Posts tagged earthquake
Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche
For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.
In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.
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Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche
For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.
In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.
ZoomInfo
Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche
For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.
In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.
ZoomInfo
Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche
For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.
In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.
ZoomInfo
Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche
For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.
In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.
ZoomInfo

Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche

For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.

In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.

A full-blown nuclear meltdown would be devastating for pregnant women and their fetuses, which are particularly vulnerable to the lasting effects of radiation. Should the worst-case scenario become a reality, it could lead to a generation of children born with all manner of maladies, from congenital malformation to mental retardation.
Reliving History: Flashbacks from NEWSWEEK’s Jan. 30, 1995 cover.

"Once again, Japan is shaken to its core,” NEWSWEEK wrote in 1995. Friday’s devastating 8.9-magnitude earthquake again wreaked havoc on the island nation, while dark waves from a tsunami destroyed everything in their path. It was a chilling reminder of Japan’s vulnerability to natural disasters—and also of the country’s remarkable diligence in preparing for them. After a 7.2-magnitude quake hit Kobe in 1995, our cover story looked at Japan’s disaster recovery and relief efforts. “Japan has rebuilt before,” the magazine wrote, “and now it must again."
See more images from 1995 here.

Reliving History: Flashbacks from NEWSWEEK’s Jan. 30, 1995 cover.

"Once again, Japan is shaken to its core,” NEWSWEEK wrote in 1995. Friday’s devastating 8.9-magnitude earthquake again wreaked havoc on the island nation, while dark waves from a tsunami destroyed everything in their path. It was a chilling reminder of Japan’s vulnerability to natural disasters—and also of the country’s remarkable diligence in preparing for them. After a 7.2-magnitude quake hit Kobe in 1995, our cover story looked at Japan’s disaster recovery and relief efforts. “Japan has rebuilt before,” the magazine wrote, “and now it must again."

See more images from 1995 here.