, England). 
An Underwater Art Scene Blossoms in the Ocean (Complete gallery) 
ZoomInfo
“Initially, I focused on breathing,” she recalls. “Then as I went down, I started to relax. I could see a group of human-like figures with their heads up as if they were looking up at me from below. As I got closer, I could see red, green and blue coral growing from the heads and bodies. I was amazed by the brightly colored fish swimming between the figures that were standing at the bottom of the sea. It was as if the life-sized sculptures were coming alive.” 
This dive was Shoebridge’s first encounter with the spectacular work of British-Guyanan underwater artist Jason deCaires Taylor, which has been compared to that of fellow Briton Antony Gormley (famous for the 66-foot-tall Angel of the North statue in Gateshead, England). 
An Underwater Art Scene Blossoms in the Ocean (Complete gallery) 
ZoomInfo
“Initially, I focused on breathing,” she recalls. “Then as I went down, I started to relax. I could see a group of human-like figures with their heads up as if they were looking up at me from below. As I got closer, I could see red, green and blue coral growing from the heads and bodies. I was amazed by the brightly colored fish swimming between the figures that were standing at the bottom of the sea. It was as if the life-sized sculptures were coming alive.” 
This dive was Shoebridge’s first encounter with the spectacular work of British-Guyanan underwater artist Jason deCaires Taylor, which has been compared to that of fellow Briton Antony Gormley (famous for the 66-foot-tall Angel of the North statue in Gateshead, England). 
An Underwater Art Scene Blossoms in the Ocean (Complete gallery) 
ZoomInfo

“Initially, I focused on breathing,” she recalls. “Then as I went down, I started to relax. I could see a group of human-like figures with their heads up as if they were looking up at me from below. As I got closer, I could see red, green and blue coral growing from the heads and bodies. I was amazed by the brightly colored fish swimming between the figures that were standing at the bottom of the sea. It was as if the life-sized sculptures were coming alive.” 

This dive was Shoebridge’s first encounter with the spectacular work of British-Guyanan underwater artist Jason deCaires Taylor, which has been compared to that of fellow Briton Antony Gormley (famous for the 66-foot-tall Angel of the North statue in Gateshead, England). 

An Underwater Art Scene Blossoms in the Ocean (Complete gallery) 

'Looking Forward' by Leslie Nichols (2010) Trained as a traditional painter, Nichols now combines texts with images to create mixed-media landscapes and portraits. Her typewriter text portraits are driven by a desire to understand different facets of women’s rights and identity as well as her place, and sense of womanhood, in her own community. Nichols creates large-scale text pieces with hand-stamped oil-based inks and stenciled graphite; smaller, more intimate pieces are produced entirely with a manual typewriter. 

A Visual History of Typewriter Art from 1893 to Today | Brain Pickings

'Looking Forward' by Leslie Nichols (2010) Trained as a traditional painter, Nichols now combines texts with images to create mixed-media landscapes and portraits. Her typewriter text portraits are driven by a desire to understand different facets of women’s rights and identity as well as her place, and sense of womanhood, in her own community. Nichols creates large-scale text pieces with hand-stamped oil-based inks and stenciled graphite; smaller, more intimate pieces are produced entirely with a manual typewriter.

