Posts tagged nasa
Antarctic Ice Melt Has ‘Passed the Point of No Return’
Vast glaciers in West Antarctica seem to be locked in an irreversible thaw linked to global warming that may push up sea levels for centuries, scientists said on Monday.
Six glaciers, eaten away from below by a warming of sea waters around the frozen continent, were flowing fast into the Amundsen Sea, according to the report based partly on satellite radar measurements from 1992 to 2011.
Evidence shows “a large sector of the West Antarctic ice sheet has gone into a state of irreversible retreat”, said lead author Eric Rignot of the University of California, Irvine, and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Antarctic Ice Melt Has ‘Passed the Point of No Return’

Vast glaciers in West Antarctica seem to be locked in an irreversible thaw linked to global warming that may push up sea levels for centuries, scientists said on Monday.

Six glaciers, eaten away from below by a warming of sea waters around the frozen continent, were flowing fast into the Amundsen Sea, according to the report based partly on satellite radar measurements from 1992 to 2011.

Evidence shows “a large sector of the West Antarctic ice sheet has gone into a state of irreversible retreat”, said lead author Eric Rignot of the University of California, Irvine, and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

In an unlikely corner of our solar system, scientists have discovered evidence of what they believe is a subterranean ocean. The water means a tiny moon orbiting Saturn could be one of the few places in the solar system with the right ingredients for life. 

The moon Enceladus is only 300 miles wide—it would fit between New York City and Charlottesville, Va. It’s a mini-world with a bright, icy, frigid surface, and it is just one of an astounding 62 moons orbiting the ringed planet. But it is not just a static, boring ice ball. Fractures on the moon’s surface—evocatively named “tiger stripes”—emit jets of frozen water that help form one of the bands in Saturn’s rings. 

Ocean as Large as Lake Superior Found on Enceladus, a Tiny Moon Orbiting Saturn

In an unlikely corner of our solar system, scientists have discovered evidence of what they believe is a subterranean ocean. The water means a tiny moon orbiting Saturn could be one of the few places in the solar system with the right ingredients for life.

The moon Enceladus is only 300 miles wide—it would fit between New York City and Charlottesville, Va. It’s a mini-world with a bright, icy, frigid surface, and it is just one of an astounding 62 moons orbiting the ringed planet. But it is not just a static, boring ice ball. Fractures on the moon’s surface—evocatively named “tiger stripes”—emit jets of frozen water that help form one of the bands in Saturn’s rings.

Ocean as Large as Lake Superior Found on Enceladus, a Tiny Moon Orbiting Saturn

Super legit photography of the Enterprise Shuttle on its New York City fly-by earlier this morning. We spotted Eric Hwang (go visit his website!) on the 9th floor of IAC with a killer camera snapping away, so naturally asked if we could run some of his photos on the tumblr. Thanks Eric! These are great!!
ZoomInfo
Super legit photography of the Enterprise Shuttle on its New York City fly-by earlier this morning. We spotted Eric Hwang (go visit his website!) on the 9th floor of IAC with a killer camera snapping away, so naturally asked if we could run some of his photos on the tumblr. Thanks Eric! These are great!!
ZoomInfo
Super legit photography of the Enterprise Shuttle on its New York City fly-by earlier this morning. We spotted Eric Hwang (go visit his website!) on the 9th floor of IAC with a killer camera snapping away, so naturally asked if we could run some of his photos on the tumblr. Thanks Eric! These are great!!
ZoomInfo
Super legit photography of the Enterprise Shuttle on its New York City fly-by earlier this morning. We spotted Eric Hwang (go visit his website!) on the 9th floor of IAC with a killer camera snapping away, so naturally asked if we could run some of his photos on the tumblr. Thanks Eric! These are great!!
ZoomInfo
Super legit photography of the Enterprise Shuttle on its New York City fly-by earlier this morning. We spotted Eric Hwang (go visit his website!) on the 9th floor of IAC with a killer camera snapping away, so naturally asked if we could run some of his photos on the tumblr. Thanks Eric! These are great!!
ZoomInfo

Super legit photography of the Enterprise Shuttle on its New York City fly-by earlier this morning. We spotted Eric Hwang (go visit his website!) on the 9th floor of IAC with a killer camera snapping away, so naturally asked if we could run some of his photos on the tumblr. Thanks Eric! These are great!!

