Posts tagged covers
Hey tumblr!
As the immigration debate rages in Washington and Congress pushes for a $46.3 billion border-security surge, undocumented immigrants continue to perish in Arizona’s harsh wilderness. In this week’s Newsweek, Terry Greene Sterling tells the story of one mother’s attempt to bring her family to America.
Want to chat immigration and learn a little about the militarization of America’s southern border? 
Join your nwktumblr and the author of the piece for a live Q&A at 1pm et tomorrow.  You can submit your questions right now by adding a comment w/ reblog, sending us an Ask message, tweeting to @Newsweek with the hashtag #DeathOnTheBorder, or emailing dailybeastsubmit@gmail.com. We’ll check ‘em all!
We’d really love to see some tumblrs in there, so do put 1pm et in your calendars and flag this Q&A page.

Hey tumblr!

As the immigration debate rages in Washington and Congress pushes for a $46.3 billion border-security surge, undocumented immigrants continue to perish in Arizona’s harsh wilderness. In this week’s Newsweek, Terry Greene Sterling tells the story of one mother’s attempt to bring her family to America.

Want to chat immigration and learn a little about the militarization of America’s southern border?

Join your nwktumblr and the author of the piece for a live Q&A at 1pm et tomorrow.  You can submit your questions right now by adding a comment w/ reblog, sending us an Ask message, tweeting to @Newsweek with the hashtag #DeathOnTheBorder, or emailing dailybeastsubmit@gmail.com. We’ll check ‘em all!

We’d really love to see some tumblrs in there, so do put 1pm et in your calendars and flag this Q&A page.

nwkarchivist:

75 Years Ago, The 75th Anniversary Of Gettysburg

Love that coverline font. It’s like a silent movie!

nwkarchivist:

75 Years Ago, The 75th Anniversary Of Gettysburg

Love that coverline font. It’s like a silent movie!


Two incomplete, sun-whitened human skeletons lie spoon-fashion beneath a drought-stunted Palo Verde tree in the Arizona desert. Animals-most likely pack rats, coyotes, and buzzards-have strewn ribs and vertebrae and other bones along a wide swath of beige sand. Scattered among the remains are a few Mexican coins, an orange comb, a toothbrush, a short-sleeved polo shirt, a zip-up blue jacket, a pair of jeans, a pair of blue panties and bra, a single green sock, a crocheted collar adorned with fake pearls and garnets, a purple and white backpack, and a complete set of upper and lower false teeth with a yellow metal star on the right front tooth.It’s February 12, 2012, and Border Patrol agents stumble upon the grim scene while on a routine patrol about nine miles north of the Mexican line on the Tohono O’odham Nation reservation, near Sells, Arizona. The agents take a GPS reading and notify Detective Juan Gonzales of the Tohono O’odham Police Department, which has jurisdiction over the investigation of deaths on tribal lands. They then head back out into the unforgiving desert.

Thus begins this week’s enthralling cover story from Terry Greene Sterling, Death on the Border. 

Two incomplete, sun-whitened human skeletons lie spoon-fashion beneath a drought-stunted Palo Verde tree in the Arizona desert. Animals-most likely pack rats, coyotes, and buzzards-have strewn ribs and vertebrae and other bones along a wide swath of beige sand. Scattered among the remains are a few Mexican coins, an orange comb, a toothbrush, a short-sleeved polo shirt, a zip-up blue jacket, a pair of jeans, a pair of blue panties and bra, a single green sock, a crocheted collar adorned with fake pearls and garnets, a purple and white backpack, and a complete set of upper and lower false teeth with a yellow metal star on the right front tooth.

It’s February 12, 2012, and Border Patrol agents stumble upon the grim scene while on a routine patrol about nine miles north of the Mexican line on the Tohono O’odham Nation reservation, near Sells, Arizona. The agents take a GPS reading and notify Detective Juan Gonzales of the Tohono O’odham Police Department, which has jurisdiction over the investigation of deaths on tribal lands. They then head back out into the unforgiving desert.

