Posts tagged illustration
From weeping warts to leprosy: the gruesome art of medical illustration

This tension, between the functionalism of medical illustration and the aesthetic properties of the images themselves, is as present for the modern viewer as it was for Hazlitt – with this added humanitarian twist: whereas from the 1700s well into the 19th century, the bodies of those so dissected and displayed were accorded no particular respect, our culture of sympathy cannot help but imbue even the most hacked-about and diseased of tissues with the lineaments of sensibility.

"The strange, symbiotic relationship between medicine and social oppression is here given full-colour form: not only by anatomical illustrations of paupers’ and criminals’ corpses, but also by what – were they not so disfigured – would be regarded as straightforward portraits of the leprous and the syphilitic, the tubercular and the cancerous."

From weeping warts to leprosy: the gruesome art of medical illustration

This tension, between the functionalism of medical illustration and the aesthetic properties of the images themselves, is as present for the modern viewer as it was for Hazlitt – with this added humanitarian twist: whereas from the 1700s well into the 19th century, the bodies of those so dissected and displayed were accorded no particular respect, our culture of sympathy cannot help but imbue even the most hacked-about and diseased of tissues with the lineaments of sensibility.

"The strange, symbiotic relationship between medicine and social oppression is here given full-colour form: not only by anatomical illustrations of paupers’ and criminals’ corpses, but also by what – were they not so disfigured – would be regarded as straightforward portraits of the leprous and the syphilitic, the tubercular and the cancerous."

On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo

On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.

Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.

A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.

mckibillo:

Quick commission for @Newsweek, well the iPad edition actually. Happy that they are commissioning original artwork! Thanks guys.
BTW, how DOES one best showcase an illustration done for the iPad? Because screen grabs seem pretty suboptimal.

Can’t answer that question, but what we WILL do is reblog it! Nice job. 
ZoomInfo
mckibillo:

Quick commission for @Newsweek, well the iPad edition actually. Happy that they are commissioning original artwork! Thanks guys.
BTW, how DOES one best showcase an illustration done for the iPad? Because screen grabs seem pretty suboptimal.

Can’t answer that question, but what we WILL do is reblog it! Nice job. 
ZoomInfo
mckibillo:

Quick commission for @Newsweek, well the iPad edition actually. Happy that they are commissioning original artwork! Thanks guys.
BTW, how DOES one best showcase an illustration done for the iPad? Because screen grabs seem pretty suboptimal.

Can’t answer that question, but what we WILL do is reblog it! Nice job. 
ZoomInfo

mckibillo:

Quick commission for @Newsweek, well the iPad edition actually. Happy that they are commissioning original artwork! Thanks guys.

BTW, how DOES one best showcase an illustration done for the iPad? Because screen grabs seem pretty suboptimal.

Can’t answer that question, but what we WILL do is reblog it! Nice job. 

This is an illustration of, we believe, a fighter jet, pirate ship, and naked backside of a woman drawn by this morning’s shooter at the Empire State Building. How he describes it:

Wading into Sarasota Bay she was anticipating a relaxing moonlight swim out to the Pirate ship. Hurtling into the periphery of her vision in a blur of fiery motion, a Phantom screamed overhead into the nightscape. It was so low she had seen the reflection of it’s burners on the ocean’s surface. She’d been startled and forgot to dive in…they’ll have lot’s to talk about tomorrow!

Weird.
Update 1:29pm ET: We went down this rabbit hole after this tweet by the New York Times sent us to one of his alleged websites. From there, we ran a domain search and saw other domains he owned. The above image came from one of those websites.

This is an illustration of, we believe, a fighter jet, pirate ship, and naked backside of a woman drawn by this morning’s shooter at the Empire State Building. How he describes it:

Wading into Sarasota Bay she was anticipating a relaxing moonlight swim out to the Pirate ship. Hurtling into the periphery of her vision in a blur of fiery motion, a Phantom screamed overhead into the nightscape. It was so low she had seen the reflection of it’s burners on the ocean’s surface. She’d been startled and forgot to dive in…they’ll have lot’s to talk about tomorrow!

Weird.

Update 1:29pm ET: We went down this rabbit hole after this tweet by the New York Times sent us to one of his alleged websites. From there, we ran a domain search and saw other domains he owned. The above image came from one of those websites.

blakegopnik:

Daily Pic: This Picasso drawing, called “Two Figures on a Beach,” is from 1933 – but looks like it could have been made yesterday. (Like Friday’s Daily Pic by Bruce Nauman, it’s from the “Exquisite Corpses” show at MoMA.) The drawing has the doodle-ish, ball-point-pen surrealism that is everywhere lately. You want to resist Picasso, just because of all his success. And then he pulls out a new trick that wins you over. Even a genius  as protean as Nauman can start to look one-note compared to old Pablo. (© 2012 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Ahead of your time, Picasso.

blakegopnik:

Daily Pic: This Picasso drawing, called “Two Figures on a Beach,” is from 1933 – but looks like it could have been made yesterday. (Like Friday’s Daily Pic by Bruce Nauman, it’s from the “Exquisite Corpses” show at MoMA.) The drawing has the doodle-ish, ball-point-pen surrealism that is everywhere lately. You want to resist Picasso, just because of all his success. And then he pulls out a new trick that wins you over. Even a genius  as protean as Nauman can start to look one-note compared to old Pablo. (© 2012 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Ahead of your time, Picasso.

Illustrator Jim Stoten drew up ‘Beatles Land’ for our special Beatles issue. It’s like a Where’s Waldo for fans of the Fab Four. WE LOVE IT. How many Beatles songs can you find? By our count, there are 34—from “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” to “Dig A Pony.” [View high-res, where you can also see the answers on the right-hand side.]
[ed: This is even more awesome in the commemorative iPad issue, that’s available in the iPad Newsstand, its natural habitat, which is all clicky and digital and full of audio bits of the songs.]

Illustrator Jim Stoten drew up ‘Beatles Land’ for our special Beatles issue. It’s like a Where’s Waldo for fans of the Fab Four. WE LOVE IT. How many Beatles songs can you find? By our count, there are 34—from “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” to “Dig A Pony.” [View high-res, where you can also see the answers on the right-hand side.]

[ed: This is even more awesome in the commemorative iPad issue, that’s available in the iPad Newsstand, its natural habitat, which is all clicky and digital and full of audio bits of the songs.]