Posts tagged crisis
Sierra Leone’s Leading Ebola Doctor Contracts Ebola
The doctor at the forefront of Sierra Leone’s fight against the unprecedented Ebola outbreak in the region has contracted Ebola himself, Reuters reported Wednesday.
As of this week, Ebola has claimed 632 lives in three West African countries, according to the World Health Organization. Virologist Sheik Umar Khan, 39, has treated more than 100 victims of the disease. Sierra Leone Health Minister Miatta Kargbo called him a “national hero” and said she would “do anything and everything in my power to ensure he survives,” according to Reuters.
Last month, Khan told Reuters that he was aware of the risk of himself contracting the disease, which kills up to 90 percent of those infected. “I am afraid for my life, I must say, because I cherish my life,” he said. “Health workers are prone to the disease because we are the first port of call for somebody who is sickened by disease. Even with the full protective clothing you put on, you are at risk.”

Sierra Leone’s Leading Ebola Doctor Contracts Ebola

The doctor at the forefront of Sierra Leone’s fight against the unprecedented Ebola outbreak in the region has contracted Ebola himself, Reuters reported Wednesday.

As of this week, Ebola has claimed 632 lives in three West African countries, according to the World Health Organization. Virologist Sheik Umar Khan, 39, has treated more than 100 victims of the disease. Sierra Leone Health Minister Miatta Kargbo called him a “national hero” and said she would “do anything and everything in my power to ensure he survives,” according to Reuters.

Last month, Khan told Reuters that he was aware of the risk of himself contracting the disease, which kills up to 90 percent of those infected. “I am afraid for my life, I must say, because I cherish my life,” he said. “Health workers are prone to the disease because we are the first port of call for somebody who is sickened by disease. Even with the full protective clothing you put on, you are at risk.”

As Jennay Ghowrwal and her brother prepared to leave their mother’s house in Bethesda, Maryland, in March 2011, they got ready for an ugly conversation. 

For nearly two years, the Ghowrwals’ 65-year-old mother had been living alone with untreated schizophrenia. She refused medication. She wouldn’t see a doctor. 

The Ghowrwals’ Sunday visits were a critical part of the makeshift care system they’d created around their mother. And it was where they gave her a weekly allowance. 

“That was the worst part,” says Jennay Ghowrwal, 28. “She always asked for more than she was going to get.” 

But that spring afternoon, their mother’s demands were more extreme than usual. She demanded $2,000 because, she said, she needed a haircut. Frustrated, and weary of her mother’s emotional instability, Ghowrwal refused. “I said, ‘No, mom. I’m sorry. We can’t give you that.’” 

Her mother went quiet. When she started to talk, her speech was quick and difficult to decipher. The CIA was after her. Her kids were out to get her. “If I can’t have control over my life, then they can’t either,” she screamed through tears. 

Then she grabbed a box of matches from the kitchen table, and lit one. As the match burned in her mother’s fingers, Ghowrwal remembers being relieved, thinking: “Finally. The moment we’ve been waiting for.” 

In the last several years, national tragedies like the shootings in Newtown have put pressure on the US government to improve access to mental health treatment. This weekend’s violence in Santa Barbara has reignited the issue. But behind these headline-grabbing mass killings is a much broader crisis. 

America’s mental health care crisis: families left to fill the void of a broken system | World | The Guardian

As Jennay Ghowrwal and her brother prepared to leave their mother’s house in Bethesda, Maryland, in March 2011, they got ready for an ugly conversation.

For nearly two years, the Ghowrwals’ 65-year-old mother had been living alone with untreated schizophrenia. She refused medication. She wouldn’t see a doctor.

The Ghowrwals’ Sunday visits were a critical part of the makeshift care system they’d created around their mother. And it was where they gave her a weekly allowance.

“That was the worst part,” says Jennay Ghowrwal, 28. “She always asked for more than she was going to get.”

But that spring afternoon, their mother’s demands were more extreme than usual. She demanded $2,000 because, she said, she needed a haircut. Frustrated, and weary of her mother’s emotional instability, Ghowrwal refused. “I said, ‘No, mom. I’m sorry. We can’t give you that.’”