Thus begins this week’s enthralling cover story from Terry Greene Sterling, Death on the Border

Emphasis ours: “‘It’s amazing to witness how attitudes on gay rights have evolved in my lifetime,’ said Jack Hunter, the artist behind next week’s cover, ‘Moment of Joy.’ Hunter, who originally submitted his image, unsolicited, to a Tumblr, continued, ‘This is great for our kids, a moment we can all celebrate.’”
June Thomas, however, writing at Slate, says this is a terrible way to commemorate a major civil rights victory. “Bert and Ernie clearly love each other,” she says. “But does Ernie suck Bert’s cock? I don’t think so.”
Gawker notes the tumblr it was submitted to, Blown Covers, which is run by the daughter of the New Yorker’s art director, is “currently down.” 

Emphasis ours: “‘It’s amazing to witness how attitudes on gay rights have evolved in my lifetime,’ said Jack Hunter, the artist behind next week’s cover, ‘Moment of Joy.’ Hunter, who originally submitted his image, unsolicited, to a Tumblr, continued, ‘This is great for our kids, a moment we can all celebrate.’”

June Thomas, however, writing at Slate, says this is a terrible way to commemorate a major civil rights victory. “Bert and Ernie clearly love each other,” she says. “But does Ernie suck Bert’s cock? I don’t think so.”

Gawker notes the tumblr it was submitted to, Blown Covers, which is run by the daughter of the New Yorker’s art director, is “currently down.” 

This week’s cover story—Kill Zone—says gun control isn’t about rights in America’s cities. It’s about survival.
A preview:

SUMMER IS the killing season in American cities. The temperature rises and, yes, tempers do, too. And many young men who might have been in school are out in the streets taunting, hunting, and shooting at each other. Collateral carnage like the slaughter of Tyquran’s mother is inevitable, and for many innocents it’s inescapable in neighborhoods where young guys spray bullets. In Los Angeles County, with an estimated 450 gangs that have 45,000 members, about half the murders are gang related. Young men get shot again and again, and those who survive show a calm pride when they’re wheeled into the trauma units. As a wide-eyed British correspondent reported last week, the doctors call them “frequent fliers.” In Chicago, gang and gun violence is endemic, with 12 shootings last weekend and one death. And in New York, although the murder rate is much lower than the other cities, in the rougher parts of town that’s no guarantee of immunity. Between Friday and Sunday the first weekend in June, 26 people were shot and seven of them killed.
Over the last few months I’ve spent time with the New York Police Department and alone in parts of the city where guns are a way of life, but not in the way that pro-gun-rights partisans usually mean. I met kids like Tyquran and cops like Deputy Chief Theresa Shortell, head of the department’s fast-growing gangs division. And something that ought to be obvious kept hitting me. The embattled streets of the city and the gunland of the heartland are wildly different places, and the failure to understand that difference, and overcome it, is the great American tragedy of our time.

Read Christopher Dickey’s cover story (and take a look at his tumblr while you’re at it!).

This week’s cover story—Kill Zone—says gun control isn’t about rights in America’s cities. It’s about survival.

A preview:

SUMMER IS the killing season in American cities. The temperature rises and, yes, tempers do, too. And many young men who might have been in school are out in the streets taunting, hunting, and shooting at each other. Collateral carnage like the slaughter of Tyquran’s mother is inevitable, and for many innocents it’s inescapable in neighborhoods where young guys spray bullets. In Los Angeles County, with an estimated 450 gangs that have 45,000 members, about half the murders are gang related. Young men get shot again and again, and those who survive show a calm pride when they’re wheeled into the trauma units. As a wide-eyed British correspondent reported last week, the doctors call them “frequent fliers.” In Chicago, gang and gun violence is endemic, with 12 shootings last weekend and one death. And in New York, although the murder rate is much lower than the other cities, in the rougher parts of town that’s no guarantee of immunity. Between Friday and Sunday the first weekend in June, 26 people were shot and seven of them killed.

