Posts tagged movies
Tell me what terrorist attacks you would have let go forward because you didn’t want to be a mean and nasty fella? Are you going to trade the lives of a number of people because you want to preserve your … your honor? Or are you going to do your job, do what’s required—first and foremost, your responsibility to safeguard America and the lives of its citizens? Now, given a choice between doing what we did, or backing off and saying, ‘We know you know that there’s a terrorist attack against the United States, but we’re not going to force you to tell us what it is because it might create a bad image for us,’ well, that’s not a close call for me.
Dick Cheney is unapologetic in a new Sundance documentaryThe World According to Dick Cheney
Dude, dude, dude, dude, dude, dude, dude, bro, bro, bro, bro, bro, bro, bro, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa!
Jake Gyllenhaal says his ‘End of Watch' co-star Michael Peña is a big fan of the “b” and “d” words.

The AARP Has Suggestions For Movies To Watch To “Get In The Mood”

Among them:

  • Secretary: “a bit kinky but ultimately sweet.”
  • Bull Durham: “I just can’t get over the nail polish scene”
  • Mr. and Mrs. Smith: “The movie that paired Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt in real life as well as on screen, is fun and has a hot moment.”

So, next time you come home on a Saturday night and see “Mr. and Mrs. Smith” on your parents’ TV stand, don’t stick around to say hello. Go directly to your room and fall asleep.

To our elderly friends, get some.

(Background: The AARP tweeted us a few of these links after we tweeted our story about folks in their 60s, 70s, 80s having sex, which is worth a read if you ever plan on aging and want to continue having the sexies.)

Directed by Hollywood’s newest wunderkind, Steven Spielberg, from a screenplay written by Benchley and Carl Gottlieb, Jaws is a grisly film, often ugly as sin, which achieves precisely what it set out to accomplish—scare the hell out of you. As such, it’s destined to become a classic the way all truly terrifying movies, good or bad, become classics of a kind.
We just re-published Newsweek’s 1975 review of Jaws. It premiered on this date in 1975.
nwkarchivist:

“Jaws” Premiered On This Date In 1975

Directed by Hollywood’s newest wunderkind, Steven Spielberg, from a screenplay written by Benchley and Carl Gottlieb, “Jaws” is a grisly film, often ugly as sin, which achieves precisely what it set out to accomplish - scare the hell out of you. As such, it’s destined to become a classic the way all truly terrifying movies, good or bad, become classics of a kind.

Newsweek June 23, 1975

Well, safe to say our review was spot on. 1975 Newsweek subscribers, you’re welcome.
ZoomInfo
nwkarchivist:

“Jaws” Premiered On This Date In 1975

Directed by Hollywood’s newest wunderkind, Steven Spielberg, from a screenplay written by Benchley and Carl Gottlieb, “Jaws” is a grisly film, often ugly as sin, which achieves precisely what it set out to accomplish - scare the hell out of you. As such, it’s destined to become a classic the way all truly terrifying movies, good or bad, become classics of a kind.

Newsweek June 23, 1975

Well, safe to say our review was spot on. 1975 Newsweek subscribers, you’re welcome.
ZoomInfo

nwkarchivist:

“Jaws” Premiered On This Date In 1975

Directed by Hollywood’s newest wunderkind, Steven Spielberg, from a screenplay written by Benchley and Carl Gottlieb, “Jaws” is a grisly film, often ugly as sin, which achieves precisely what it set out to accomplish - scare the hell out of you. As such, it’s destined to become a classic the way all truly terrifying movies, good or bad, become classics of a kind.

Newsweek June 23, 1975

Well, safe to say our review was spot on. 1975 Newsweek subscribers, you’re welcome.

Brat Pack star Molly Ringwald spilled the beans on The Breakfast Club’s lipstick trick last night, calling it all “movie magic.” 

Here’s Molly in a Reddit AMA:

Regarding lipstick, it’s all movie magic. There is a story behind that: John Hughes wrote it but never actually thought about me having to do it. He kept putting it off until the end of filming that long scene. I kept bringing it up, like, “Hey. We gotta figure this out. Are we going to have robotic breasts?” Finally we decided it was better to see less and let everyone assume that I was particularly skilled.”

We’ve got more highlights from her Q&A on the site. But now we know: putting a tube of lipstick in between your boobs and applying it to your lips—hands-free—isn’t possible. Or is it…

nwkarchivist:

“The Godfather” Premiered 40 Years Ago Today

Coppola’s antiphony of themes of innocence and corruption, his artful mixing of domestic detail and cold killing, are what raise this film far about the ordinary gangland epic. The story of the fall of the Cosa Nostra Don, Vito Corleone, and the rise to power of his son, Michael, is as much a story of family loyalty as it is a saga of power struggles in organized crime.

