Posts tagged jobs
This week, military veterans finally received a better crack at getting jobs. High unemployment for veterans has been a perennial problem, for everyone from those who fought in the Gulf War to those who were recently in Afghanistan. 

The veterans’ unemployment rate has been dropping, but many are still frustrated as the Guardian explored in a recent package of stories about misunderstood veterans in the job hunt, job tips for them, and the financial snake-oil salesmen who lie in wait for them. 

There were 733,000 veterans without jobs in 2013, though the unemployment rate varied by state, “ranging from over 10% in Michigan and New Jersey to under 4% in Delaware, Iowa, North Dakota, Vermont and Virginia,” according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest measures, which were released in March. 

The government has been working on solutions. This week, the Labor Department put into effect new guidelines that required federal contractors – companies that do business with the government – to make veterans around 8% of their workforce and disabled workers around 7% of their employees. 

Those companies that do business with the government, known as federal contractors, include some of the biggest names in business, including Boeing, Dell, General Electric, AT&T, UPS and Pfizer among thousands of others.

 The Guardian’s package prompted a veteran to describe his extensive job hunt and the lessons he learned from it. Because he cannot speak publicly without endangering his current job, he asked to remain anonymous. We share his impressions here in the belief that they can help other veterans – and their families – understand civilian life and the job hunt. 

Job hunting for veterans: ‘My resume went into a black hole’ | theguardian.com

This week, military veterans finally received a better crack at getting jobs. High unemployment for veterans has been a perennial problem, for everyone from those who fought in the Gulf War to those who were recently in Afghanistan.

The veterans’ unemployment rate has been dropping, but many are still frustrated as the Guardian explored in a recent package of stories about misunderstood veterans in the job hunt, job tips for them, and the financial snake-oil salesmen who lie in wait for them.

There were 733,000 veterans without jobs in 2013, though the unemployment rate varied by state, “ranging from over 10% in Michigan and New Jersey to under 4% in Delaware, Iowa, North Dakota, Vermont and Virginia,” according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest measures, which were released in March.

The government has been working on solutions. This week, the Labor Department put into effect new guidelines that required federal contractors – companies that do business with the government – to make veterans around 8% of their workforce and disabled workers around 7% of their employees.

Those companies that do business with the government, known as federal contractors, include some of the biggest names in business, including Boeing, Dell, General Electric, AT&T, UPS and Pfizer among thousands of others.

The Guardian’s package prompted a veteran to describe his extensive job hunt and the lessons he learned from it. Because he cannot speak publicly without endangering his current job, he asked to remain anonymous. We share his impressions here in the belief that they can help other veterans – and their families – understand civilian life and the job hunt.

Job hunting for veterans: ‘My resume went into a black hole’ | theguardian.com

WASHINGTON — Staci Bivens knew something was seriously wrong when her bosses at Russia Today asked her to put together a story alleging that Germany — Europe’s economic powerhouse — was a failed state.

“It was me and two managers and they had already discussed what they wanted,” Bivens, an American who worked in RT’s Moscow headquarters from 2009 through 2011, said of a meeting she’d had to discuss the segment before a planned reporting trip to Germany. “They called me in and it was really surreal. One of the managers said, ‘The story is that the West is failing, Germany is a failed state.’”

Bivens, who had spent time in Germany, told the managers the story wasn’t true — the term “failed state” is reserved for countries that fail to provide basic government services, like Somalia or Congo, not for economically advanced, industrialized nations like Germany. They insisted. Bivens refused. RT flew a crew to Germany ahead of Bivens, who was flown in later to do a few standups and interviews about racism in Germany. It was the beginning of the end of her RT career.

“At that point I’d been there for a little bit and I’d had enough of the insanity,” Bivens said. She stayed until the end of her contract in 2011 and didn’t make an effort to renew it.

Judging by interviews with seven former and current employees, Bivens’ story is typical. RT, the global English-language news network funded by the Russian government, has come into the spotlight since the Russian invasion of Crimea, which the network has defended tooth-and-nail. The invasion has led to two high-profile rebellions within the ranks: first, an on-air condemnation of the invasion by RT America host Abby Martin, followed days later by the live resignation of another host, Liz Wahl. 

Martin, who hosts an opinion show, said that Russia’s actions were wrong; Wahl, a news anchor, went one step further, saying that she could not work at a network that found Russia’s actions acceptable. 

How The Truth Is Made At Russia Today

WASHINGTON — Staci Bivens knew something was seriously wrong when her bosses at Russia Today asked her to put together a story alleging that Germany — Europe’s economic powerhouse — was a failed state.

“It was me and two managers and they had already discussed what they wanted,” Bivens, an American who worked in RT’s Moscow headquarters from 2009 through 2011, said of a meeting she’d had to discuss the segment before a planned reporting trip to Germany. “They called me in and it was really surreal. One of the managers said, ‘The story is that the West is failing, Germany is a failed state.’”

