Posts tagged nation

Three Words for Gay Teens: It Gets Betterhttp://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130268587&sc=tumblr&cc=freshair

nprfreshair:

“I got picked on. I got mocked. I got a little scar on my chin when a bully turned my desk over in study hall, with me in it, and my face hit the floor. That was seventh grade. But you know what? It gets better.”

via NPR Arts Editor Trey Graham.

The latest genius of Dan Savage, editor of our little hometown alt-weekly, The Stranger. (We only learned recently what “the stranger” stands for. Sick.)

(via theweekmagazine)

The failure of the economics profession to address our deeper problems theoretically is mirrored by the failure of other sciences on a more practical level. To wit: America’s best minds are still heading to Wall Street to an unnerving, even pathological degree—further evidence that finance remains the dominant sector of the economy.
Michael Hirsh, in his final column for Newsweek, on why, with America in trouble, our economists are AWOL and our scientists are off “financial engineering”
There’s only one problem with [House Minority Leader] Boehner’s message: so far, the things that Republicans have said they want to do won’t actually boost employment or reduce deficits. In fact, much the opposite. By combing through a variety of studies and projections from nonpartisan economic sources, we here at Gaggle headquarters have found that if Republicans were in charge from January 2009 onward—and if they were now given carte blanche to enact the proposals they want to—the projected 2010–2020 deficits would be larger than they are under Obama, and fewer people would probably be employed.
Andrew Romano, on why there’d be fewer jobs and bigger deficits if Republicans were in charge.

markcoatney:

kateoplis:

Katrina, a year later by Vincent Laforet

Hundreds of years ago, when I first started working at Time, I was taught that anniversary stories are some of the lowest forms of journalism around, and that Time would never stoop to them (clearly, that publication is in a much different place now). 
But for Katrina, I think it’s important to suspend this rule, because it really was a critical moment. If there is any real, fundamental danger to America (as opposed to all of Fox’s made-up stuff, that is), this is it: That the country will fail because its government does not provide even minimally competent services to its citizens. 
Look at Vince’s pictures—they’re fantastic; see NOLA’s really nice five year’s after coverage (and remember what an amazing, essential job that paper did in 2005); watch ABC’s livestream from there today. 


You can find Newsweek’s Katrina coverage here, and we second the plug for ABC’s livestream coverage from there, starting at 12:30 EST today.

markcoatney:

kateoplis:

Katrina, a year later by Vincent Laforet

Hundreds of years ago, when I first started working at Time, I was taught that anniversary stories are some of the lowest forms of journalism around, and that Time would never stoop to them (clearly, that publication is in a much different place now). 

But for Katrina, I think it’s important to suspend this rule, because it really was a critical moment. If there is any real, fundamental danger to America (as opposed to all of Fox’s made-up stuff, that is), this is it: That the country will fail because its government does not provide even minimally competent services to its citizens. 

Look at Vince’s pictures—they’re fantastic; see NOLA’s really nice five year’s after coverage (and remember what an amazing, essential job that paper did in 2005); watch ABC’s livestream from there today. 

You can find Newsweek’s Katrina coverage here, and we second the plug for ABC’s livestream coverage from there, starting at 12:30 EST today.

Why Sarah Palin Should Be Able to Call Herself a Feministhttp://www.newsweek.com/2010/08/20/why-sarah-palin-should-be-able-to-call-herself-a-feminist.html

"The fact that Sarah Palin wants to call herself a feminist is astonishing. It’s not that she is conservative—there have been plenty of conservative, eccentric, and outlier feminists in history. It’s that it has been such an unloved, if proud, term for so long that it is odd to watch it being fought over, as though it were a political asset and not something women used to have to pretend not to be so they didn’t upset any voters.” -Julia Baird

Breitbart: I'd Like to Speak to Sherrod in Privatehttp://www.newsweek.com/blogs/the-gaggle/2010/07/30/breitbart-i-d-like-to-speak-with-sherrod-in-private.html

From Daniel Stone’s interview with Andrew Breitbart:

But do you agree that the edited video took things out of context?
Well, yes. But I put up what I had. It granted a great portion of her redemptive tale, but not all of it. If I could do it all over again, I should have waited for the full video to get to me.

So why not apologize for that?
I’d first like to speak to her in private and outside of the media circus.

Do you regret how this all went down?
Look, there’s a lot of blame to go around on this story, and it’s very convenient to try to place it all on me when the Obama administration and the NAACP were also involved. I don’t think anybody looks particularly good in this thing.

What does it mean to tell the truth about a war? Is it a lie, technically speaking, for the Administration to say that it has faith in Hamid Karzai’s government and regards him as a legitimate leader—or is it just absurd? Is it a lie to say that we have a plan for Afghanistan that makes any sense at all? If you put it that way, each of the WikiLeaks documents—from an account of an armed showdown between the Afghan police and the Afghan Army, to a few lines about a local interdiction official taking seventy-five-dollar bribes, to a sad exchange about an aid scam involving orphans—is a pixel in a picture that does, indeed, contradict official accounts of the war, and rather drastically so.

Michael Lewis’s The Big Short is considered the definitive history of the financial crisis. But to understand American finance, you need to understand Ace Cash Express as well as you do Goldman Sachs. Which is why Gary Rivlin’s Broke, USA is a necessary companion. While Lewis tells the story of mortgage-backed assets and the bankers who flogged them, Rivlin tells the story of the underlying mortgages and the folks who bought them. “To me, it was so counterintuitive,” Rivlin says. “People with no money in their pockets is good for business?” But they were profitable. By 1996, there were more payday lenders than all the McDonald’s and Burger Kings in the land combined.

Welders looking for an advance on a paycheck became unwitting cash cows for big banks. Schoolteachers taking out home loans became the collateral for leveraged bets on housing worked out in London and Greenwich, Conn. But before they were Wall Street grist, the working poor had to first become big business.

Unlike traditional banking, it wasn’t about finding good credit risks who could repay their loans promptly. Quite the opposite, actually. The central insight was that you wanted people who couldn’t quite stay ahead of the loan. Then you could use late fees and new loans to bleed them.

Ezra Klein, on one of the under-reported aspects of the financial meltdown. For a fantastic account of this whole ugly business, see Daniel Brook’s really nice “Usury Country” in Harpers.

Even Springsteen couldn't make Jersey this coolhttp://www.newsweek.com/2010/07/23/i-heart-nj.html

alittlespace:

Andrew Romano on one of my favorite subjects: the Garden State.

“…the Jersey trend taps into the defining cultural obsession of the moment: the allure of authenticity. In cities from Portland, Ore., to Portland, Maine, bookish lumberjack types are wearing hunting garments to art galleries and brunch. It is difficult to find a new restaurant that doesn’t require its brick to be exposed, its wood to be reclaimed, and its bartenders to be mustachioed. Heritage brands—Levi’s, Keds, Filson—have never been hotter. The attraction is simple: by consuming the “actual article” (or, more often, a carefully crafted simulacrum), urbanites everywhere feel they’re distancing themselves from the increasingly insubstantial, Internet-driven nature of contemporary life. As states go, New Jersey may be the ultimate real deal. It isn’t obvious. It isn’t marketed or mythologized. It isn’t easy to love. It just is. By scarfing down a tray of disco fries with gravy and ricotta at St. Anselm, or by admiring the unheralded output of small Garden State manufacturers at Kiosk, consumers are subscribing to a sensibility that’s very much in vogue right now. New Jersey is just the vehicle du jour.”