Posts tagged new york city
As much of the country endures from the heavy snowfall and bitter cold that has marked the start of 2014, municipalities in 26 states will rely on a crucial tool in clearing their roads: salt. Because the freezing point of salty water is a lower temperature than pure water, scattering some salt atop ice or snow can help accelerate the melting process, opening up the roads to traffic that much sooner.
It’s estimated that more than 22 million tons of salt are scattered on the roads of the U.S. annually—about 137 pounds of salt for every American. But all that salt has to go somewhere. After it dissolves—and is split into sodium and chloride ions—it gets carried away via runoff and deposited into both surface water (streams, lakes and rivers) and the groundwater under our feet. Consider how easily salt can corrode your car.
Unsurprisingly, it’s also a problem for the surrounding environment—so much that in 2004, Canada categorized road salt as a toxin and placed new guidelines on its use. And as more and more of the U.S. becomes urbanized and suburbanized, and as a greater number of roads criss-cross the landscape, the mounting piles of salt we dump on them may be getting to be a bigger problem than ever. Data from long-term studies of watersheds bear this out.
A group of scientists that tracked salt levels from 1952 to 1998 in the Mohawk River in Upstate New York, for instance, found that concentrations of sodium and chloride increased by 130 and 243 percent, respectively, with road salting the primary reason as the surround area became more developed.
More recently, a study of a stream in southeastern New York State that was monitored from 1986 to 2005 found a similar pattern, with significant annual increases and road salting to blame for an estimated 91 percent of sodium chloride in the watershed.
What Happens to All the Salt We Dump On the Roads?

As much of the country endures from the heavy snowfall and bitter cold that has marked the start of 2014, municipalities in 26 states will rely on a crucial tool in clearing their roads: salt. Because the freezing point of salty water is a lower temperature than pure water, scattering some salt atop ice or snow can help accelerate the melting process, opening up the roads to traffic that much sooner.

It’s estimated that more than 22 million tons of salt are scattered on the roads of the U.S. annually—about 137 pounds of salt for every American. But all that salt has to go somewhere. After it dissolves—and is split into sodium and chloride ions—it gets carried away via runoff and deposited into both surface water (streams, lakes and rivers) and the groundwater under our feet. Consider how easily salt can corrode your car.

Unsurprisingly, it’s also a problem for the surrounding environment—so much that in 2004, Canada categorized road salt as a toxin and placed new guidelines on its use. And as more and more of the U.S. becomes urbanized and suburbanized, and as a greater number of roads criss-cross the landscape, the mounting piles of salt we dump on them may be getting to be a bigger problem than ever. Data from long-term studies of watersheds bear this out.

A group of scientists that tracked salt levels from 1952 to 1998 in the Mohawk River in Upstate New York, for instance, found that concentrations of sodium and chloride increased by 130 and 243 percent, respectively, with road salting the primary reason as the surround area became more developed.

More recently, a study of a stream in southeastern New York State that was monitored from 1986 to 2005 found a similar pattern, with significant annual increases and road salting to blame for an estimated 91 percent of sodium chloride in the watershed.

What Happens to All the Salt We Dump On the Roads?

nwkarchivist:

Ten Years Ago- Where Were You When The Lights Went Out?

Deprived of ‘Extreme Makeover,’ New Yorkers drank up all the cold beer in the bars, then started on the warm; lit bonfires in the park and danced.  And then they lay down under the stars and hoped for a breeze.

Newsweek  August 25, 2003

10 years ago!
ZoomInfo
nwkarchivist:

Ten Years Ago- Where Were You When The Lights Went Out?

Deprived of ‘Extreme Makeover,’ New Yorkers drank up all the cold beer in the bars, then started on the warm; lit bonfires in the park and danced.  And then they lay down under the stars and hoped for a breeze.

Newsweek  August 25, 2003

10 years ago!
ZoomInfo
nwkarchivist:

Ten Years Ago- Where Were You When The Lights Went Out?

Deprived of ‘Extreme Makeover,’ New Yorkers drank up all the cold beer in the bars, then started on the warm; lit bonfires in the park and danced.  And then they lay down under the stars and hoped for a breeze.

Newsweek  August 25, 2003

10 years ago!
ZoomInfo

nwkarchivist:

Ten Years Ago- Where Were You When The Lights Went Out?