Bivens, who had spent time in Germany, told the managers the story wasn’t true — the term “failed state” is reserved for countries that fail to provide basic government services, like Somalia or Congo, not for economically advanced, industrialized nations like Germany. They insisted. Bivens refused. RT flew a crew to Germany ahead of Bivens, who was flown in later to do a few standups and interviews about racism in Germany. It was the beginning of the end of her RT career.

“At that point I’d been there for a little bit and I’d had enough of the insanity,” Bivens said. She stayed until the end of her contract in 2011 and didn’t make an effort to renew it.

Judging by interviews with seven former and current employees, Bivens’ story is typical. RT, the global English-language news network funded by the Russian government, has come into the spotlight since the Russian invasion of Crimea, which the network has defended tooth-and-nail. The invasion has led to two high-profile rebellions within the ranks: first, an on-air condemnation of the invasion by RT America host Abby Martin, followed days later by the live resignation of another host, Liz Wahl.

Martin, who hosts an opinion show, said that Russia’s actions were wrong; Wahl, a news anchor, went one step further, saying that she could not work at a network that found Russia’s actions acceptable.

How The Truth Is Made At Russia Today

whitehouse:

Share the news: Our economy added 176,000 private-sector jobs last month, while unemployment dipped to its lowest rate since December 2008. http://at.wh.gov/kGdc9

whitehouse:

Share the news: Our economy added 176,000 private-sector jobs last month, while unemployment dipped to its lowest rate since December 2008. http://at.wh.gov/kGdc9

Tumblr Staff: A year ago, Tumblr did something unprecedented — we created an...http://staff.tumblr.com/post/47584806521/a-year-ago-tumblr-did-something-unprecedented

jessbennett:

staff:

A year ago, Tumblr did something unprecedented — we created an editorial team of experienced journalists and editors assigned to cover Tumblr as a living, breathing community. The team’s mandate was to tell the stories of Tumblr creators in a truly thoughtful way — focusing on the people, their…

RIP TUMBLR EDITORIAL. WE PRODUCED SOME AWESOME MOTHERFUCKING SHIT / REDEFINED JOURNALISM / WON SOME AWARDS / OBSESSED OVER ONE DIRECTION / ALL THAT. IT WAS A GREAT RIDE> NOW: ANYONE WANT TO HIRE ME?

ALSO: Drunk on a plane. The only way to go out (or down?! It’s really bumpy.) Sorry for the all caps! XO

Former nwktumblr lady Jess Bennett kicked some butt over at Tumblr’s Storyboard up until last night when the Karp Factory sent all the editorial staffers home—for good. Somebody, hire her!

"How Do I Get A Job In Journalism?"

This is a question we see come through the ol’ Ask box from time to time, and it’s never truly a very easy one to answer. Looking around the newsroom, our colleagues come from a wide array of backgrounds, and there’s not really a point A-to-point B path to become a journalist (other than, we suppose, going to J school, but even then who knows). 

David Carr’s doing a Reddit AMA right now and he just answered this question rather succinctly, so here you go:

The tools of journalism are in your hands and no one is going to give a damn about what is on your resume, they want to see what you have made with your own little fingies. Can you use Final Cut Pro? Have you created an Instagram that is about something besides a picture of your cat every time she rolls over? Is HTML 5 a foreign language to you? Is your social media presence dominated by a picture of your beer bong, or is it an RSS of interesting stuff that you add insight to? People who are doing hires will have great visibility into what you can actually do, what you care about and how you can express on any number of platforms.

via Reddit

I actually hate the stereotype that McDonald’s workers are stupid

stan93:

I’ve worked there for 3 years now.

I left school with GCSE’s of 1 A*, 8 A’s and 2 B’s.

I left college with A-levels of 1 A* and 2 B’s.

I’m currently at university taking English literature and aspiring to be a teacher.

I work there to pay my way, because the job is flexible and there are plenty of hours to go around, not because I’m stupid.

so just fuck off, kthnx.

Fist bump. Keep at it, stan93!

Forced to take lower wages if they can find work at all and facing still-expensive housing in those markets where many of the jobs are, roughly one in five American adults 25 to 34 now live with their parents—almost double the percentage from 30 years ago.
Are we a “screwed generation”? Maybe.

JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS JOBS

Dear tumblr,

We’re hiring for some great positions over here at Newsweek & The Daily Beast. Want to get into media? Want to work in the news biz? Want unlimited Smartfood popcorn? How about Animal Crackers?

Here’s your shot.

Let us know if you apply and we’ll flag it with HR as coming from our tumblr family!

1. Edit Producer: This is a part-time position on the edit side working with production to build our stories for the web and our iPad app. You’ll be fiddling with copy and making our content look beautiful. Ideal candidate, it sounds like, will have a little bit of publishing/media experience and a familiarity with InDesign. Apply here!

2. Sales Coordinator: Entry level job working on the sales side. Looks like a great opportunity for someone trying to get in the business side of the media world. Apply here!

We’ve also got a couple of internships available: one in fashion & the arts and the other working on the international edition. You can see those listings on our jobs “portal.” 

