Posts tagged girl power
Today in Newsweek archives: Girls Rule!
Yesterday’s dramatic penalty shootout win over Brazil in the semifinals of the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup marked the 12th anniversary of this iconic 1999 image, showing defender Brandi Chastain (now an ESPN commentator) just seconds after she secured the penalty for the World Cup win against China (the second win in U.S. history). At the time, international interest in women’s soccer was at an all-time high—and the celebrated match against China was the most-attended women’s sporting event in history. Chastain called it “the greatest moment of my life on the soccer field. The U.S. is set to face France on Wednesday.

Today in Newsweek archives: Girls Rule!

Yesterday’s dramatic penalty shootout win over Brazil in the semifinals of the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup marked the 12th anniversary of this iconic 1999 image, showing defender Brandi Chastain (now an ESPN commentator) just seconds after she secured the penalty for the World Cup win against China (the second win in U.S. history). At the time, international interest in women’s soccer was at an all-time high—and the celebrated match against China was the most-attended women’s sporting event in history. Chastain called it “the greatest moment of my life on the soccer field. The U.S. is set to face France on Wednesday.

The most powerful woman in American politics has kept her head down for most of the first 18 months of her tenure as secretary of State. But she is also, at present, by far the most unscathed senior member of a badly battered administration. And the once-defeated Democratic candidate may have, at present, the most promising political prospects of just about everyone in the administration, including Barack Obama.
Michael Hirsh, on Hillary Clinton’s rising political star.
Dahlia Lithwick says yes.

Social scientists contend that the difference is more than just cosmetic. They cite a 2006 study by the Wellesley Centers for Women that found three to be the magic number when it came to the impact of women on corporate boards: after the third woman is seated, boards reach a tipping point at which the group as a whole begins to function differently. According to Sumru Erkut, one of the authors of that study, the small group as a whole becomes more collaborative, and more open to different perspectives. In no small part, she writes, that’s because once a critical mass of three women is achieved on a board, it’s more likely that all the women will be heard.

Dahlia Lithwick says yes.

Social scientists contend that the difference is more than just cosmetic. They cite a 2006 study by the Wellesley Centers for Women that found three to be the magic number when it came to the impact of women on corporate boards: after the third woman is seated, boards reach a tipping point at which the group as a whole begins to function differently. According to Sumru Erkut, one of the authors of that study, the small group as a whole becomes more collaborative, and more open to different perspectives. In no small part, she writes, that’s because once a critical mass of three women is achieved on a board, it’s more likely that all the women will be heard.