Deprived of ‘Extreme Makeover,’ New Yorkers drank up all the cold beer in the bars, then started on the warm; lit bonfires in the park and danced.  And then they lay down under the stars and hoped for a breeze.

Newsweek  August 25, 2003

10 years ago!

theworstroom:

Prospect Lefferts Gardens, Brooklyn.
“Looking for two roommates.” 
“Top bunk is $500 per month, bottom bunk is $600 per month.”

Wait. Top bunk is cheaper? Are they crazy!? This is a steal.

theworstroom:

Prospect Lefferts Gardens, Brooklyn.

“Looking for two roommates.” 

“Top bunk is $500 per month, bottom bunk is $600 per month.”

Wait. Top bunk is cheaper? Are they crazy!? This is a steal.

(Source: theworstroom)

In 1987, novelist Tom Wolfe evoked the passion of New York and Wall Street culture in the famous book Bonfire of the Vanities. The traders of the 1980s were described as “masters of the universe.” But what’s it like working there today? For this week’s Newsweek, Wolfe revisits that subject by focusing on Wall Street as it is today.
An excerpt:



Up until 2006 a spirit of manly daring had pervaded Wall Street’s investment bankers. Trading stocks and bonds was the next thing to armed combat. The warriors, i.e., traders and salesmen, told of how fighting in combat—confronting not an armed enemy but a fan-shaped array of computer screens—created a euphoria more exhilarating than any other conceivable state of mind. It was the highest of all highs—and thanks not only to the earth-orbiting ecstasy of the battle. There was also the not inconspicuous fact that these Boomtime Boys—many of them in their 20s, still young enough to blush—were knocking back a million dollars or more a year in bonuses, year after year …



Victory as recorded on those screens made them feel like Masters of the Universe. The phrase came from a 1987 novel, The Bonfire of the Vanities, whose main character, Sherman McCoy, is a 38-year-old trading-floor salesman for an investment bank averaging a million dollars a year in bonuses and living on the top-nob part of Park Avenue. One day his trading-floor telephone rings, and he picks it up and takes a buy order for so many zero-coupon bonds his commission will be $50,000. Took 20 seconds, maybe 30, and—just like that—he’s $50,000 richer! The words suddenly flash into the Broca’s area of his brain: “I’m a Master of the Universe!” Jesus Christ!—came straight from his 6-year-old daughter’s toy set of plastic figurines, the “Masters of the Universe,” who had names like Ahor, Blutong, and Thonk and look like Norse gods who pump iron and drink creatine and human-growth-hormone smoothies.



In real life, young men on trading floors all over Wall Street read that book and got a kick out of that name, Masters of the Universe. They said it aloud only in a jocular way—they weren’t fools, after all—and never mentioned the wave of exaltation that swept through their very souls: I’m a Master of the Universe …


The market crash in November 1987 didn’t diminish that sublime bliss for longer than a few gulps. Likewise the “dotcom” crash of 2000—02. Even after 2002 the Masters of the Universe cast such a spell that an estimated 40 percent of the top 10 percent of the graduates of Harvard, Yale, and Princeton headed for jobs on Wall Street.



In 2004 a well-known trader for Deutsche Bank, John Coates, a Canadian, absolutely baffled his mates, his fellow warriors of the battle screens, by quitting Wall Street and heading off to England to re-up at his alma mater, Cambridge University, as a first-year graduate student in neuroscience. Neuroscience?! In a Second World country, England?!



The truth was, Coates never got Wall Street off of his mind for a moment. He was intrigued by the fact that a bunch of impulsive, juiced-up, howling, heedless young men had their hands on billions of dollars every day. He was turning to neuroscience in hopes of finding out what on earth could possibly account for… the Masters of the Universe.




Read it online today—or check out the iPad app for a few extra videos we made with the novelist.

