Posts tagged design
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo

On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.

Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.

A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.

Created by London-based industrial design students Rodrigo García González, Pierre Paslier, and Guillaume Couche, the Ooho is a blob-like water container made out of an edible algae membrane. 

The design is inspired by how liquid drops form and how egg yolks work. The container is created using a culinary technique called “spherification” and the water is held inside by a double gelatinous membrane. The gel around the water is created from brown algae and calcium chloride. 

MORE: Edible Water Bottle Could Save The Planet

Created by London-based industrial design students Rodrigo García González, Pierre Paslier, and Guillaume Couche, the Ooho is a blob-like water container made out of an edible algae membrane.

The design is inspired by how liquid drops form and how egg yolks work. The container is created using a culinary technique called “spherification” and the water is held inside by a double gelatinous membrane. The gel around the water is created from brown algae and calcium chloride.

MORE: Edible Water Bottle Could Save The Planet

As the Erie Railway grew, so did the amount of data it had to wrangle: which superintendents were responsible for which set of tracks; schedule changes; who the various conductors, laborers and brakemen worked under. 

As Caitlin Rosenthal writes over at McKinsey Quarterly, if any one data point was mismanaged it could bring dire results: “One delayed train, for example, could disrupt the progress of many others. And the stakes were high: with engines pulling cars in both directions along a single set of rails, schedule changes risked the deadly crashes that plagued 19th-century railroads.” 

The First Org Chart Ever Made Is a Masterpiece of Data Design | Wired.com

As the Erie Railway grew, so did the amount of data it had to wrangle: which superintendents were responsible for which set of tracks; schedule changes; who the various conductors, laborers and brakemen worked under.

As Caitlin Rosenthal writes over at McKinsey Quarterly, if any one data point was mismanaged it could bring dire results: “One delayed train, for example, could disrupt the progress of many others. And the stakes were high: with engines pulling cars in both directions along a single set of rails, schedule changes risked the deadly crashes that plagued 19th-century railroads.”

The First Org Chart Ever Made Is a Masterpiece of Data Design | Wired.com

lainnafader:

Awesome photo with this Newsweek story on a new, self-cleaning tape inspired by gecko feet. 

A single toe stuck to a wall is all a gecko needs to support its entire body weight. These tiny lizards have evolved microscopic hairs on their feet that exploit intermolecular forces to help them defy gravity on all kinds of surfaces: smooth or rough, dry or wet, clean or dirty. That’s why the gecko is the muse for science’s next generation of adhesives, and one such technology could be coming soon to a hardware store near you. A new gecko-inspired tape developed by a team of engineers at Carnegie Mellon University is super strong, cheap, and cleans itself with multiple uses, easily shedding dirt particles that limit the reusability of conventional adhesives, like those used in Post-It notes

lainnafader:

Awesome photo with this Newsweek story on a new, self-cleaning tape inspired by gecko feet.

A single toe stuck to a wall is all a gecko needs to support its entire body weight. These tiny lizards have evolved microscopic hairs on their feet that exploit intermolecular forces to help them defy gravity on all kinds of surfaces: smooth or rough, dry or wet, clean or dirty. That’s why the gecko is the muse for science’s next generation of adhesives, and one such technology could be coming soon to a hardware store near you. A new gecko-inspired tape developed by a team of engineers at Carnegie Mellon University is super strong, cheap, and cleans itself with multiple uses, easily shedding dirt particles that limit the reusability of conventional adhesives, like those used in Post-It notes

STORYTELLING THROUGH AUGMENTED REALITY The third variation on this has to do with the strange, abstract, isolated feeling people have while they’re up in the air. 

The air is awkward—you’re physically constrained in the plane and there’s a disconnected feeling. What’s ironic is that people are often mentally hibernating during a flight, but it’s pretty extraordinary. You’re several miles above Earth, and underneath there’s interesting stuff. So how can we provide a tool to show the geography? 

What are the stories below? What’s happening there now? Those little progress maps in the in-flight entertainment system are essentially glorified progress bars. It just tells us how long we have until it ends. But there’s an opportunity to get to another layer of data. 

We could provide the passenger with the experience of what’s happening on the ground and feed their curiosity. (via Outlandish Ideas To Improve Air Travel, From The Designers Of Beats By Dre)

STORYTELLING THROUGH AUGMENTED REALITY The third variation on this has to do with the strange, abstract, isolated feeling people have while they’re up in the air.

The air is awkward—you’re physically constrained in the plane and there’s a disconnected feeling. What’s ironic is that people are often mentally hibernating during a flight, but it’s pretty extraordinary. You’re several miles above Earth, and underneath there’s interesting stuff. So how can we provide a tool to show the geography?

What are the stories below? What’s happening there now? Those little progress maps in the in-flight entertainment system are essentially glorified progress bars. It just tells us how long we have until it ends. But there’s an opportunity to get to another layer of data.

We could provide the passenger with the experience of what’s happening on the ground and feed their curiosity. (via Outlandish Ideas To Improve Air Travel, From The Designers Of Beats By Dre)

newsbeastlabs:

Last month we published a package of stories marking the fortieth anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision. It had a few moving parts but I’ll just go over some of them briefly here.
How it started
This summer you probably heard the story about the last abortion clinic in Mississippi that was threatened to close due to stricter state laws. Allison Yarrow, who sat across from me at the time, was covering the story and it got us thinking: the line “The Last Abortion Clinic in Mississippi” is attention grabbing, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. That is to say, what you really want to know is how far are people away from their nearest clinic, regardless of state boundaries. One state may have five clinics but if they’re all in the southwest corner of the state and you live in the northeast corner, and your adjoining states have multiple clinics but only at their borders farthest from you, then you’ll have a hard time getting to a clinic, even if you had many in your state. To see where this might be the case and where access to services was compounded by new restrictive provisions (over 150 nationally in the past two years) we made as close to a comprehensive database as possible of every abortion clinic. Our goal was to see what parts of the country were farthest from a clinic. From start to finish, this process took about six months. 

Curious about “the process”? Read on.

newsbeastlabs:

Last month we published a package of stories marking the fortieth anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision. It had a few moving parts but I’ll just go over some of them briefly here.

How it started

This summer you probably heard the story about the last abortion clinic in Mississippi that was threatened to close due to stricter state laws. Allison Yarrow, who sat across from me at the time, was covering the story and it got us thinking: the line “The Last Abortion Clinic in Mississippi” is attention grabbing, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. That is to say, what you really want to know is how far are people away from their nearest clinic, regardless of state boundaries. One state may have five clinics but if they’re all in the southwest corner of the state and you live in the northeast corner, and your adjoining states have multiple clinics but only at their borders farthest from you, then you’ll have a hard time getting to a clinic, even if you had many in your state. To see where this might be the case and where access to services was compounded by new restrictive provisions (over 150 nationally in the past two years) we made as close to a comprehensive database as possible of every abortion clinic. Our goal was to see what parts of the country were farthest from a clinic. From start to finish, this process took about six months. 

Curious about “the process”? Read on.