Newsweek March 13, 1972

nwkarchivist:

“The Godfather” Premiered 40 Years Ago Today

Coppola’s antiphony of themes of innocence and corruption, his artful mixing of domestic detail and cold killing, are what raise this film far about the ordinary gangland epic. The story of the fall of the Cosa Nostra Don, Vito Corleone, and the rise to power of his son, Michael, is as much a story of family loyalty as it is a saga of power struggles in organized crime.

Newsweek March 13, 1972

Madonna & Patti Smith, BFF’s [A Tumblr Exclusive!]

By Jacob Bernstein

In the new movie W.E., which Madonna wrote and directed, Abbie Cornish plays a young woman named Wally Winthrop who’s stuck in a bad marriage, and has a kind of imaginary, sister-sister, platonic affair with Wallis Simpson (Andrea Riseborough), the American woman King Edward VIII fell in love with and abdicated the thrown to marry. “How could any man love a woman so much he’d do that?” Winthrop wonders, as she seeks to find out every thing there is to know about Simpson.

In real life, Madonna has been having her own sister-sister, platonic love affair, with Patti Smith, the 65-year-old godmother of the punk movement.

The two met about a year ago at The Berlin Festival and Madonna instantly felt they were “kindred spirits.”

In December, she invited Smith to the Cinema Society screening of W.E at the Museum of Modern Art.

Smith, it turns out, had been a secret admirer of Madonna’s music, their divergent musical styles being no impediment to mutual respect. “I never compared myself to her,” Smith says, “I just loved her songs and enjoyed dancing to them.” (She is particularly enthralled, for the record, by “Into The Groove.”)

Madonna, it turned out, had been a secret admirer of Smith’s for many years, and had devoured Smith’s best-selling memoir, “Just Kids,” which in 2010 won the National Book Award. (She is particularly enthralled by “Because The Night.”)

There was a fair amount in common, although Smith says she’s no “sociologist.”

Smith booked a one way ticket New York in the late sixties, having taken $32 from a purse she found in a bus station in South Orange, New Jersey. She scrounged around the lower east side (and the outer-buroughs), looking for food and shelter, and did time at the Hotel Chelsea. Her best friend (and for some time, lover) was Robert Mapplethorpe, the artist and photographer with whom she discovered the world before he died from AIDS.

Madonna booked a one way ticket to New York in the in the late seventies, arriving with $35. She scrounged around the lower east side looking for food and shelter, and eventually did time at the Hotel Chelsea. Her best friend during the early years was an artist and designer named Martin Burgoyne, who was gay, discovered the world with her, and then died from AIDS.

There were other similarities: both were iconoclastic artists with a penchant for pushing people’s buttons.

Smith did songs like “Rock N Roll Nigger” and had album covers featuring her hairy armpits.

Record stores refused to stock them.

Madonna did music videos featuring overt-sexual imagery.

MTV refused to play them.

And both women are a strange brew of high and low culture, with a taste that ran from Jean-Luc Godard, Pablo Picasso and Diego Rivera to the sidewalks.

If there’s an essential philosophical difference between Smith and Madonna it’s that Smith really opted out of commercial culture, while Madonna took what she learned on the margins and made it mainstream.

When Madonna got up to give her speech about W.E. at a screening in December, she got positively verklempt upon noting Smith’s presence in the audience. She said it was “humbling” to be in front of Smith, an artist she’d “looked up to,” for many years, a “revolutionary in her work, “a renaissance woman.”

Later, when the movie ended, it was Smith who practically led the standing ovation.

“I loved the film,” Smith says. “I was completely engaged from the first minute. It’s beautifully shot and beautifully cast. I enjoyed the story. The performances are all excellent but Andrea Riseborough’s performance is brilliant.”

The following month, when it made its official debut at The Ziegfeld, Smith was back to see it a second time. “I was invited to see it again and I saw it again. I like to see movies multiple times. I thought Madonna did an excellent job. To me it stands on its own. I don’t look it as a Madonna movie. It’s W.E. and I liked it very much.”

Ramin Goes to a Screening of ‘One for the Money’

Ramin Setoodeh reviews “One for the Money” in real-time on his BlackBerry:

Midnight. Rain. Cold. Sleep. Which of these things did I not experience last night? On Friday morning at 12:01 a.m., I went to the movies to see One for the Money, the new Katherine Heigl crime caper that’s so lousy the studio wouldn’t screen it early for critics. I had to watch it at the first public showing in a Manhattan theater, with all of Heigl’s groupies, if they exist. Here’s what happened, as recorded in real-time on my Blackberry.

The review.

Warner Brothers Will Make Netflix, Redbox, Blockbuster Wait Longer For New Movieshttp://allthingsd.com/20120105/warner-brothers-will-make-netflix-redbox-blockbuster-wait-longer-for-new-movies/

tanya77:

caterpillarcowboy:

You must be kidding me. Are movie studios this out of touch? You think theater revenues and DVD revenues are going to reverse their downward trend if you punish your customers by making them wait an extra 28 days? This isn’t some Econ 101 discussion about substitutes. This change is structural.

Like I said.

Warner Brothers doesn’t care about digital people.