Posts tagged election 2012
This election was more fun than 2008 because Sarah Palin was just a caricature. She was a slow-moving varmint. Mitt Romney, after a lifetime of wanting to be president, was like a thoroughbred dressage horse—and as an admirer of all things equestrian, I found him more enjoyable to lasso.
Rob Delaney is in this week’s Newsweek writing about—what else?—the campaign!
Women voters proved that politicians cannot threaten their rights with impunity. We don’t yet know the precise influence that issues like equal-pay legislation, abortion, and birth control had on the electorate. Women are more liberal than men on a whole range of issues, including the strength of the safety net, and would likely have broken for Obama even if reproductive rights had played less of a role in the race.
Michelle Goldberg writes that the influence women exercised on this year’s results goes beyond electing female representation
Republicans, you have a problem:

In Iowa, the 2008 gender gap was 5 points. This year it was 15. Ohio swung from a 2-point gender gap in 2008 to 10 points in 2012. Virginia saw a 5-point swing, from 2 points in ’08 to 7 this year. Florida went from a 1-point gender gap to a 7-point gap in 2012. The only swing state that didn’t see a significant gender gap this time around was Colorado.
The media treated the “War on Women” as being primarily about reproductive issues, but not so the Obama campaign. Team Obama knew that the issue that women cared about the most was the economy, and reminded women constantly that the hostility the GOP shows toward the government could leave single women in a perilous situation. Republicans ridiculed “The Life of Julia,” but it was a brilliant campaign outreach tactic that showed how a Romney administration would affect women in a way that left nothing to the imagination.
Adding to the alienation of women voters this year were deeply troubling comments from GOP Senate candidates about rape, a tirade by Rush Limbaugh calling a woman a slut for testifying about the availability of birth control, and so on. Yes, Bill Maher is a pig and says terrible things about women too, but voters don’t view him as a leader in the Democratic Party in the same way Limbaugh is viewed in the GOP.  Also unhelpful to the GOP cause is the constant insistence that there is no wage discrimination against women—a stance that led to the mocking of the Lily Ledbetter Act, a milquetoast measure protecting women from salary discrimination that any decent person should support.

Republicans, you have a problem:

In Iowa, the 2008 gender gap was 5 points. This year it was 15. Ohio swung from a 2-point gender gap in 2008 to 10 points in 2012. Virginia saw a 5-point swing, from 2 points in ’08 to 7 this year. Florida went from a 1-point gender gap to a 7-point gap in 2012. The only swing state that didn’t see a significant gender gap this time around was Colorado.

The media treated the “War on Women” as being primarily about reproductive issues, but not so the Obama campaign. Team Obama knew that the issue that women cared about the most was the economy, and reminded women constantly that the hostility the GOP shows toward the government could leave single women in a perilous situation. Republicans ridiculed “The Life of Julia,” but it was a brilliant campaign outreach tactic that showed how a Romney administration would affect women in a way that left nothing to the imagination.

Adding to the alienation of women voters this year were deeply troubling comments from GOP Senate candidates about rape, a tirade by Rush Limbaugh calling a woman a slut for testifying about the availability of birth control, and so on. Yes, Bill Maher is a pig and says terrible things about women too, but voters don’t view him as a leader in the Democratic Party in the same way Limbaugh is viewed in the GOP.  Also unhelpful to the GOP cause is the constant insistence that there is no wage discrimination against women—a stance that led to the mocking of the Lily Ledbetter Act, a milquetoast measure protecting women from salary discrimination that any decent person should support.

The post-election issue of Newsweek hits newsstands and tablets (iPad, Kindle, Nook) tomorrow morning. On it, a very Napoleonic-looking Barack Obama stands triumphantly with sabre under the cover line, “The Obama Conquest.”
“Give me generals who know something about tactics and strategy,” Napoleon Bonaparte once said, “but best of all give me generals who are lucky.”
So the question: Is Obama a lucky general—or master of the game? Daniel Klaidman’s cover story, Fortunate One, says sure, Obama’s lucky. But he also relentlessly seizes his chances and makes every one of them count.
[Update! Switched “Napoleonic” from “Napoleonistic,” grammar h/t gifthorsedentistry]

The post-election issue of Newsweek hits newsstands and tablets (iPad, Kindle, Nook) tomorrow morning. On it, a very Napoleonic-looking Barack Obama stands triumphantly with sabre under the cover line, “The Obama Conquest.”

“Give me generals who know something about tactics and strategy,” Napoleon Bonaparte once said, “but best of all give me generals who are lucky.”

So the question: Is Obama a lucky general—or master of the game? Daniel Klaidman’s cover story, Fortunate One, says sure, Obama’s lucky. But he also relentlessly seizes his chances and makes every one of them count.

[Update! Switched “Napoleonic” from “Napoleonistic,” grammar h/t gifthorsedentistry]

Javelin, Jockey details, all posts, discontinue.
A little after Mitt Romney gave his concession speech late Tuesday night, and after he and Ann were safely tucked into bed, the Secret Service said goodnight to the former presidential candidate with these six words

A Dispatch From Mitt Romney’s Loser Party in Loserville

This comes from our political reporter, David Freedlander, poor guy, who last night had to go party at the saddest place in Boston. Let’s join him just as Michigan, then Minnesota, then Wisconsin begin to fall for Obama:

Down on the floor, eyes started to water and redden. The boisterousness that had fueled the party a few hours earlier fell to a whisper. It got harder to find a supporter not holding a beer or a glass of red wine, and then impossible, when campaign aides started to keep reporters off the floor.

The debate, about whether or not there was any kind of path for Romney, and what the party should do next—move to the center or keep veering to the right—was playing both on the screens and on the floor. “They will have to modernize,” said John Legittino, who had come to Boston from Chicago. “On abortion, health care. The Republican Party will have to come into the 21st century.”

More states fell. Iowa. Colorado. Then Ohio. Save for the dour voice of Brit Hume, broadcast over the worst party you have ever been to, it became eerily silent in Boston.

A junior aide came by the press table to wonder why the hacks weren’t typing any more. “We are waiting to see the results,” one said. It was a joke. The writing was on the wall, the carpets, the lights, the screens.

Mitt Romney’s Victory Party