Posts tagged japan
About 60 miles from the site of the deadly 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima prefecture, inside a former silicon chip manufacturing facility owned by the Japanese computer company Fujitsu, a small team of highly trained engineers are working on one of the company’s hottest new products. 

Fujitsu’s marketing team claims it’s already proving a hit with their oldest—and youngest—consumers. It’s so popular, in fact, it’s probably just the first in a long line of related Fujitsu products. The product is lettuce. Like the giant monolith in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001, this new head of lettuce is simultaneously a product of this factory’s past and the future. 

Fujitsu is a space-age R&D innovator with sprawling, specialized factories. But several of its facilities, including this one, went dark when the company tightened its belt and reorganized its product lines after the 2008 global financial crisis. Now in the aftermath, it has retrofitted this facilities to serve tomorrow’s vegetable consumers, who will pay for a better-than-organic product, and who enjoy a bowl of iceberg more if they know it was monitored by thousands of little sensors. 

The Internet Of Things Meets Hydroponics: How To Grow A Better Vegetable

About 60 miles from the site of the deadly 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima prefecture, inside a former silicon chip manufacturing facility owned by the Japanese computer company Fujitsu, a small team of highly trained engineers are working on one of the company’s hottest new products.

Fujitsu’s marketing team claims it’s already proving a hit with their oldest—and youngest—consumers. It’s so popular, in fact, it’s probably just the first in a long line of related Fujitsu products. The product is lettuce. Like the giant monolith in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001, this new head of lettuce is simultaneously a product of this factory’s past and the future.

Fujitsu is a space-age R&D innovator with sprawling, specialized factories. But several of its facilities, including this one, went dark when the company tightened its belt and reorganized its product lines after the 2008 global financial crisis. Now in the aftermath, it has retrofitted this facilities to serve tomorrow’s vegetable consumers, who will pay for a better-than-organic product, and who enjoy a bowl of iceberg more if they know it was monitored by thousands of little sensors.

The Internet Of Things Meets Hydroponics: How To Grow A Better Vegetable

Newsweek photo essays won top honors in American Photography, National Press Photographer’s Association (NPPA), Best of Photojournalism and Pictures of the Year International! 
American Photography Awards —Published online and to be included in AP30 Photo Annual.
Giovanni Cocco: Toiling in Tunisia 
Arko Datto: Dreaming In Color On India’s Streets 
Kevin Frayer: Instagramming Typhoon Haiyan
Andrea Frazzetta: Gaming Alone In Tokyo 
Noriko Hayashi: Grab and Run: Kyrgyzstan’s Bride Kidnappings 
Vivana Peretti: Colombia’s Next Drag Superstar
NPPA Best of Photojournalism Award — 1st Place Contemporary Issues
Noriko Hayashi: Grab and Run: Kyrgyzstan’s Bride Kidnappings 
Pictures of the Year International Award of Excellence 
Arko Datto: Dreaming In Color On India’s Streets

Newsweek photo essays won top honors in American Photography, National Press Photographer’s Association (NPPA), Best of Photojournalism and Pictures of the Year International! 

American Photography Awards —Published online and to be included in AP30 Photo Annual.

Giovanni Cocco: Toiling in Tunisia

Arko Datto: Dreaming In Color On India’s Streets 

Kevin Frayer: Instagramming Typhoon Haiyan

Andrea Frazzetta: Gaming Alone In Tokyo 

Noriko Hayashi: Grab and Run: Kyrgyzstan’s Bride Kidnappings 

Vivana Peretti: Colombia’s Next Drag Superstar

NPPA Best of Photojournalism Award — 1st Place Contemporary Issues

Noriko Hayashi: Grab and Run: Kyrgyzstan’s Bride Kidnappings 

Pictures of the Year International Award of Excellence

Arko Datto: Dreaming In Color On India’s Streets

Dr. Haruko Obokata, a rising star of the scientific community and lead author on two papers heralded as revolutionizing to the field of stem cell research, has been found guilty of scientific misconduct by Japan’s leading research institute. 
The accusation is the latest problem for the studies, which claimed to be able to produce stem cells from ordinary cells in simple laboratory procedures: bathing regular cells in an acid, or applying mechanical stressors like “squeezing.” The research, known as stimulus triggered activation of pluripotency (STAP), was published in Nature in January, and recently ran into questions of methodology.
On Tuesday morning, the research institute RIKEN announced that Obokata, 30, had deliberately fabricated the data to produce the findings. Institute director Ryoji Noyori said he planned to “rigorously punish relevant people after procedures in a disciplinary committee,” according to AFP. Shunsuke Ishii, chairman of the investigative committee on the issue, told reporters that “Obokata alone is responsible for the misconduct.”

Dr. Haruko Obokata, a rising star of the scientific community and lead author on two papers heralded as revolutionizing to the field of stem cell research, has been found guilty of scientific misconduct by Japan’s leading research institute. 

The accusation is the latest problem for the studies, which claimed to be able to produce stem cells from ordinary cells in simple laboratory procedures: bathing regular cells in an acid, or applying mechanical stressors like “squeezing.” The research, known as stimulus triggered activation of pluripotency (STAP), was published in Nature in January, and recently ran into questions of methodology.

On Tuesday morning, the research institute RIKEN announced that Obokata, 30, had deliberately fabricated the data to produce the findings. Institute director Ryoji Noyori said he planned to “rigorously punish relevant people after procedures in a disciplinary committee,” according to AFP. Shunsuke Ishii, chairman of the investigative committee on the issue, told reporters that “Obokata alone is responsible for the misconduct.”

Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche
For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.
In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.
ZoomInfo
Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche
For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.
In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.
ZoomInfo
Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche
For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.
In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.
ZoomInfo
Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche
For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.
In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.
ZoomInfo
Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche
For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.
In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.
ZoomInfo

Photo Essay: Tokyo Trains for the Next One by Nicolas Datiche

For Japanese, the disaster of the Tohoku great earthquake is a nightmare that never goes away. Three years ago the 9.0 magnitude quake struck the Sendai region on March 11, 2011.

In Tokyo, the word “Jishin,” meaning earthquake, is a big part of daily life and culture. Signboards on the streets indicate the nearest emergency shelters and an earthquake forecast alert app, made by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), is on everyone’s smartphones. The people try to stay alert for the next big disaster.

Newsweek Japan's cover reads “Hopeless America: The Suicidal Superpower” #ouch

Newsweek Japan's cover reads “Hopeless America: The Suicidal Superpower” #ouch

The Lede has video recorded from the dashboard of a delivery driver’s car as the tsunami rushed through streets in Japan. This is fascinating POV footage, and it’s equally haunting as you can see how completely normal that day was for these people.

This came through our Twitter, and appears to be footage of a July 19th, 2011 meeting between residents of Fukushima Prefecture—which was heavily hit from the 3-punch combo of earthquake, tsunami, and resulting nuclear fall-out.

Residents are demanding “that the government evacuate people promptly in Fukushima and provide financial and logistical support for them” to a government representative. At one point (2:50), the government representative is asked to test the urine of children—and that person refuses. Semi-chaos ensues (“Test this urine!”, “Do you not have children?” “Please don’t run away!”).