A Visual History of Typewriter Art from 1893 to Today | Brain Pickings

From breathtaking murals spanning entire buildings in Poland to gorgeous calligraffiti (a mix of graffiti and typography) in remote corners of Tunisia, Google Cultural Institute’s new Street Art Project, which launched June 10, aims to capture art from the streets before it disappears forever.
The vast collection, which features over 5,000 works of art, is organized by artist, location, style and medium. The street art world map is entirely populated with images chosen by curators at 30 partnering cultural organizations in 15 different countries, including Palais de Tokyo, São Paulo Street Art and the Museum of the City of New York. In addition to mapping photos of current works, the Street Art Project provides documentation of work that is closed to the public or no longer exists. For instance, there is an entire collection devoted to the preservation of Long Island City graffiti mecca 5Pointz, which was whitewashed late last year by the building’s owners. 
MORE: World’s Street Art Finds Its Gallery With Google
ZoomInfo
From breathtaking murals spanning entire buildings in Poland to gorgeous calligraffiti (a mix of graffiti and typography) in remote corners of Tunisia, Google Cultural Institute’s new Street Art Project, which launched June 10, aims to capture art from the streets before it disappears forever.
The vast collection, which features over 5,000 works of art, is organized by artist, location, style and medium. The street art world map is entirely populated with images chosen by curators at 30 partnering cultural organizations in 15 different countries, including Palais de Tokyo, São Paulo Street Art and the Museum of the City of New York. In addition to mapping photos of current works, the Street Art Project provides documentation of work that is closed to the public or no longer exists. For instance, there is an entire collection devoted to the preservation of Long Island City graffiti mecca 5Pointz, which was whitewashed late last year by the building’s owners. 
MORE: World’s Street Art Finds Its Gallery With Google
ZoomInfo
From breathtaking murals spanning entire buildings in Poland to gorgeous calligraffiti (a mix of graffiti and typography) in remote corners of Tunisia, Google Cultural Institute’s new Street Art Project, which launched June 10, aims to capture art from the streets before it disappears forever.
The vast collection, which features over 5,000 works of art, is organized by artist, location, style and medium. The street art world map is entirely populated with images chosen by curators at 30 partnering cultural organizations in 15 different countries, including Palais de Tokyo, São Paulo Street Art and the Museum of the City of New York. In addition to mapping photos of current works, the Street Art Project provides documentation of work that is closed to the public or no longer exists. For instance, there is an entire collection devoted to the preservation of Long Island City graffiti mecca 5Pointz, which was whitewashed late last year by the building’s owners. 
MORE: World’s Street Art Finds Its Gallery With Google
ZoomInfo
From breathtaking murals spanning entire buildings in Poland to gorgeous calligraffiti (a mix of graffiti and typography) in remote corners of Tunisia, Google Cultural Institute’s new Street Art Project, which launched June 10, aims to capture art from the streets before it disappears forever.
The vast collection, which features over 5,000 works of art, is organized by artist, location, style and medium. The street art world map is entirely populated with images chosen by curators at 30 partnering cultural organizations in 15 different countries, including Palais de Tokyo, São Paulo Street Art and the Museum of the City of New York. In addition to mapping photos of current works, the Street Art Project provides documentation of work that is closed to the public or no longer exists. For instance, there is an entire collection devoted to the preservation of Long Island City graffiti mecca 5Pointz, which was whitewashed late last year by the building’s owners. 
MORE: World’s Street Art Finds Its Gallery With Google
ZoomInfo
From breathtaking murals spanning entire buildings in Poland to gorgeous calligraffiti (a mix of graffiti and typography) in remote corners of Tunisia, Google Cultural Institute’s new Street Art Project, which launched June 10, aims to capture art from the streets before it disappears forever.
The vast collection, which features over 5,000 works of art, is organized by artist, location, style and medium. The street art world map is entirely populated with images chosen by curators at 30 partnering cultural organizations in 15 different countries, including Palais de Tokyo, São Paulo Street Art and the Museum of the City of New York. In addition to mapping photos of current works, the Street Art Project provides documentation of work that is closed to the public or no longer exists. For instance, there is an entire collection devoted to the preservation of Long Island City graffiti mecca 5Pointz, which was whitewashed late last year by the building’s owners. 
MORE: World’s Street Art Finds Its Gallery With Google
ZoomInfo

From breathtaking murals spanning entire buildings in Poland to gorgeous calligraffiti (a mix of graffiti and typography) in remote corners of Tunisia, Google Cultural Institute’s new Street Art Project, which launched June 10, aims to capture art from the streets before it disappears forever.

The vast collection, which features over 5,000 works of art, is organized by artist, location, style and medium. The street art world map is entirely populated with images chosen by curators at 30 partnering cultural organizations in 15 different countries, including Palais de Tokyo, São Paulo Street Art and the Museum of the City of New York. In addition to mapping photos of current works, the Street Art Project provides documentation of work that is closed to the public or no longer exists. For instance, there is an entire collection devoted to the preservation of Long Island City graffiti mecca 5Pointz, which was whitewashed late last year by the building’s owners. 