Good luck, y’all.

futurejournalismproject:

“The exact details of the buyout, technically a voluntary Separation Incentive Program, will come later.”

—Memo to Washington Post staff that the newspaper plans to lay off — err, offer a Separation Incentive Program to — 200 20 people. Via the New York Times.

Other names for the lay-offs, er, Separation Incentive Program that can be found on HR’s cutting room floor include the Relinquishment of Vocation & Reimbursement Registrants, the Migration Towards Reverse-Enrollment Bestowment Program, & the Abdication of Avocation and Atonement Deal. They picked the right one though.

Update: FJP corrects this to 20 positions.

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

Tumble with Muck Rack: we’re hiring writers

muckrack:

We’re planning to expand Muck Rack’s coverage of the intersection of journalism and social media on this Tumblr-powered site with short, pithy articles. Muck Rack’s content reaches thousands of journalists and media professionals through our Tumblr, Twitter and Muck Rack Daily subscribers.

The new member of our editorial team should have a background covering media, especially social media, for a news organization. Our ideal candidate has part-time availability and a well-followed Twitter and/or Tumblr account. Experience at a national outlet creating online content preferred. Be someone who’s smart, friendly, and hungry to make an impact.

If you’re interested, send a few links to articles you’ve written, your resume, and links to your social media profiles to muckgig@muckrack.com.

Today in Home News!
On his blog, which will soon be moving to Newsweek & The Daily Beast, here’s how David Frum announced the news to his readers: 

FrumForum launched itself almost exactly three years ago, on Inauguration Day 2009. Over the subsequent interval, our hundreds of contributors have reached more than 5 million individual readers. I like to think that together we have helped to move the national debate. When we launched, Sarah Palin was a leading candidate for president and Glenn Beck was broadcasting conspiracy theories on cable TV. Three years later–not so much. OK, maybe we can’t claim all the credit. But we won’t refuse some fair share.
Now like all good things, this adventure is coming to an end. I’ve been invited to move my blog and print journalism to the Daily Beast/Newsweek, a larger and more technologically advanced platform. Tina Brown is one of the great media visionaries of our time. The opportunity to work with her–and learn from her–is deeply exciting.
Starting Monday, my work will shift to the Daily Beast/Newsweek site. The FrumForum URL will forward readers to the David Frum page at Daily Beast/Newsweek. FrumForum itself will continue to exist as an archive site, preserving three years of debate–the brilliant insights of our writers–and the passionate comments of our readers. Noah Kristula-Green will join me on the Daily Beast/Newsweek team.
I sincerely thank all who participated and supported this project. The world is changed only very slowly. It’s a big rock, and as human beings we represent only very minuscule and fleeting drips of water. But change is made, and together I believe the change we have offered here has been for the good.
Above all, I thank every reader–those who dissented fully as much as those who read with agreement. Journalism in the digital age is a process rather than a product; an exchange rather than a presentation; intimate rather than abstract. That process continues as ardently as ever, but in a new and improved form and at a bigger and stronger venue.

We bolded the line about journalism, because that is just awesome and right on.

Today in Home News!

On his blog, which will soon be moving to Newsweek & The Daily Beast, here’s how David Frum announced the news to his readers

FrumForum launched itself almost exactly three years ago, on Inauguration Day 2009. Over the subsequent interval, our hundreds of contributors have reached more than 5 million individual readers. I like to think that together we have helped to move the national debate. When we launched, Sarah Palin was a leading candidate for president and Glenn Beck was broadcasting conspiracy theories on cable TV. Three years later–not so much. OK, maybe we can’t claim all the credit. But we won’t refuse some fair share.

Now like all good things, this adventure is coming to an end. I’ve been invited to move my blog and print journalism to the Daily Beast/Newsweek, a larger and more technologically advanced platform. Tina Brown is one of the great media visionaries of our time. The opportunity to work with her–and learn from her–is deeply exciting.

Starting Monday, my work will shift to the Daily Beast/Newsweek site. The FrumForum URL will forward readers to the David Frum page at Daily Beast/Newsweek. FrumForum itself will continue to exist as an archive site, preserving three years of debate–the brilliant insights of our writers–and the passionate comments of our readers. Noah Kristula-Green will join me on the Daily Beast/Newsweek team.

I sincerely thank all who participated and supported this project. The world is changed only very slowly. It’s a big rock, and as human beings we represent only very minuscule and fleeting drips of water. But change is made, and together I believe the change we have offered here has been for the good.

Above all, I thank every reader–those who dissented fully as much as those who read with agreement. Journalism in the digital age is a process rather than a product; an exchange rather than a presentation; intimate rather than abstract. That process continues as ardently as ever, but in a new and improved form and at a bigger and stronger venue.

We bolded the line about journalism, because that is just awesome and right on.

Here’s something we all knew but perhaps hoped wasn’t necessarily true: potential employers are up in your Facebooks, not-liking those sassy Halloween photos.

Here’s something we all knew but perhaps hoped wasn’t necessarily true: potential employers are up in your Facebooks, not-liking those sassy Halloween photos.