Posts tagged new york times
"I first encountered the South African photographer Zanele Muholi two winters ago in her native country. I was so shy and in awe of her work that I half-hoped she wouldn’t remember that last encounter. 

"As the foremost chronicler of black lesbians and transgender people in South Africa, Ms. Muholi is an artist and activist, advocating for rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people on a continent where they are under attack. We met at a Cape Town hotel amid a crowd of people, waiting for the Nigerian musician Femi Kuti to perform. 

"Ms. Muholi was playing pool with a stylish gang of girlfriends, all slouchy denim and cool T-shirts. We started talking about mutual friends, my writing and whether her femme friend — who was present — was gaining too much weight. 

After a little while, she turned to me seriously. “So, Alexis,” she said, a smile drawing out on her face. “Why are you so interested in L.G.B.T. people, anyway?” I said something about being a loyal ally. “O.K.,” she said, still wearing a teasing smile. “Allies are important, too.” 

Photographing a ‘Difficult Love’ in South Africa

"I first encountered the South African photographer Zanele Muholi two winters ago in her native country. I was so shy and in awe of her work that I half-hoped she wouldn’t remember that last encounter.

"As the foremost chronicler of black lesbians and transgender people in South Africa, Ms. Muholi is an artist and activist, advocating for rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people on a continent where they are under attack. We met at a Cape Town hotel amid a crowd of people, waiting for the Nigerian musician Femi Kuti to perform.

"Ms. Muholi was playing pool with a stylish gang of girlfriends, all slouchy denim and cool T-shirts. We started talking about mutual friends, my writing and whether her femme friend — who was present — was gaining too much weight.

After a little while, she turned to me seriously. “So, Alexis,” she said, a smile drawing out on her face. “Why are you so interested in L.G.B.T. people, anyway?” I said something about being a loyal ally. “O.K.,” she said, still wearing a teasing smile. “Allies are important, too.”

Photographing a ‘Difficult Love’ in South Africa

In Boston last week to deliver the commencement address at the Berklee College of Music, Jimmy Page, the founder of Led Zeppelin, learned to his surprise that the school had a course in which his guitar licks were minutely analyzed. “They go into all these things and deconstruct them,” he said, “the harmonies and the voicings and the progressions, the arrangements.” 

For Mr. Page, who turned 70 in January, the encounter was a reminder not just of his exalted status among guitarists but also of the practical applications of a project that occupied his attention for the better part of the last three years. Track by track, he has been remastering the entire Led Zeppelin catalog of nine studio albums and combing through the group’s archives looking for alternative versions that can illuminate how the band created songs that came to define 1970s rock and influence generations of musicians since. 

“I knew it was a long haul, that it would involve hundreds of hours of tape,” he said in an interview in New York on Wednesday. “I had to listen to everything, every bootleg that was out there, too. But it has to be done if you’re going to do something really authoritative. I wanted to be sure this holds up, and I hate to think, if I wasn’t around, what was going to happen.” 

Remastering, Reflecting: Everything Still Turns to Gold - NYTimes.com

In Boston last week to deliver the commencement address at the Berklee College of Music, Jimmy Page, the founder of Led Zeppelin, learned to his surprise that the school had a course in which his guitar licks were minutely analyzed. “They go into all these things and deconstruct them,” he said, “the harmonies and the voicings and the progressions, the arrangements.”

For Mr. Page, who turned 70 in January, the encounter was a reminder not just of his exalted status among guitarists but also of the practical applications of a project that occupied his attention for the better part of the last three years. Track by track, he has been remastering the entire Led Zeppelin catalog of nine studio albums and combing through the group’s archives looking for alternative versions that can illuminate how the band created songs that came to define 1970s rock and influence generations of musicians since.

“I knew it was a long haul, that it would involve hundreds of hours of tape,” he said in an interview in New York on Wednesday. “I had to listen to everything, every bootleg that was out there, too. But it has to be done if you’re going to do something really authoritative. I wanted to be sure this holds up, and I hate to think, if I wasn’t around, what was going to happen.”

Remastering, Reflecting: Everything Still Turns to Gold - NYTimes.com

Before the collapse of the U.S. financial system in 2008, Brad Katsuyama could tell himself that he bore no responsibility for that system. He worked for the Royal Bank of Canada, for a start. 

RBC might have been the fifth-biggest bank in North America, by some measures, but it was on nobody’s mental map of Wall Street. It was stable and relatively virtuous and soon to be known for having resisted the temptation to make bad subprime loans to Americans or peddle them to ignorant investors. 

But its management didn’t understand just what an afterthought the bank was — on the rare occasions American financiers thought about it at all. 

Katsuyama’s bosses sent him to New York from Toronto in 2002, when he was 23, as part of a “big push” for the bank to become a player on Wall Street. 

The sad truth was that hardly anyone noticed it. “The people in Canada are always saying, ‘We’re paying too much for people in the United States,’ ” Katsuyama says. “What they don’t realize is that the reason you have to pay them too much is that no one wants to work for RBC. RBC is a nobody.” 

An Adaptation From ‘Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,’ by Michael Lewis - NYTimes.com

Before the collapse of the U.S. financial system in 2008, Brad Katsuyama could tell himself that he bore no responsibility for that system. He worked for the Royal Bank of Canada, for a start.

RBC might have been the fifth-biggest bank in North America, by some measures, but it was on nobody’s mental map of Wall Street. It was stable and relatively virtuous and soon to be known for having resisted the temptation to make bad subprime loans to Americans or peddle them to ignorant investors.

But its management didn’t understand just what an afterthought the bank was — on the rare occasions American financiers thought about it at all.

Katsuyama’s bosses sent him to New York from Toronto in 2002, when he was 23, as part of a “big push” for the bank to become a player on Wall Street.

The sad truth was that hardly anyone noticed it. “The people in Canada are always saying, ‘We’re paying too much for people in the United States,’ ” Katsuyama says. “What they don’t realize is that the reason you have to pay them too much is that no one wants to work for RBC. RBC is a nobody.”

An Adaptation From ‘Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,’ by Michael Lewis - NYTimes.com

cheatsheet:

Audience member at Columbia Journalism School to Arthur Sulzberger, New York Times publisher: “How will low-income residents now access The Times at home?”

Sulzberger: “Just translate that question to print. How will low-income people get access to The New York Times in print?”

(Source: thedailybeast.com)

I think the media story of the year, in 2010, was the New York Times’ discovery of Brooklyn. Once a day there’s a story about all the riches offered in that borough. There are young men and women wearing ironic glass frames on the streets. There are open air markets, like trading posts in the early Chippewa tribe, where you can make beads at home and then trade them for someone to come over and start a small fire in your apartment that you share with nine others. Artisanal cheeses. For sale, on the streets of an entire American borough. It’s been fascinating to watch the paper venture over the bridge. Venture through the tunnel. Go out to the outer reaches. The outer boroughs of the city. All different sections of the paper. They are making grilled cheese sandwiches in the streets… Yes, it’s just fantastic, it’s like Marrakesh over there… I’m leaving here to get to an artisanal market that just opened up today. It’s a flash artisanal market. The newest thing.

NBC’s Brian Williams on “Morning Joe,” via The Atlantic Wire. (via langer)

I’ve already posted the video, but these words bear repeating.

(via kateoplis)

(Source: langer, via kateoplis)