MORE: World’s Street Art Finds Its Gallery With Google

Los Angeles artist Steve Talkowski of Sketchbot Studios Inc. has created a collection of 3D models featuring cute robots in real world situations.
He also rendered a robot version of the well-meaning demon superhero Hellboy.
Steve made the collection of original character designs for artist Dacosta Bayley‘s daily March of Robots” sketch challenge, which has recently become an artbook. You can view more of Steve’s robots on Behance.
3D Models of Cute Robots in Real World Situations [Click through to LaughingSquid for links to everything, including Steve’s portfolio.] 

Los Angeles artist Steve Talkowski of Sketchbot Studios Inc. has created a collection of 3D models featuring cute robots in real world situations.

He also rendered a robot version of the well-meaning demon superhero Hellboy.

Steve made the collection of original character designs for artist Dacosta Bayley‘s daily March of Robots” sketch challenge, which has recently become an artbook. You can view more of Steve’s robots on Behance.

3D Models of Cute Robots in Real World Situations [Click through to LaughingSquid for links to everything, including Steve’s portfolio.] 

Christo - Page - Interview

One cold winter day in 1964, I got a call from a young French woman inviting me to dinner in SoHo. Her name was Jeanne-Claude and she was married to an artist named Christo. I think they called me because Leo Castelli told them I could speak French. They had just arrived from Paris, where they created a scandal by barricading a street with barrels. Even then people called them “ChristoandJeanne-Claude,” as if the two names were one word. Later I learned they were born on the same day in the same year (June 13,1935). After a delicious dinner prepared by Jeanne-Claude of ketchup on white bread served on a paper plate, they explained how they worked, what they wanted to do, and why they were moving to New York. Already it was obvious they were two of a kind who had become one. Jeanne-Claude, a vivacious, beautiful redhead, would begin a sentence, and Christo, an intense, fast-talking fugitive from Communist Eastern Europe, would finish it in his Bulgarian-accented French, or vice-versa. 

Their story was very romantic, and the work they planned to do seemed preposterous in the mid-’60s. But they were brilliant, charismatic, generous, and funny. They were also very courageous. Even if at the time it seemed they were building castles in the air rather than art objects, it was impossible not to like them or listen to their tales of fantastic projects and voyages. Already they had figured out a way of working, conceptualizing the projects together, which Christo—an extraordinarily gifted and academically trained draftsman—would then draw. The money to realize the vast projects, which became more and more ambitious as time went on, came from the sale of Christo’s drawings and collages; but the concrete realization of the projects depended very much on Jeanne-Claude’s amazing organizational skills learned, perhaps, from her step-father, a four-star French general under de Gaulle.

Christo - Page - Interview

One cold winter day in 1964, I got a call from a young French woman inviting me to dinner in SoHo. Her name was Jeanne-Claude and she was married to an artist named Christo. I think they called me because Leo Castelli told them I could speak French. They had just arrived from Paris, where they created a scandal by barricading a street with barrels. Even then people called them “ChristoandJeanne-Claude,” as if the two names were one word. Later I learned they were born on the same day in the same year (June 13,1935). After a delicious dinner prepared by Jeanne-Claude of ketchup on white bread served on a paper plate, they explained how they worked, what they wanted to do, and why they were moving to New York. Already it was obvious they were two of a kind who had become one. Jeanne-Claude, a vivacious, beautiful redhead, would begin a sentence, and Christo, an intense, fast-talking fugitive from Communist Eastern Europe, would finish it in his Bulgarian-accented French, or vice-versa.

Their story was very romantic, and the work they planned to do seemed preposterous in the mid-’60s. But they were brilliant, charismatic, generous, and funny. They were also very courageous. Even if at the time it seemed they were building castles in the air rather than art objects, it was impossible not to like them or listen to their tales of fantastic projects and voyages. Already they had figured out a way of working, conceptualizing the projects together, which Christo—an extraordinarily gifted and academically trained draftsman—would then draw. The money to realize the vast projects, which became more and more ambitious as time went on, came from the sale of Christo’s drawings and collages; but the concrete realization of the projects depended very much on Jeanne-Claude’s amazing organizational skills learned, perhaps, from her step-father, a four-star French general under de Gaulle.