Her mother went quiet. When she started to talk, her speech was quick and difficult to decipher. The CIA was after her. Her kids were out to get her. “If I can’t have control over my life, then they can’t either,” she screamed through tears.

Then she grabbed a box of matches from the kitchen table, and lit one. As the match burned in her mother’s fingers, Ghowrwal remembers being relieved, thinking: “Finally. The moment we’ve been waiting for.”

In the last several years, national tragedies like the shootings in Newtown have put pressure on the US government to improve access to mental health treatment. This weekend’s violence in Santa Barbara has reignited the issue. But behind these headline-grabbing mass killings is a much broader crisis.

America’s mental health care crisis: families left to fill the void of a broken system | World | The Guardian

Fighting dirty: Behind Boxing’s Brain Damage Crisis

At 46, “Terrible” Terry Norris has the lean, muscled frame of a former pro boxer. He’s just a little taller than average, with a thick, black Van Dyke framing a bright smile. 

Gray creeps in at the edges of his beard, but his shaved head seems the only concession to age, a paring away of the intricately razored box cut of his heyday, now some 20 years gone. 

These days, he teaches cardio boxing in a converted garage north of Hollywood; upstairs, he shares a loft with his wife, Tanya, who also teaches and runs his gym.

 During classes he looks fit and powerful, his fists still preternaturally fast. Only when he speaks, in a low, raspy murmur bordering on unintelligible, do you wonder at the damage he’s suffered.

He started boxing when he was nine years old, a black kid growing up in Lubbock, Texas, a conservative, predominantly white industrial city best known as the birthplace of Buddy Holly. His mother wanted to keep her mischievous son, “Terrible,” off the streets; his father was a former fighter. 

At 19 he turned pro. World Boxing Council light-middleweight champion at 22. Three more titles followed; he finished his career at 47-9, with 31 knockouts, and joined the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

Fighting dirty: Behind Boxing’s Brain Damage Crisis

At 46, “Terrible” Terry Norris has the lean, muscled frame of a former pro boxer. He’s just a little taller than average, with a thick, black Van Dyke framing a bright smile.

Gray creeps in at the edges of his beard, but his shaved head seems the only concession to age, a paring away of the intricately razored box cut of his heyday, now some 20 years gone.

These days, he teaches cardio boxing in a converted garage north of Hollywood; upstairs, he shares a loft with his wife, Tanya, who also teaches and runs his gym.

During classes he looks fit and powerful, his fists still preternaturally fast. Only when he speaks, in a low, raspy murmur bordering on unintelligible, do you wonder at the damage he’s suffered.

He started boxing when he was nine years old, a black kid growing up in Lubbock, Texas, a conservative, predominantly white industrial city best known as the birthplace of Buddy Holly. His mother wanted to keep her mischievous son, “Terrible,” off the streets; his father was a former fighter.

At 19 he turned pro. World Boxing Council light-middleweight champion at 22. Three more titles followed; he finished his career at 47-9, with 31 knockouts, and joined the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

Frontiers Without Medicine

It did not take long for the infant to die. A half hour after her parents brought her into the makeshift emergency room lit by hazy flashlights, she was gone. 

The 26-year-old doctor, a third-year resident, worked frantically over her lifeless body. He had not slept for a day, but he was determined to save her life. The doctor, who goes by just the name Dr. Hamza, lost the battle. 

After a few minutes’ resuscitation, the girl died. The doctor wrapped a triangular cloth around the small corpse. Her mother slumped on a chair, in shock. Her father paced the room. 

They had not yet named her. This baby did not die of shrapnel wounds or a sniper’s bullet. She died from a respiratory illness. 

According to the charity Save the Children, the majority of children’s diseases in Syria-measles, diarrhea and respiratory illnesses-are treatable. 

"When I see a wizened dead baby," said one U.N. officer. "I think: did they really die of starvation? Or did they die of some horrible disease? Or even a treatable one they can’t get drugs for?" 

