Posts tagged awesome

From Narratively’s Kickstarter page:

New York is bigger and badder, weirder and sadder, and far more uplifting and intoxicating than the news headlines would have you believe. But too many of its stories are left untold. Narratively is changing that, and then we’ll do it in your city, too. We don’t care about the breaking news or the next big headline. Narratively is devoted exclusively to sharing New York’s untold stories — the rich, in-depth narratives that get at the heart of what this city’s all about.

Way into this.

New York City needs more storytelling platforms. Your city does too. We’ve got 24 days to help Narratively reach their $50,000 goal! Go go go go.

This is ‘Tiger Girls,’ Myanmar’s first all-girl band which sings songs about freedom in a country in the midst of a political and cultural shift. They can’t play in clubs (lest the ‘Tiger Girls’ be dubbed prostitutes) so theirs is a world of radio stations and private events. Their plan? “To push the limits of the country’s censorship board,” Heidi Mitchell writes on the Beast, ”which regulates virtually everything: costumes, lyrics, dance moves, videos, album titles.” These girls are badass! Team Tiger Girls right here.

This is ‘Tiger Girls,’ Myanmar’s first all-girl band which sings songs about freedom in a country in the midst of a political and cultural shift. They can’t play in clubs (lest the ‘Tiger Girls’ be dubbed prostitutes) so theirs is a world of radio stations and private events. Their plan? “To push the limits of the country’s censorship board,” Heidi Mitchell writes on the Beast, ”which regulates virtually everything: costumes, lyrics, dance moves, videos, album titles.” These girls are badass! Team Tiger Girls right here.

thedailywhat:

Retrofuturistic Thing of the Day: French illustrator Stéphane Massa-Bidal, AKA Rétrofuturs, has designed a set of sweet vintage-style covers for nonexistent books on popular web services.
Check them out here.
[via.]

Where do we get a Newsweek one?

thedailywhat:

Retrofuturistic Thing of the Day: French illustrator Stéphane Massa-Bidal, AKA Rétrofuturs, has designed a set of sweet vintage-style covers for nonexistent books on popular web services.

Check them out here.

[via.]

Where do we get a Newsweek one?

tanya77:

themattsmith:

thegrasshopperunit:

herooftheproletariat:

Colton Harris-Moore, the barefoot boy bandit, outfoxes sheriffs
In the forests and remote islands around Seattle, police are setting traps for a barefoot teenage outlaw who has eluded them for nearly two years.
Police say 18-year-old Colton Harris-Moore, whose escapades are turning him into a folk legend, is a one-man crime wave, responsible for 50 burglaries as well as stealing light aircraft, which he taught himself to fly from video games, and several speedboats.
He lives in the woods, shuns shoes and catches his own food. His only technological aid is a pair of thermal-imaging goggles to hunt at night and his weakness is pizzas, which he asks to be delivered at the edge of the woods.
For some Harris-Moore is a modern Butch Cassidy: a surprisingly agile 6ft 5in cat burglar who thanks his victims by leaving them notes and cheeky photographs of himself, which have sold for £300 on eBay.
Thousands subscribe to his Facebook page and his image appears on T-shirts with the logo “Fly, Colton, Fly!”. Local rock groups have penned songs about him.
Hollywood producers have lodged lucrative film deals with his family and offered to pay for lawyers if he gives himself up.
Raised in a caravan on Camano Island, an isolated community in the Puget Sound, Harris-Moore started living wild at the age of seven. He would break into holiday homes, steal blankets and food and vanish into the woods for days.
In April 2008, after being sent to a juvenile detention centre, he complained that the beds were too short for his lanky frame and went on the run.
Police believe he fled to Canada and then, a few weeks ago, came back across the border to Idaho where he stole a Cessna 182 and flew to Seattle. He crash-landed in a forest clearing and walked away with cuts and bruises.
Since then he has been accused of stealing other planes for hops around the islands in the Puget Sound, including another Cessna belonging to a disc jockey who vented his frustration on radio, saying: “He still doesn’t know how to land a plane in one piece.”
He evaded a police pursuit by crashing a Mercedes-Benz into a roadside gas storage tank, using the explosion as a diversion to escape back into the woods where, he says, he feels like a Native American.
This was followed by the largest manhunt in recent memory. Three dozen sheriffs, aided by specialist armed units and an FBI helicopter, fanned out across Camano Island but failed to capture him. “We saw him, we think, but it’s like he disappeared in front of our eyes,” said one sheriff.
His luck may be about to run out. During a recent sweep a rifle shot was fired at police, raising his status to “armed and dangerous”. His mother, Pamela Kohler, now fears that even if he did not fire the shot he will be held responsible.
Kohler said she was proud her son had stolen the aircraft because he had never had a flying lesson in his life. “I was going to send him to flight school, but I guess I don’t have to,” she said. “I’d tell him the next time he took a plane: wear a parachute and practise your landing.
“If he shot that gun, it was really stupid. I don’t expect him to come out of the woods alive.”
[via]


WOW


This guy is totally in the next Twilight movie…

tanya77:

themattsmith:

thegrasshopperunit:

herooftheproletariat:

Colton Harris-Moore, the barefoot boy bandit, outfoxes sheriffs

In the forests and remote islands around Seattle, police are setting traps for a barefoot teenage outlaw who has eluded them for nearly two years.

