Posts tagged magazines

kari-shma:

quick question..

has anyone ever had one of their instagram pictures stolen and published in a magazine without permission/renumeration? If yes, what did you do?

I need advice/help/info/insight/anything?

Writing as a (staffer at a) magazine but not a lawyer, our advice is for you to gather together the evidence that proves they stole it and its yours, and then contact a lawyer. The lawyer should know what to do from there. If you don’t want to go that route, you could always send them a sternly-worded letter asking for compensation and/or cease-and-desist from publishing the photo any further. OK good luck! 

This week’s Newsweek cover: How ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ predicts the future. The story, by Daniel Klaidman, explores the question: Could the Obama administration someday announce that the “war on terror” is over? Klaidman reports on the growing signs that the administration may be debating when to consider the war “finished.” 
An excerpt:


It’s a question that President Obama has quietly discussed with his closest advisers. He has raised the issue publicly only in the vaguest terms: when he said, to rousing cheers on election night, that “a decade of war is ending,” it sounded more like a reference to Afghanistan and Iraq than a statement about the war on terror as a whole. Yet behind the scenes, Obama has led a persistent internal conversation about whether America should remain engaged in a permanent, ever-expanding state of war, one that has pushed the limits of the law, stretched dwindling budgets, and at times strained relations with our allies. “This has always been a concern of the President’s,” says a former military adviser to Obama. “He’s uncomfortable with the idea of war without end.” It is still considered politically treacherous for anyone, especially Democrats, to question whether war is the right framework for fighting terrorism. But just as the intelligence and military communities were criticized twelve years ago for having had too much of a “pre-9/11 mentality,” some in the administration have now begun to gingerly ask whether we today have too much of a “post-9/11” mentality. Or, as one adviser to Obama recently put it to me, “Is it time to start winding down the state of emergency?”


Here’s the full feature. If you’d rather read it on your shiny new iPad, download the issue here.

This week’s Newsweek cover: How ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ predicts the future. The story, by Daniel Klaidman, explores the question: Could the Obama administration someday announce that the “war on terror” is over? Klaidman reports on the growing signs that the administration may be debating when to consider the war “finished.” 

An excerpt:

It’s a question that President Obama has quietly discussed with his closest advisers. He has raised the issue publicly only in the vaguest terms: when he said, to rousing cheers on election night, that “a decade of war is ending,” it sounded more like a reference to Afghanistan and Iraq than a statement about the war on terror as a whole. Yet behind the scenes, Obama has led a persistent internal conversation about whether America should remain engaged in a permanent, ever-expanding state of war, one that has pushed the limits of the law, stretched dwindling budgets, and at times strained relations with our allies. “This has always been a concern of the President’s,” says a former military adviser to Obama. “He’s uncomfortable with the idea of war without end.” It is still considered politically treacherous for anyone, especially Democrats, to question whether war is the right framework for fighting terrorism. But just as the intelligence and military communities were criticized twelve years ago for having had too much of a “pre-9/11 mentality,” some in the administration have now begun to gingerly ask whether we today have too much of a “post-9/11” mentality. Or, as one adviser to Obama recently put it to me, “Is it time to start winding down the state of emergency?”

Here’s the full feature. If you’d rather read it on your shiny new iPad, download the issue here.

Y U NO Print anymore?

We’ll let our editor answer that one: “I think it was a romantic gamble that there was still life to be had for Newsweek. We felt that for the Daily Beast—such a frisky digital brand—to have a print platform as well would be great. And, actually, that proved to be true. But every piece of the Zeitgeist was against Newsweek, combined with an unfixable infrastructure and a set of challenges that really would have required five years in an up economy to solve.” - Tina Brown to New YorkAlso? It costs $42 million to print it.

I think we’ve done a very good magazine. I don’t know whether you’ve been reading it—probably not—but it’s very good. There was a lot of talent here. But it’s like having a refrigerator on each foot—to have this carapace of the print magazine and all its problems, and all its legacy of unsolved issues. Once we shed that, we’ll just be able to focus on the content. I find that very liberating, personally. I think many of the staff do, too.
Tina Brown’s marvelous interview with New York’s Michael Kinsley is fully worth a read this morning. It’s the best.
Does this promote domestic violence?

Though Seymour doesn’t appear to be in pain, Sanctuary for Families, Safe Horizon, Equality Now, and the New York chapter of the National Organization for Women say the image connotes domestic violence with sex and glamour. The groups have reportedly written a letter to Condé Nast’s chairman and editorial director, blasting them for promoting choking as “a sign of passion rather than violence” and asking that the magazine be pulled from newsstands. They’ve already received some 200 signatures on their online petition on Change.org backing up their request. “Choking is not a fashion statement,” the letter reads, “and certainly not something that should be used to sell magazines.”

Does this promote domestic violence?

Though Seymour doesn’t appear to be in pain, Sanctuary for Families, Safe Horizon, Equality Now, and the New York chapter of the National Organization for Women say the image connotes domestic violence with sex and glamour. The groups have reportedly written a letter to Condé Nast’s chairman and editorial director, blasting them for promoting choking as “a sign of passion rather than violence” and asking that the magazine be pulled from newsstands. They’ve already received some 200 signatures on their online petition on Change.org backing up their request. “Choking is not a fashion statement,” the letter reads, “and certainly not something that should be used to sell magazines.”

I kind of felt like I was at the principal’s office. They were super-defensive, saying we were accusing them of all this horrible stuff. The meeting ended in about five minutes, with them calling us horrible accusers. Beauty comes in so many shapes, sizes, and colors—we just want them to portray that in their magazine.
Emma Stydahar and Carina Cruz, the teenagers behind the campaign to get teen magazines to show more “real girls,” say their meeting with the editor and a public-relations representative at Teen Vogue was a wash.