Posts tagged civil rights
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo

On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.

Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.

A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.

Today in Things We Are Not Surprised to Read, But Nevertheless Somehow Are

Ellis Cose reads the GAO’s report on civil rights during the Bush years:

After sizing up the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice—the most powerful advocate for civil rights within the federal government—Bush’s operatives endeavored “to rip the heart out of [it],” in the words of Ben Jealous, president of the NAACP.
In dry statistics and even drier prose, a report released last week by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) spells out how sweeping that effort became. The Voting Section of the Civil Rights Division veered away from challenging “at-large election systems” that marginalized African-Americans and focused on language discrimination against Spanish speakers. The Employment Litigation Section moved away from so-called pattern or practice cases (suits that took on widespread or systematic discrimination) in favor of individual complaints. (“Plenty of individual lawyers can bring these individual discrimination cases,” pointed out Alan Jenkins, executive director of The Opportunity Agenda, a New York–based nonprofit; but only the Justice Department can pursue certain big cases that can make a real difference.) Bush’s Justice Department was also particularly sensitive to discrimination against white males. In 2007 the division filed a suit against Indianapolis for favoring African-Americans and females over white males for promotion to police sergeant.