Police say 18-year-old Colton Harris-Moore, whose escapades are turning him into a folk legend, is a one-man crime wave, responsible for 50 burglaries as well as stealing light aircraft, which he taught himself to fly from video games, and several speedboats.

He lives in the woods, shuns shoes and catches his own food. His only technological aid is a pair of thermal-imaging goggles to hunt at night and his weakness is pizzas, which he asks to be delivered at the edge of the woods.

For some Harris-Moore is a modern Butch Cassidy: a surprisingly agile 6ft 5in cat burglar who thanks his victims by leaving them notes and cheeky photographs of himself, which have sold for £300 on eBay.

Thousands subscribe to his Facebook page and his image appears on T-shirts with the logo “Fly, Colton, Fly!”. Local rock groups have penned songs about him.

Hollywood producers have lodged lucrative film deals with his family and offered to pay for lawyers if he gives himself up.

Raised in a caravan on Camano Island, an isolated community in the Puget Sound, Harris-Moore started living wild at the age of seven. He would break into holiday homes, steal blankets and food and vanish into the woods for days.

In April 2008, after being sent to a juvenile detention centre, he complained that the beds were too short for his lanky frame and went on the run.

Police believe he fled to Canada and then, a few weeks ago, came back across the border to Idaho where he stole a Cessna 182 and flew to Seattle. He crash-landed in a forest clearing and walked away with cuts and bruises.

Since then he has been accused of stealing other planes for hops around the islands in the Puget Sound, including another Cessna belonging to a disc jockey who vented his frustration on radio, saying: “He still doesn’t know how to land a plane in one piece.”

He evaded a police pursuit by crashing a Mercedes-Benz into a roadside gas storage tank, using the explosion as a diversion to escape back into the woods where, he says, he feels like a Native American.

This was followed by the largest manhunt in recent memory. Three dozen sheriffs, aided by specialist armed units and an FBI helicopter, fanned out across Camano Island but failed to capture him. “We saw him, we think, but it’s like he disappeared in front of our eyes,” said one sheriff.

His luck may be about to run out. During a recent sweep a rifle shot was fired at police, raising his status to “armed and dangerous”. His mother, Pamela Kohler, now fears that even if he did not fire the shot he will be held responsible.

Kohler said she was proud her son had stolen the aircraft because he had never had a flying lesson in his life. “I was going to send him to flight school, but I guess I don’t have to,” she said. “I’d tell him the next time he took a plane: wear a parachute and practise your landing.

“If he shot that gun, it was really stupid. I don’t expect him to come out of the woods alive.”

[via]

WOW

This guy is totally in the next Twilight movie…

andrewromano:

Early color photographs by Saul Leiter:

Saul Leiter started shooting color and black-and-white street photography in New York in the 1940s. He had no formal training in photography, but the genius of his early work was quickly acknowledged by Edward Steichen, who included Leiter in two important MoMA shows in the 1950s. MoMA’s 1957 conference “Experimental Photography in Color” featured 20 color photographs by Leiter. After that, however, Leiter’s personal color photography was, for the most part, not shared with the public. He became better-known as a successful fashion photographer in the 1950s and 60s. All the while, Leiter continued to stroll the streets wherever he was (mostly New York and Paris), making photographs for his own pleasure. He printed some of his black-and-white street photos, but kept most of his color slides tucked away in boxes. It was only in the 1990s that he began to look back at that remarkable color work and start to make prints.

andrewromano:

Early color photographs by Saul Leiter:

Saul Leiter started shooting color and black-and-white street photography in New York in the 1940s. He had no formal training in photography, but the genius of his early work was quickly acknowledged by Edward Steichen, who included Leiter in two important MoMA shows in the 1950s. MoMA’s 1957 conference “Experimental Photography in Color” featured 20 color photographs by Leiter.

After that, however, Leiter’s personal color photography was, for the most part, not shared with the public. He became better-known as a successful fashion photographer in the 1950s and 60s. All the while, Leiter continued to stroll the streets wherever he was (mostly New York and Paris), making photographs for his own pleasure. He printed some of his black-and-white street photos, but kept most of his color slides tucked away in boxes. It was only in the 1990s that he began to look back at that remarkable color work and start to make prints.

The Beach BoysAll This Is That

andrewromano:

“All This is That,” The Beach Boys (1972)

Your daily Romano

filmosophy:

Bottle Rocket (Short)

The original 13 minute version of Wes Anderson’s Bottle Rocket, which was shown at Sundance way back when.  This is the one that introduced the world to The Brothers Wilson (or, Owen and Luke at least), the one that James L. Brooks famously saw, and quickly agreed to produce as a feature-length film:

“When I first saw the thirteen-minute video I was dazzled—the language and rhythms of the piece made it clear Wes and Owen were genuine voices. The possession of a real voice is always a marvel, an almost religious thing. When you have one, it not only means you see things from a slightly different perspective than the billions of other ants on the hill, but that you also necessarily possess such equally rare qualities as integrity and humility. It’s part of the package of being a real voice, ’cause when your voice is real, you can’t screw around. The voice must be served; all other exit doors, marked “expediency” or “solid career move,” are sealed over, and the only way out of your inner torment is genuine self-expression.”

So this is, quite literally, where it all began for Wes Anderson.