Over the last few months I’ve spent time with the New York Police Department and alone in parts of the city where guns are a way of life, but not in the way that pro-gun-rights partisans usually mean. I met kids like Tyquran and cops like Deputy Chief Theresa Shortell, head of the department’s fast-growing gangs division. And something that ought to be obvious kept hitting me. The embattled streets of the city and the gunland of the heartland are wildly different places, and the failure to understand that difference, and overcome it, is the great American tragedy of our time.

Read Christopher Dickey’s cover story (and take a look at his tumblr while you’re at it!).

This week’s animated Newsweek cover, as seen in the iPad app, features a morphing King Richard III—from legend…to reality!

The cover story, written by historian Simon Schama, looks back at the means Richard III used to create his rock-solid center of power and loyalty—that undid him in the end.

Below, check out an excerpt. You can read the story online or in the iPad app, available in the App Store today.

A king, one shoulder higher than the other (an armorer’s nightmare), the golden circlet of the crown upon his helmet, is fighting for his life and his throne. Seeing the odds of a victory, which should have been his for the taking, suddenly shorten when his vanguard flounders in marshy ground, he has made a gambler’s throw: a frontal charge at the enemy with a long column of his most loyal knights behind him, meant to smash its way to his rival and kill him. The wet ground has lost him his mount, but he is cutting his way through the bodies with a swinging battle ax. He makes for the standard bearer of the enemy, fells him. Surely, the Welshman, the Tudor who wants his crown, cannot be far behind. Another swing, another knight, much bigger than his own slight frame, goes crashing down in his clanking hardware. Now Richard is within feet of his quarry when it all goes wrong. A presumed ally, his troops held in reserve, perhaps sensing the shift in the day’s fortunes, has thrown in his lot with the enemy and is attacking his rear; his scarlet-coated men throwing themselves into the fray. Everyone, all those men groaning and stumbling and hacking in the soft ground, feels the beginning of the end. Ranks of them close in on the king from whose helm the crown has ominously fallen. Defying everything and everyone, the king swings and flails, is engulfed, and a halberd slices through his helmet and into his brain. He sinks and folds and it is over. It is always finished when the leader of an army loses his life, for these thousands of men, knights and hardened men at arms, archers and gunners (for there were both cannon and harquebuses on Bosworth Field) are not fighting for an idea or a country, but for the person of the king who, in some way they don’t ask themselves, is England.

The chronicles of the late 15th and early 16th centuries have told us this, but those histories were written either by, or to please, the victors. But now we have Richard III’s story as written on his bones: a forensic romance. Not just the deep cleft in his skull where the halberd penetrated the helmet, but the marks of the subsequent indignities and mutilations inflicted on his corpse. It was always known that the new king, Henry Tudor, made sure to expose Richard’s body for either two or three days (sources differ) in Greyfriars Abbey where it was deposited, and it may have been, as one of the histories describes, half-naked, its lower half covered merely by “a poor black cloth”—the ultimate humiliation for a king who had reveled in royal costume. The skeleton shows signs of lunging stab wounds through the right buttock, another targeted indignity and, more mysteriously, the body’s feet are missing. Most dramatically of all, the backbone is curved like the blade of a scythe: the sign of “idiopathic” scoliosis, a condition that would have come upon the prince, Richard, as a boy and which would have thrust one shoulder up high enough for critics during and after his life to jeer at the deformity. Thomas More, whose unfinished biography is the first thrilling work of historical narrative—more a novel than a true history—and Shakespeare, who drew on More, may have been unjust in making Richard a monster, and there is no sign of the withered arm at the center of one of More’s most dramatic and fanciful scenes. But the bones tell us they were right to picture Richard III as deformed, and entirely of their time to imagine what effect this might have on the self-consciousness of a noble steeped in the chivalric literature of manly perfection, and on those many who feared and hated him.

