Posts tagged journalism
Protests are often remembered at their most iconic: A flower in a gun barrel opposing war in Vietnam, a “Black Power” salute at the 1968 Olympics, a Tank Man in Tiananmen Square. But though an image can define a protest, the reverse is often true—especially in an age of live coverage and social media, where the world is constantly watching.
Recent protests, like the “Occupy Central” protests in Hong Kong and the battle for racial justice in Ferguson, have yielded symbols breathtaking for their visual contrasts: Raised arms before military-grade vehicles, umbrellas dispelling thick streams of pepper spray fired at waves of protesters.
These moments are irresistible in an era where social networking can fuel protest, where hashtag activism can unite communities around the world, the universality of such symbols is tempting to highlight.
The question must be asked however: How much of their meaning is organic to those who protest, and how does it change after going through the filter of the media and public consumption?
Go deeper and get the story at Newsweek.com
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Protests are often remembered at their most iconic: A flower in a gun barrel opposing war in Vietnam, a “Black Power” salute at the 1968 Olympics, a Tank Man in Tiananmen Square. But though an image can define a protest, the reverse is often true—especially in an age of live coverage and social media, where the world is constantly watching.
Recent protests, like the “Occupy Central” protests in Hong Kong and the battle for racial justice in Ferguson, have yielded symbols breathtaking for their visual contrasts: Raised arms before military-grade vehicles, umbrellas dispelling thick streams of pepper spray fired at waves of protesters.
These moments are irresistible in an era where social networking can fuel protest, where hashtag activism can unite communities around the world, the universality of such symbols is tempting to highlight.
The question must be asked however: How much of their meaning is organic to those who protest, and how does it change after going through the filter of the media and public consumption?
Go deeper and get the story at Newsweek.com
ZoomInfo

Protests are often remembered at their most iconic: A flower in a gun barrel opposing war in Vietnam, a “Black Power” salute at the 1968 Olympics, a Tank Man in Tiananmen Square. But though an image can define a protest, the reverse is often true—especially in an age of live coverage and social media, where the world is constantly watching.

Recent protests, like the “Occupy Central” protests in Hong Kong and the battle for racial justice in Ferguson, have yielded symbols breathtaking for their visual contrasts: Raised arms before military-grade vehicles, umbrellas dispelling thick streams of pepper spray fired at waves of protesters.

These moments are irresistible in an era where social networking can fuel protest, where hashtag activism can unite communities around the world, the universality of such symbols is tempting to highlight.

The question must be asked however: How much of their meaning is organic to those who protest, and how does it change after going through the filter of the media and public consumption?

Go deeper and get the story at Newsweek.com

Waiting for Dark: Inside Two Anarchists’ Quest for Untraceable Money


Amir Taaki and Cody Wilson are cruising north through Texas on Interstate 35 in the 4:30 am predawn darkness. One of the headlights on the aging BMW Wilson’s driving is burned out, and he’s wearing sunglasses. “They’re prescription,” he says drily.

It’s May Day, every anarchist’s favorite holiday, and the two 26-year-olds have marked the occasion by releasing a piece of software that represents their best attempt so far to undermine every government in the world. A call from a lawyer friend has reminded them that creative US prosecutors might hit them with conspiracy or other charges. So they’ve decided to skip town.

Half an hour earlier, they pulled out of Wilson’s apartment in Austin and began the long nighttime drive to Dallas, where Wilson has booked Taaki a last-minute flight to Barcelona. Taaki has friends there living in a squat in an abandoned police station. Wilson himself plans to lay low in his hometown of Little Rock, Arkansas. A 29-year-old Canadian friend, cryptographer Peter Todd, is riding along in the back seat.

Not far into the drive, I see Wilson fiddling with something near the gearshift, and he explains that he’s just removed the battery from his cell phone to prevent its being used by police to track him.

Waiting for Dark: Inside Two Anarchists’ Quest for Untraceable Money


Amir Taaki and Cody Wilson are cruising north through Texas on Interstate 35 in the 4:30 am predawn darkness. One of the headlights on the aging BMW Wilson’s driving is burned out, and he’s wearing sunglasses. “They’re prescription,” he says drily.

It’s May Day, every anarchist’s favorite holiday, and the two 26-year-olds have marked the occasion by releasing a piece of software that represents their best attempt so far to undermine every government in the world. A call from a lawyer friend has reminded them that creative US prosecutors might hit them with conspiracy or other charges. So they’ve decided to skip town.

Half an hour earlier, they pulled out of Wilson’s apartment in Austin and began the long nighttime drive to Dallas, where Wilson has booked Taaki a last-minute flight to Barcelona. Taaki has friends there living in a squat in an abandoned police station. Wilson himself plans to lay low in his hometown of Little Rock, Arkansas. A 29-year-old Canadian friend, cryptographer Peter Todd, is riding along in the back seat.