The Enterprise Shuttle, Instagrammed, naturally, as it flies by New York City on the way to its forever home at the Intrepid.

The Enterprise Shuttle, Instagrammed, naturally, as it flies by New York City on the way to its forever home at the Intrepid.

nwkarchivist:

On This Date 45 Years Ago:

‘FIRE IN THE SPACECRAFT!’
Relaxing supine in contour couches in a newly  minted spacecraft, the three astronauts seemed safe as men watching  television in a living room.  Then at 6:31 p.m. EST it happened.  “Fire  in the spacecraft!” an astronaut shouted over the communications hookup.  On the TV monitor, the men in the blockhouse simultaneously saw the  capsule obscured in a flash of fire and smoke.  It was over in an  instant.  The atmosphere in the cabin was pure, 100 per cent oxygen.   With a great whoosh, like the sound of an oven being lit, the pure 02 in  the cabin made every combustible item in the ship burn with super   intensity.  Death for all three astronauts was instantaneous- either by   incineration or asphyxiation.

Newsweek February 6, 1967

This happened on January 27th, 1967—45 years ago today. The dead: Astronauts Gus Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chaffee. May they rest in space.

nwkarchivist:

On This Date 45 Years Ago:

‘FIRE IN THE SPACECRAFT!’

Relaxing supine in contour couches in a newly minted spacecraft, the three astronauts seemed safe as men watching television in a living room.  Then at 6:31 p.m. EST it happened.  “Fire in the spacecraft!” an astronaut shouted over the communications hookup. On the TV monitor, the men in the blockhouse simultaneously saw the capsule obscured in a flash of fire and smoke.  It was over in an instant.  The atmosphere in the cabin was pure, 100 per cent oxygen.  With a great whoosh, like the sound of an oven being lit, the pure 02 in the cabin made every combustible item in the ship burn with super intensity.  Death for all three astronauts was instantaneous- either by incineration or asphyxiation.

Newsweek February 6, 1967

This happened on January 27th, 1967—45 years ago today. The dead: Astronauts Gus Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chaffee. May they rest in space.

Newsweek & The Daily Beast staffers (and editor) gather in the newsroom to watch Atlantis’ final flight as NASA closes its doors on the historic space shuttle program.

Newsweek & The Daily Beast staffers (and editor) gather in the newsroom to watch Atlantis’ final flight as NASA closes its doors on the historic space shuttle program.

In April 1981 Newsweek published a cover story on the Space Shuttle program, then just getting underway with the launch of Columbia that week from Kennedy Space Center. In it, the editors call the program “the most spectacular sales promotion in history,” predicting that the future in space lies in fact with private industry—a belief mirrored by the Obama administration nearly three decades later:

Once investment in space loses its element of risk, predicts NASA’s Bekey, “industry will jump in.” If so, Columbia’s historic voyage may turn out to be not only a splendid technical and scientific achievement, but also perhaps the most spectacular sales promotion in history. Even as mankind’s great adventure in space is getting under way, it is also, in a sense, ending. Impelled by the dual human imperatives to explore—and to see if some money can be made at it—we have begun to probe the very fringes of a great uncharted sea; already, we want to know where the best fishing is.

Newsweek, 4/27/1981

In April 1981 Newsweek published a cover story on the Space Shuttle program, then just getting underway with the launch of Columbia that week from Kennedy Space Center. In it, the editors call the program “the most spectacular sales promotion in history,” predicting that the future in space lies in fact with private industry—a belief mirrored by the Obama administration nearly three decades later:

Once investment in space loses its element of risk, predicts NASA’s Bekey, “industry will jump in.” If so, Columbia’s historic voyage may turn out to be not only a splendid technical and scientific achievement, but also perhaps the most spectacular sales promotion in history. Even as mankind’s great adventure in space is getting under way, it is also, in a sense, ending. Impelled by the dual human imperatives to explore—and to see if some money can be made at it—we have begun to probe the very fringes of a great uncharted sea; already, we want to know where the best fishing is.

Newsweek, 4/27/1981