Posts tagged celebrities
Inside Angelina Jolie’s campaign for justice for the survivors of Bosnia’s mass rapes
Edina, a Bosnian who lives near Srebrenica, was only 15 when she was captured along with a relative as they were foraging for food. Her family had fled to a forest. She was held for weeks and raped by five men. She says she survived because as it was happening, “I felt like I was someone else watching what was happening to me.”
In the two decades since those events, Edina has tried to rebuild her life. Today, she is a mother, but she has the air of a broken woman. She sits on a bench in the Srebrenica Memorial and chats with visitors—including Angelina Jolie—with dulled emotions. Although Edina testified in The Hague in 2005, none of the men who raped her have been brought to justice. She says that her rapists walk free—and are living not far from where she now lives.
"I know who they are," she tells Newsweek. "I found them on the Internet on Facebook."
Jolie, the actress and director, has returned to Bosnia with British Foreign Secretary William Hague to promote their partnership directed at preventing sexual violence in conflict. Rape during wartime is often treated as a lesser war crime, and their initiative is an attempt to galvanize political will to uphold international standards of justice.

Inside Angelina Jolie’s campaign for justice for the survivors of Bosnia’s mass rapes

Edina, a Bosnian who lives near Srebrenica, was only 15 when she was captured along with a relative as they were foraging for food. Her family had fled to a forest. She was held for weeks and raped by five men. She says she survived because as it was happening, “I felt like I was someone else watching what was happening to me.”

In the two decades since those events, Edina has tried to rebuild her life. Today, she is a mother, but she has the air of a broken woman. She sits on a bench in the Srebrenica Memorial and chats with visitors—including Angelina Jolie—with dulled emotions. Although Edina testified in The Hague in 2005, none of the men who raped her have been brought to justice. She says that her rapists walk free—and are living not far from where she now lives.

"I know who they are," she tells Newsweek. "I found them on the Internet on Facebook."

Jolie, the actress and director, has returned to Bosnia with British Foreign Secretary William Hague to promote their partnership directed at preventing sexual violence in conflict. Rape during wartime is often treated as a lesser war crime, and their initiative is an attempt to galvanize political will to uphold international standards of justice.

Lady Gaga’s Charity Spent Ten Times More on Social Media Than Charity Its First Year

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lady Gaga’s album-themed charity only gave out $5,000 in grants in 2012, after spending $1.85 million on lawyer, PR and social media fees. As the New York Post gleefully reported Wednesday, the Born This Way Foundation’s tax filings show several five- and six-figure fees for things like legal costs ($406,552), publicity ($58,678), social media ($50,000) and “philanthropic consulting” ($150,000). The tax forms don’t, however, say where the funds came from — and in 2011 Gaga announced that she would front the bulk of the money for the foundation when it launched the next year.

Lady Gaga’s Charity Spent Ten Times More on Social Media Than Charity Its First Year

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lady Gaga’s album-themed charity only gave out $5,000 in grants in 2012, after spending $1.85 million on lawyer, PR and social media fees. As the New York Post gleefully reported Wednesday, the Born This Way Foundation’s tax filings show several five- and six-figure fees for things like legal costs ($406,552), publicity ($58,678), social media ($50,000) and “philanthropic consulting” ($150,000). The tax forms don’t, however, say where the funds came from — and in 2011 Gaga announced that she would front the bulk of the money for the foundation when it launched the next year.

Last week, Newsweek interviewed Tamara Green, one of 13 women who accused Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually assaulting them in a civil lawsuit brought by Andrea Constand in 2004, and settled under undisclosed terms in 2006. 

Now, a second woman is speaking out: Barbara Bowman, a 46-year-old artist who says Cosby took her under his wing in the late ‘80s, when she was a teenager — and repeatedly emotionally and physically abused her. Both Bowman and Green joined the 2004 lawsuit as witnesses after hearing about it on television; neither had anything to gain financially, as the statute of limitations had expired for both of them. 