Not far into the drive, I see Wilson fiddling with something near the gearshift, and he explains that he’s just removed the battery from his cell phone to prevent its being used by police to track him.

WASHINGTON — Staci Bivens knew something was seriously wrong when her bosses at Russia Today asked her to put together a story alleging that Germany — Europe’s economic powerhouse — was a failed state.

“It was me and two managers and they had already discussed what they wanted,” Bivens, an American who worked in RT’s Moscow headquarters from 2009 through 2011, said of a meeting she’d had to discuss the segment before a planned reporting trip to Germany. “They called me in and it was really surreal. One of the managers said, ‘The story is that the West is failing, Germany is a failed state.’”

Bivens, who had spent time in Germany, told the managers the story wasn’t true — the term “failed state” is reserved for countries that fail to provide basic government services, like Somalia or Congo, not for economically advanced, industrialized nations like Germany. They insisted. Bivens refused. RT flew a crew to Germany ahead of Bivens, who was flown in later to do a few standups and interviews about racism in Germany. It was the beginning of the end of her RT career.

“At that point I’d been there for a little bit and I’d had enough of the insanity,” Bivens said. She stayed until the end of her contract in 2011 and didn’t make an effort to renew it.

Judging by interviews with seven former and current employees, Bivens’ story is typical. RT, the global English-language news network funded by the Russian government, has come into the spotlight since the Russian invasion of Crimea, which the network has defended tooth-and-nail. The invasion has led to two high-profile rebellions within the ranks: first, an on-air condemnation of the invasion by RT America host Abby Martin, followed days later by the live resignation of another host, Liz Wahl. 

Martin, who hosts an opinion show, said that Russia’s actions were wrong; Wahl, a news anchor, went one step further, saying that she could not work at a network that found Russia’s actions acceptable. 

How The Truth Is Made At Russia Today

WASHINGTON — Staci Bivens knew something was seriously wrong when her bosses at Russia Today asked her to put together a story alleging that Germany — Europe’s economic powerhouse — was a failed state.

“It was me and two managers and they had already discussed what they wanted,” Bivens, an American who worked in RT’s Moscow headquarters from 2009 through 2011, said of a meeting she’d had to discuss the segment before a planned reporting trip to Germany. “They called me in and it was really surreal. One of the managers said, ‘The story is that the West is failing, Germany is a failed state.’”

Bivens, who had spent time in Germany, told the managers the story wasn’t true — the term “failed state” is reserved for countries that fail to provide basic government services, like Somalia or Congo, not for economically advanced, industrialized nations like Germany. They insisted. Bivens refused. RT flew a crew to Germany ahead of Bivens, who was flown in later to do a few standups and interviews about racism in Germany. It was the beginning of the end of her RT career.

“At that point I’d been there for a little bit and I’d had enough of the insanity,” Bivens said. She stayed until the end of her contract in 2011 and didn’t make an effort to renew it.

Judging by interviews with seven former and current employees, Bivens’ story is typical. RT, the global English-language news network funded by the Russian government, has come into the spotlight since the Russian invasion of Crimea, which the network has defended tooth-and-nail. The invasion has led to two high-profile rebellions within the ranks: first, an on-air condemnation of the invasion by RT America host Abby Martin, followed days later by the live resignation of another host, Liz Wahl.

Martin, who hosts an opinion show, said that Russia’s actions were wrong; Wahl, a news anchor, went one step further, saying that she could not work at a network that found Russia’s actions acceptable.

How The Truth Is Made At Russia Today

symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
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symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo
symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.
Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.
ZoomInfo

symboliamag:

Happy anniversary, Symbolia! To celebrate one full year of existence, we’re publishing a very special double issue on OUTER SPACE. Learn about black holes, canals on Mars, space architecture, and more. Subscribe to Symbolia on iPad or via PDF today.

Contributors include: Kyria Abrahams, Serenity Caldwell, MacKenzie Haley, Madeleine Johnson, Kat Leyh, Jed McGowan, Roxanne Palmer, and the Stanford Graphic Novel Project.

It helps to envision modern journalism as a kind of video game. If you’re part of the Internet media, everything you put out into the world comes with its own scoring system. Tweets are counted by retweets and favorites, stories are scored by page views and Facebook likes. A writer’s reach and influence is visible right there, in the number of his followers and the number of “influencers” who subscribe to his or her feed. If you’re wondering why so many writers and journalists from such divergent backgrounds would feel the need to instantly tweet out unconfirmed information to their followers, all you have to do is think of the modern Internet reporter as some form of super Redditor — to be silent is to lose points. To be retweeted is to gain them. We do it for the “karma.”
The only people who have been at Gitmo longer than me are the prisoners.
Miami Herald reporter Carol Rosenberg, who has been covering Guantanamo Bay for the last 12 years, is the subject of a fantastic profile you should probably read.