Up until 2006 a spirit of manly daring had pervaded Wall Street’s investment bankers. Trading stocks and bonds was the next thing to armed combat. The warriors, i.e., traders and salesmen, told of how fighting in combat—confronting not an armed enemy but a fan-shaped array of computer screens—created a euphoria more exhilarating than any other conceivable state of mind. It was the highest of all highs—and thanks not only to the earth-orbiting ecstasy of the battle. There was also the not inconspicuous fact that these Boomtime Boys—many of them in their 20s, still young enough to blush—were knocking back a million dollars or more a year in bonuses, year after year …

Victory as recorded on those screens made them feel like Masters of the Universe. The phrase came from a 1987 novel, The Bonfire of the Vanities, whose main character, Sherman McCoy, is a 38-year-old trading-floor salesman for an investment bank averaging a million dollars a year in bonuses and living on the top-nob part of Park Avenue. One day his trading-floor telephone rings, and he picks it up and takes a buy order for so many zero-coupon bonds his commission will be $50,000. Took 20 seconds, maybe 30, and—just like that—he’s $50,000 richer! The words suddenly flash into the Broca’s area of his brain: “I’m a Master of the Universe!” Jesus Christ!—came straight from his 6-year-old daughter’s toy set of plastic figurines, the “Masters of the Universe,” who had names like Ahor, Blutong, and Thonk and look like Norse gods who pump iron and drink creatine and human-growth-hormone smoothies.

In real life, young men on trading floors all over Wall Street read that book and got a kick out of that name, Masters of the Universe. They said it aloud only in a jocular way—they weren’t fools, after all—and never mentioned the wave of exaltation that swept through their very souls: I’m a Master of the Universe

The market crash in November 1987 didn’t diminish that sublime bliss for longer than a few gulps. Likewise the “dotcom” crash of 2000—02. Even after 2002 the Masters of the Universe cast such a spell that an estimated 40 percent of the top 10 percent of the graduates of Harvard, Yale, and Princeton headed for jobs on Wall Street.

In 2004 a well-known trader for Deutsche Bank, John Coates, a Canadian, absolutely baffled his mates, his fellow warriors of the battle screens, by quitting Wall Street and heading off to England to re-up at his alma mater, Cambridge University, as a first-year graduate student in neuroscience. Neuroscience?! In a Second World country, England?!

The truth was, Coates never got Wall Street off of his mind for a moment. He was intrigued by the fact that a bunch of impulsive, juiced-up, howling, heedless young men had their hands on billions of dollars every day. He was turning to neuroscience in hopes of finding out what on earth could possibly account for… the Masters of the Universe.

nwkarchivist:

35 Years Ago, New York City Blacks Out

On a muggy dog-day evening last week, a vagrant summer storm knocked out high-voltage power lines in the near New York exurbs—and within the hour returned 9 million people to the dark, heat and disquiet of a pre-electric age … And it underscored once again the fragility of urban American in the last quarter of the twentieth century—a state of dependence so total that a burst of lightning could shut down the nation’s largest city as surely and nearly as completely as a neutron bomb.

Newsweek, July, 25, 1977

Another “this day in history” for y’all. 
ZoomInfo
nwkarchivist:

35 Years Ago, New York City Blacks Out

On a muggy dog-day evening last week, a vagrant summer storm knocked out high-voltage power lines in the near New York exurbs—and within the hour returned 9 million people to the dark, heat and disquiet of a pre-electric age … And it underscored once again the fragility of urban American in the last quarter of the twentieth century—a state of dependence so total that a burst of lightning could shut down the nation’s largest city as surely and nearly as completely as a neutron bomb.

Newsweek, July, 25, 1977

Another “this day in history” for y’all. 
ZoomInfo
nwkarchivist:

35 Years Ago, New York City Blacks Out

On a muggy dog-day evening last week, a vagrant summer storm knocked out high-voltage power lines in the near New York exurbs—and within the hour returned 9 million people to the dark, heat and disquiet of a pre-electric age … And it underscored once again the fragility of urban American in the last quarter of the twentieth century—a state of dependence so total that a burst of lightning could shut down the nation’s largest city as surely and nearly as completely as a neutron bomb.

Newsweek, July, 25, 1977

Another “this day in history” for y’all. 
ZoomInfo

nwkarchivist:

35 Years Ago, New York City Blacks Out

On a muggy dog-day evening last week, a vagrant summer storm knocked out high-voltage power lines in the near New York exurbs—and within the hour returned 9 million people to the dark, heat and disquiet of a pre-electric age … And it underscored once again the fragility of urban American in the last quarter of the twentieth century—a state of dependence so total that a burst of lightning could shut down the nation’s largest city as surely and nearly as completely as a neutron bomb.

Newsweek, July, 25, 1977

Another “this day in history” for y’all.