Barbara Bowman Speaks About Bill Cosby Sexual Abuse Allegations

Last week, Newsweek interviewed Tamara Green, one of 13 women who accused Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually assaulting them in a civil lawsuit brought by Andrea Constand in 2004, and settled under undisclosed terms in 2006.

Now, a second woman is speaking out: Barbara Bowman, a 46-year-old artist who says Cosby took her under his wing in the late ‘80s, when she was a teenager — and repeatedly emotionally and physically abused her. Both Bowman and Green joined the 2004 lawsuit as witnesses after hearing about it on television; neither had anything to gain financially, as the statute of limitations had expired for both of them.

Barbara Bowman Speaks About Bill Cosby Sexual Abuse Allegations

Multiple women have accused Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually assaulting them. Cosby has repeatedly denied the allegations, and settled a 2006 lawsuit that included 13 accusers.
Newsweek spoke to one of those women, Tamara Green, a former trial attorney now living in Southern California who says Cosby assaulted her in the 1970s; she only came forward in 2005, after hearing about some of his other alleged victims. Green talked candidly about how her confession was a “career-ender,” and about how difficult it can be for women who accuse powerful men of sexual assault. 

Multiple women have accused Bill Cosby of drugging and sexually assaulting them. Cosby has repeatedly denied the allegations, and settled a 2006 lawsuit that included 13 accusers.

Newsweek spoke to one of those women, Tamara Green, a former trial attorney now living in Southern California who says Cosby assaulted her in the 1970s; she only came forward in 2005, after hearing about some of his other alleged victims. Green talked candidly about how her confession was a “career-ender,” and about how difficult it can be for women who accuse powerful men of sexual assault. 

Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo
Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image). We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 
ZoomInfo

Thanks to dedicated Marilyn Monroe fan Tony Gualtieri, we’ve been able to see a number of older Newsweek covers from his incredible collection (bottom image).

We’ve added our newest cover, from the ‘Lost Scrapbook’ special edition magazine currently on sale in Walmart & Barnes & Noble stores, ahead of our return to print sometime this spring. 

(Source: Newsweek)

In this week’s Newsweek Alison Samuels explains why no one could save Whitney Houston, who died at 48, from herself.
An excerpt:

Houston wrestled with demons, drugs, and heartbreaking betrayals that continued to haunt her even after her lifeless, bloated body was found face down in a bathtub at the Beverly Hilton on the eve of the Grammys. Autopsy results revealed just how much self-inflicted damage Houston had done in her 48 years. The scalding bath water had burned her face, and there were bruises on her forehead, chest, and upper lip and numerous scars on her body. Years of cocaine use had burned a hole through her septum, she had heart disease, and toxicology tests showed residue of marijuana, Xanax, Benadryl, and other medications in her system.

Whitney Houston’s Private Hell and Inevitable Death, Newsweek

In this week’s Newsweek Alison Samuels explains why no one could save Whitney Houston, who died at 48, from herself.

An excerpt:

Houston wrestled with demons, drugs, and heartbreaking betrayals that continued to haunt her even after her lifeless, bloated body was found face down in a bathtub at the Beverly Hilton on the eve of the Grammys. Autopsy results revealed just how much self-inflicted damage Houston had done in her 48 years. The scalding bath water had burned her face, and there were bruises on her forehead, chest, and upper lip and numerous scars on her body. Years of cocaine use had burned a hole through her septum, she had heart disease, and toxicology tests showed residue of marijuana, Xanax, Benadryl, and other medications in her system.

Whitney Houston’s Private Hell and Inevitable Death, Newsweek

Hey Tumblr, I made a Cage Worm on my new favorite website, niccagehead! What magical mystery creatures can you drum up? Go play.

Hey Tumblr, I made a Cage Worm on my new favorite website, niccagehead! What magical mystery creatures can you drum up? Go play.