Posts tagged fashion
In 2009, Forbes rated designer Yves Saint Laurent the “Top-Earning Dead Celebrity” of the year. (Surely a bittersweet distinction.) Now, Saint Laurent’s success — and how it was shaped and fed by his lover and manager Pierre Berge — is the subject of the new film Yves Saint Laurent. In it, their relationship is both interactive and supportive. 

"Fashion is not a major art," Saint Laurent says in the film, to which Berge replies, "The way you do it, you have to be an artist." 

The Turbulent Love Story Behind Yves Saint Laurent’s Revolutionary Rise : NPR

In 2009, Forbes rated designer Yves Saint Laurent the “Top-Earning Dead Celebrity” of the year. (Surely a bittersweet distinction.) Now, Saint Laurent’s success — and how it was shaped and fed by his lover and manager Pierre Berge — is the subject of the new film Yves Saint Laurent. In it, their relationship is both interactive and supportive.

"Fashion is not a major art," Saint Laurent says in the film, to which Berge replies, "The way you do it, you have to be an artist."

The Turbulent Love Story Behind Yves Saint Laurent’s Revolutionary Rise : NPR

picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo

picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.

In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”

Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.

The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.

The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.

“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”

blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC:  Two images care of the punk couture show that previewed today at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York – and that I just panned on TheDailyBeast.com. In that cranky review, however, I didn’t have room to mention that, among the talentless couturier copycats of punk who dominate the show, there are also a few designers, such as Rei Kawakubo  and Martin Margiela, who are genuine artistic geniuses. The thing is, I think that by including them the curators are guilty of that heinous sin that art historians call pseudomorphism: Imagining that because two artworks look the same, they also mean the same thing and play the same role in our culture. When  Sex Pistols drummer Paul Cook wore a Union Jack t-shirt in the late 1970s (left) his brash punk gesture meant something utterly different than when Rei Kawakubo, a Japanese intellectual, reworked the British flag (right) into runway fashion in 2006. Ditto for punk’s rebellious repurposing of junk and the Maison Martin Margiela’s thoughtful recycling of consumer goods in the fabulous Artisanal line it launched a few years ago. (Left, courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, © Dennis Morris; right, courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, photo by Catwalking)
For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive. The Daily Pic can also be found at the bottom of the home page of thedailybeast.com, and on that site’s Art Beast page.

blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC:  Two images care of the punk couture show that previewed today at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York – and that I just panned on TheDailyBeast.com. In that cranky review, however, I didn’t have room to mention that, among the talentless couturier copycats of punk who dominate the show, there are also a few designers, such as Rei Kawakubo  and Martin Margiela, who are genuine artistic geniuses. The thing is, I think that by including them the curators are guilty of that heinous sin that art historians call pseudomorphism: Imagining that because two artworks look the same, they also mean the same thing and play the same role in our culture. When  Sex Pistols drummer Paul Cook wore a Union Jack t-shirt in the late 1970s (left) his brash punk gesture meant something utterly different than when Rei Kawakubo, a Japanese intellectual, reworked the British flag (right) into runway fashion in 2006. Ditto for punk’s rebellious repurposing of junk and the Maison Martin Margiela’s thoughtful recycling of consumer goods in the fabulous Artisanal line it launched a few years ago. (Left, courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, © Dennis Morris; right, courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, photo by Catwalking)


For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive. The Daily Pic can also be found at the bottom of the home page of thedailybeast.com, and on that site’s Art Beast page.

Chaos to couture.
Design by Hussein Chalayan featured in the spring-summer 2003 issue of Dazed and Confused magazine.
Photo by Eric Nehr.

Chaos to couture.

Design by Hussein Chalayan featured in the spring-summer 2003 issue of Dazed and Confused magazine.

Photo by Eric Nehr.