Posts tagged gender
When Women Refuse is a Tumblr collecting stories of violence inflicted on women who reject sexual advances. The Tumblr came to be over the weekend following the UCSB shootings carried out by Elliot Rodger, and the #YesAllWomen conversation it triggered, first on social media. 
[visualization: Tweets with ‘#yesallwomen’ by Twitter’s Simon Rogers. When Women Refuse was created by Deanna Zandt, and is curated by many, including our own social media editor Lainna Fader]

When Women Refuse is a Tumblr collecting stories of violence inflicted on women who reject sexual advances. 

The Tumblr came to be over the weekend following the UCSB shootings carried out by Elliot Rodger, and the #YesAllWomen conversation it triggered, first on social media. 

[visualization: Tweets with ‘#yesallwomen’ by Twitter’s Simon Rogers. When Women Refuse was created by Deanna Zandt, and is curated by many, including our own social media editor Lainna Fader]

scienceisbeauty:

This might be tagged as ASFW (“Almost Safe For Work”): 

For the first time, a massive data set of 10,000 porn stars has been extracted from the world’s largest database of adult films and performers. I’ve spent the last six months analyzing it to discover the truth about what the average performer looks like, what they do on film, and how their role has evolved over the last forty years.

Source: Deep Inside - A Study of 10,000 Porn Stars (Jon Millward)
High res - full infographic

scienceisbeauty:

This might be tagged as ASFW (“Almost Safe For Work”): 

For the first time, a massive data set of 10,000 porn stars has been extracted from the world’s largest database of adult films and performers. I’ve spent the last six months analyzing it to discover the truth about what the average performer looks like, what they do on film, and how their role has evolved over the last forty years.

Source: Deep Inside - A Study of 10,000 Porn Stars (Jon Millward)

High res - full infographic

picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo
picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.
In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”
Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.
The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.
The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.
“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”
ZoomInfo

picturedept:

In today’s age of manscaping, stay at home dads and Dove skin care for Men; the male of this generation looks a lot different from the counterparts in their parent’s and grandparent’s day.

In trying to understand this redefining of what it means to be Male in the new millennium, Barcelona-based photographer Jon Uriarte came up with "The Men Under the Influence… ," a series of portraits that prode at "the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships (and) men’s sense of loss reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.”

Over a span of three years Uriarte, 33, photographed couples in the US and Spain, at first together, but then he hit on the idea it was better to isolate the men, as much physically as emotionally to bring him closer to the questions Uriarte imaged men were seeking.

The men were asked to dress in his girlfriend or wife’s clothing and captured in intimate spaces within their shared dwellings, a means to make visual what is only in the mind. One man stands in a mini-dress and tights in an office; another poses in a kitchen in a sundress and sandals. A third sits in a bedroom in jean shorts and a cardigan.

The portraits are quiet, almost devoid of emotion. These men aren’t wearing over-the-top costumes but everyday outfits that look entirely unique on the male body. Uriarte explains that to set up each shot, he went to a friend’s house and together they chose an outfit—often with the help of their partner.

“The rule was to choose an outfit that she would actually wear,” he tells The Daily Beast. “At the beginning they always chose the craziest clothes, and it became a joke. But it’s not a joke.”

Three years after the track’s release, Robyn puts out awesome gender-bending video for “U Can Do Better” feat Snoop Dogg (er, are we supposed to be calling him Lion now?!), with Snoop portrayed by a woman and the Swedish pop star’s signature moves performed by a boy.

[h/t pretty much amazing]

Hey, Ladies! Check out the Crucial Benefits of Obamacare.

Yesterday’s ruling on the Affordable Care Act was a “supreme win for women,” as our story by Jessica Arons, the director of the Women’s Health and Rights Program at the Center for American Progress, helpfully explains.

Here’s the deal:

  • As of 2014, “gender rating”—where insurers can charge women higher premiums than men—becomes illegal in all new individual and small group plans.
  • Currently only 12 percent of plans sold in the individual market offer maternity coverage. Once the Affordable Care Act is fully implemented, about 8.7 million women will have guaranteed access to maternity and newborn care in all new individual and small group plans.
  • It’s common in today’s market for insurers to refuse to cover women because of gender-based “preexisting conditions.” These conditions can include issues such as having had breast cancer or a Caesarean section or having been a victim of domestic violence or sexual assault. This practice, too, will be outlawed under Obamacare in 2014.
  • Under Obamacare, insurers are now required to cover critical preventive services such as mammograms, Pap smears, and well-baby care without cost sharing.
  • In addition, starting this August, more services specifically for women will be added to the list of preventive care that must be covered at no additional cost. That list includes contraception, gestational diabetes screening, breastfeeding counseling and equipment, annual well-woman care (in other words, a visit to the OB-GYN), and screening and counseling for domestic violence and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV and the human papillomavirus.
  • Other benefits for women include the ability to see their OB-GYN without a referral, guaranteed breaks and a private space for nursing moms to pump breast milk while at work, and home visiting programs for at-risk new mothers.

Pretty wild, right?  There’s more.

[Edit: If you’re reading this out of the dashboard, it looks weird. Sorry!]

joshsternberg:

msfranceswithane:

flavorpill:

Because that’s what we really need: more advertising beating you over the head with antiquated gender roles. Thx, Dr. Pepper!

Just when you think advertisers couldn’t possibly be any more tone deaf.

You’d think CEOs (or at least advertising/marketing people) would be paying attention to all mistakes other companies make. 

It’s like the ‘boys only’ tree house for the soda industry. Root beer for life, y’all.

joshsternberg:

msfranceswithane:

flavorpill:

Because that’s what we really need: more advertising beating you over the head with antiquated gender roles. Thx, Dr. Pepper!

Just when you think advertisers couldn’t possibly be any more tone deaf.

You’d think CEOs (or at least advertising/marketing people) would be paying attention to all mistakes other companies make. 

It’s like the ‘boys only’ tree house for the soda industry. Root beer for life, y’all.

(via joshsternberg)

It used to be that you couldn’t attack a female candidate without helping her … [But] the power of gender as a deterrent to political attack (and off-the-cuff remarks) is being tested, so far to no advantage, in this election cycle as California gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman tries to rally women voters after the word “whore” was applied to her by the camp of her rival, democratic gubernatorial candidate Jerry Brown.
Our own Eleanor Clift, on Hillary Clinton, Meg Whitman and the “whore” slur