Sixty percent of the hospitals in Syria are damaged or destroyed; half the doctors have fled the country. Medicine is heading backward several centuries.

Frontiers Without Medicine

It did not take long for the infant to die. A half hour after her parents brought her into the makeshift emergency room lit by hazy flashlights, she was gone.

The 26-year-old doctor, a third-year resident, worked frantically over her lifeless body. He had not slept for a day, but he was determined to save her life. The doctor, who goes by just the name Dr. Hamza, lost the battle.

After a few minutes’ resuscitation, the girl died. The doctor wrapped a triangular cloth around the small corpse. Her mother slumped on a chair, in shock. Her father paced the room.

They had not yet named her. This baby did not die of shrapnel wounds or a sniper’s bullet. She died from a respiratory illness.

According to the charity Save the Children, the majority of children’s diseases in Syria-measles, diarrhea and respiratory illnesses-are treatable.

"When I see a wizened dead baby," said one U.N. officer. "I think: did they really die of starvation? Or did they die of some horrible disease? Or even a treatable one they can’t get drugs for?"

Sixty percent of the hospitals in Syria are damaged or destroyed; half the doctors have fled the country. Medicine is heading backward several centuries.

This week’s cover features a very average-looking Jesus Christ, whose cover line urges we follow him—and ditch the church. The cover story is written by Andrew Sullivan, who who argues that Christianity in America is “in crisis,” as political issues like contraception, health care, and abortion have been usurped by religious thinking, and the kind of Christianity that is most essential and pure has been lost. 
Here’s an excerpt (full story online and on newsstands tomorrow AM): 

It seems no accident to me that so many Christians now embrace materialist self-help rather than ascetic self-denial—or that most Catholics, even regular churchgoers, have tuned out the hierarchy in embarrassment or disgust. Given this crisis, it is no surprise that the fastest-growing segment of belief among the young is atheism, which has leapt in popularity in the new millennium. Nor is it a shock that so many have turned away from organized Christianity and toward “spirituality,” co-opting or adapting the practices of meditation or yoga, or wandering as lapsed Catholics in an inquisitive spiritual desert. The thirst for God is still there. How could it not be, when the profoundest human questions—Why does the universe exist rather than nothing? How did humanity come to be on this remote blue speck of a planet? What happens to us after death?—remain as pressing and mysterious as they’ve always been?  That’s why polls show a huge majority of Americans still believing in a Higher Power. But the need for new questioning—of Christian institutions as well as ideas and priorities—is as real as the crisis is deep.

Update: Cover story writer Andrew Sullivan will host a live Q&A Tuesday at 2pm ET if you’d like to join and discuss the piece.

This week’s cover features a very average-looking Jesus Christ, whose cover line urges we follow him—and ditch the church. The cover story is written by Andrew Sullivan, who who argues that Christianity in America is “in crisis,” as political issues like contraception, health care, and abortion have been usurped by religious thinking, and the kind of Christianity that is most essential and pure has been lost. 

Here’s an excerpt (full story online and on newsstands tomorrow AM): 

It seems no accident to me that so many Christians now embrace materialist self-help rather than ascetic self-denial—or that most Catholics, even regular churchgoers, have tuned out the hierarchy in embarrassment or disgust. Given this crisis, it is no surprise that the fastest-growing segment of belief among the young is atheism, which has leapt in popularity in the new millennium. Nor is it a shock that so many have turned away from organized Christianity and toward “spirituality,” co-opting or adapting the practices of meditation or yoga, or wandering as lapsed Catholics in an inquisitive spiritual desert. The thirst for God is still there. How could it not be, when the profoundest human questions—Why does the universe exist rather than nothing? How did humanity come to be on this remote blue speck of a planet? What happens to us after death?—remain as pressing and mysterious as they’ve always been?  That’s why polls show a huge majority of Americans still believing in a Higher Power. But the need for new questioning—of Christian institutions as well as ideas and priorities—is as real as the crisis is deep.

Update: Cover story writer Andrew Sullivan will host a live Q&A Tuesday at 2pm ET if you’d like to join and discuss the piece.