The Return of Ruthless Richard III, Newsweek

This week’s Newsweek cover: Hil! She’s "the most powerful woman in American history," per our coverline. 
Here’s the beginning of the cover story, you can read the whole thing on the website if you’d like:

And now, as of this week, Hillary Rodham Clinton becomes something she has not been in two decades: a private citizen. A mind-boggling thought, really, rich in amusingly prosaic implications. Will she drive a car? Is she going to pop up at the Safeway (you’re supposed to bring your own bags now, Madame Secretary!) or be found standing in line at the Friendship Heights multiplex? She’ll still have Secret Service protection, and she has more than enough money to send other people out on a CVS run. But even so, she is now, for the first time in a very, very long time, just one of us.
The images amuse because, of course, she’s not just one of us. She’s been the most famous and admired woman in America for 20 years. A December Gallup poll had her as the most admired woman in the world, and No. 2 on the list (Michelle Obama) wasn’t remotely close. Not everyone is in on this love-fest, as we well know, by a long shot. But even the seething hatred has, over the years, embroidered her legend—debates about Clinton have somehow always ended up really being about us as a nation, who we are and who we want to be, in such a way that even those who dislike her are implicitly acknowledging that, yes, she is the touchstone.
She’s the most important woman in America. More: she is almost certainly the most important woman in all of our political history. Already, even if this retirement proves to be permanent, which few people think it will be. No? Well, who, then? Who has been first lady, senator, secretary of state? No other woman, that’s for sure. Not many men have held as many high-profile jobs and performed them as well.
And on top of the jobs themselves—in a way, far harder than the jobs themselves—was having to be that barrier breaker, having to be The Woman; the little daughter of a starchy Republican drapery-peddler who would cash in her Goldwater chips and whom fate would eventually select to embody liberation and insolence and cultural transformation, transformation that millions of Americans embraced but that a different set of millions found ruinous, repulsive; having to carry all that on her shoulders, year after year after year, watching people call her all kinds of names and accuse her of all manner of treachery (up to and including criminal behavior and sympathy with terrorists), all that on top of just the normal run-of-the-mill sexism, and knowing that she had to stay above it all and smile, smile, smile, and never take the bait? An impossible job. Who else has had to do all that? 

Hillary Clinton Exits Politics: Her Enduring Legacy, Newsweek 

This week’s Newsweek cover: Hil! She’s "the most powerful woman in American history," per our coverline.

Here’s the beginning of the cover story, you can read the whole thing on the website if you’d like:

And now, as of this week, Hillary Rodham Clinton becomes something she has not been in two decades: a private citizen. A mind-boggling thought, really, rich in amusingly prosaic implications. Will she drive a car? Is she going to pop up at the Safeway (you’re supposed to bring your own bags now, Madame Secretary!) or be found standing in line at the Friendship Heights multiplex? She’ll still have Secret Service protection, and she has more than enough money to send other people out on a CVS run. But even so, she is now, for the first time in a very, very long time, just one of us.

The images amuse because, of course, she’s not just one of us. She’s been the most famous and admired woman in America for 20 years. A December Gallup poll had her as the most admired woman in the world, and No. 2 on the list (Michelle Obama) wasn’t remotely close. Not everyone is in on this love-fest, as we well know, by a long shot. But even the seething hatred has, over the years, embroidered her legend—debates about Clinton have somehow always ended up really being about us as a nation, who we are and who we want to be, in such a way that even those who dislike her are implicitly acknowledging that, yes, she is the touchstone.

She’s the most important woman in America. More: she is almost certainly the most important woman in all of our political history. Already, even if this retirement proves to be permanent, which few people think it will be. No? Well, who, then? Who has been first lady, senator, secretary of state? No other woman, that’s for sure. Not many men have held as many high-profile jobs and performed them as well.

And on top of the jobs themselves—in a way, far harder than the jobs themselves—was having to be that barrier breaker, having to be The Woman; the little daughter of a starchy Republican drapery-peddler who would cash in her Goldwater chips and whom fate would eventually select to embody liberation and insolence and cultural transformation, transformation that millions of Americans embraced but that a different set of millions found ruinous, repulsive; having to carry all that on her shoulders, year after year after year, watching people call her all kinds of names and accuse her of all manner of treachery (up to and including criminal behavior and sympathy with terrorists), all that on top of just the normal run-of-the-mill sexism, and knowing that she had to stay above it all and smile, smile, smile, and never take the bait? An impossible job. Who else has had to do all that? 

Hillary Clinton Exits Politics: Her Enduring Legacy, Newsweek