From The Editor

cheatsheet:

I am very pleased to tell you that Josh Rogin is joining The Daily Beast as senior correspondent later this month, covering politics and national security. We are thrilled to have Josh’s talents joining those of Eli Lake, Eleanor Clift, Michael Tomasky, Michelle Cottle, Daniel Klaidman, David Freedlander, Stuart Stevens, Jon Favreau and David Frum as part of The Beast’s re-energized team under John Avlon’s direction.  

Josh has been a senior staff writer with Foreign Policy magazine since 2009 where he has extensively covered the State and Defense departments, the National Security Council, Congress and the diplomatic communities. He previously wrote on foreign policy for Congressional Quarterly and has also contributed to the Washington Post. Josh is a graduate of the George Washington University, he speaks Japanese and is a recipient of the National Press Foundation’s Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellowship and the 2011 recipient of the Interaction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He is originally from Philadelphia and lives currently in Washington, DC.

Please join me in welcoming Josh!

Tina

So this happened today. Our foreign policy team is getting pretty awesome.

One Year Better: America’s Best High Schools

lostreib:

It’s that time again…America’s Best High Schools time. The list this year is really phenomenal. It’s expanded to 2,000 schools. Nearly 50% more schools applied to be on the list. The methodology was tweaked every-so-slightly, strengthening the metric by which we measure schools. And it includes an interactive, which has been a goal since I first helped to put the list together in 2011.

Just like last year, the process was rewarding and challenging. This was the first time I was the only person to put the list together, which was certainly the biggest hurdle. 

Ultimately, the list is about the schools. At the risk of sounding trite, many of the teachers and administrators of the nation’s top schools work incredibly hard with very few resources and little pay off. There isn’t a blueprint for making students learn or care about learning. 

At it’s core, the list is meant to spotlight great schools. I think it’s getting there.

Lauren worked tirelessly pulling together our list of America’s best high schools. Follow her!

cynicaltechnophile:

newsweek:

What BP Doesn’t Want You To Know About The 2012 Gulf Oil Spill

“It’s as safe as Dawn dishwashing liquid.” 

That’s what Jamie Griffin says the BP man told her about the smelly, rainbow-streaked gunk coating the floor of the “floating hotel” where Griffin was feeding hundreds of cleanup workers during the BP oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. Apparently, the workers were tracking the gunk inside on their boots. Griffin, as chief cook and maid, was trying to clean it. But even boiling water didn’t work.

“The BP representative said, ‘Jamie, just mop it like you’d mop any other dirty floor,’” Griffin recalls in her Louisiana drawl.

It was the opening weeks of what everyone, echoing President Barack Obama, was calling “the worst environmental disaster in American history.” At 9:45 p.m. local time on April 20, 2010, a fiery explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig had killed 11 workers and injured 17. One mile underwater, the Macondo well had blown apart, unleashing a gusher of oil into the gulf. At risk were fishing areas that supplied one third of the seafood consumed in the U.S., beaches from Texas to Florida that drew billions of dollars’ worth of tourism to local economies, and Obama’s chances of reelection. Republicans were blaming him for mishandling the disaster, his poll numbers were falling, even his 11-year-old daughter was demanding, “Daddy, did you plug the hole yet?”

Griffin did as she was told: “I tried Pine-Sol, bleach, I even tried Dawn on those floors.” As she scrubbed, the mix of cleanser and gunk occasionally splashed onto her arms and face.

Within days, the 32-year-old single mother was coughing up blood and suffering constant headaches. She lost her voice. “My throat felt like I’d swallowed razor blades,” she says.

Then things got much worse.

Like hundreds, possibly thousands, of workers on the cleanup, Griffin soon fell ill with a cluster of excruciating, bizarre, grotesque ailments. By July, unstoppable muscle spasms were twisting her hands into immovable claws. In August, she began losing her short-term memory. After cooking professionally for 10 years, she couldn’t remember the recipe for vegetable soup; one morning, she got in the car to go to work, only to discover she hadn’t put on pants. The right side, but only the right side, of her body “started acting crazy. It felt like the nerves were coming out of my skin. It was so painful. My right leg swelled—my ankle would get as wide as my calf—and my skin got incredibly itchy.”

[Photo: Benjamin Lowy/Getty]

Not entirely certain how reliable “The Daily Beast” is. taking with a grain of salt.

First off, this is from Newsweek. And the writer is a Fellow of the New American Foundation who has written about global warming for outlets including the New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Time, NPR, the BBC and The Nation, per his bio. He is the author of six books that have been translated into sixteen languages. Put down the salt. It’s not healthy for you anyways.