Posts tagged news
Murder in Juarez: Did a federal agent know an American was targeted for assassination and say nothing?
David Farrington, a U.S. Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS) service agent, has been vexed by a troubling question for the past several years. He has reason to suspect a colleague deliberately failed to warn an American working at a U.S. consulate in Mexico that she was targeted for assassination by a drug cartel.
Farrington, a former Marine and 10-year veteran of the State Department’s security service, was the first agent to get to the scene of the March 13, 2010, Juarez murders—another car carrying a consulate employee was attacked as well—and caught the case, as they say in police lingo. But his revulsion quickly turned to consternation, and then obsession, when he began asking questions about the whereabouts of the consulate’s chief security officer that day. Eventually, he was taken off the case, according to State Department emails obtained by Newsweek, relieved of his badge and gun, and ordered to undergo a psychological fitness review. But he hasn’t given up.
Leslie Enriquez and her husband were gunned down as they drove away from a birthday party in the drug-and-violence-wracked border city of Juarez four years ago last month. Nearly simultaneously, another car leaving the party was sprayed with bullets, killing the husband of a Mexican employee of the U.S. consulate. A senior Mexican police official said later that a drug cartel enforcer who confessed to the murders claimed Enriquez was targeted because she was helping a rival gang with U.S. visas—an allegation denied by U.S. officials. MORE

Murder in Juarez: Did a federal agent know an American was targeted for assassination and say nothing?

David Farrington, a U.S. Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS) service agent, has been vexed by a troubling question for the past several years. He has reason to suspect a colleague deliberately failed to warn an American working at a U.S. consulate in Mexico that she was targeted for assassination by a drug cartel.

Farrington, a former Marine and 10-year veteran of the State Department’s security service, was the first agent to get to the scene of the March 13, 2010, Juarez murders—another car carrying a consulate employee was attacked as well—and caught the case, as they say in police lingo. But his revulsion quickly turned to consternation, and then obsession, when he began asking questions about the whereabouts of the consulate’s chief security officer that day. Eventually, he was taken off the case, according to State Department emails obtained by Newsweek, relieved of his badge and gun, and ordered to undergo a psychological fitness review. But he hasn’t given up.

Leslie Enriquez and her husband were gunned down as they drove away from a birthday party in the drug-and-violence-wracked border city of Juarez four years ago last month. Nearly simultaneously, another car leaving the party was sprayed with bullets, killing the husband of a Mexican employee of the U.S. consulate. A senior Mexican police official said later that a drug cartel enforcer who confessed to the murders claimed Enriquez was targeted because she was helping a rival gang with U.S. visas—an allegation denied by U.S. officials. MORE

Inside Angelina Jolie’s campaign for justice for the survivors of Bosnia’s mass rapes
Edina, a Bosnian who lives near Srebrenica, was only 15 when she was captured along with a relative as they were foraging for food. Her family had fled to a forest. She was held for weeks and raped by five men. She says she survived because as it was happening, “I felt like I was someone else watching what was happening to me.”
In the two decades since those events, Edina has tried to rebuild her life. Today, she is a mother, but she has the air of a broken woman. She sits on a bench in the Srebrenica Memorial and chats with visitors—including Angelina Jolie—with dulled emotions. Although Edina testified in The Hague in 2005, none of the men who raped her have been brought to justice. She says that her rapists walk free—and are living not far from where she now lives.
"I know who they are," she tells Newsweek. "I found them on the Internet on Facebook."
Jolie, the actress and director, has returned to Bosnia with British Foreign Secretary William Hague to promote their partnership directed at preventing sexual violence in conflict. Rape during wartime is often treated as a lesser war crime, and their initiative is an attempt to galvanize political will to uphold international standards of justice.

Inside Angelina Jolie’s campaign for justice for the survivors of Bosnia’s mass rapes

Edina, a Bosnian who lives near Srebrenica, was only 15 when she was captured along with a relative as they were foraging for food. Her family had fled to a forest. She was held for weeks and raped by five men. She says she survived because as it was happening, “I felt like I was someone else watching what was happening to me.”

In the two decades since those events, Edina has tried to rebuild her life. Today, she is a mother, but she has the air of a broken woman. She sits on a bench in the Srebrenica Memorial and chats with visitors—including Angelina Jolie—with dulled emotions. Although Edina testified in The Hague in 2005, none of the men who raped her have been brought to justice. She says that her rapists walk free—and are living not far from where she now lives.

"I know who they are," she tells Newsweek. "I found them on the Internet on Facebook."

Jolie, the actress and director, has returned to Bosnia with British Foreign Secretary William Hague to promote their partnership directed at preventing sexual violence in conflict. Rape during wartime is often treated as a lesser war crime, and their initiative is an attempt to galvanize political will to uphold international standards of justice.

U.S. federal agents have uncovered two drug-smuggling tunnels underneath the U.S.-Mexico border, both surfacing in San Diego-area warehouses and equipped with rail systems for moving contraband, officials said on Friday.
The discovery led to the arrest of a 73-year-old woman accused of running one of the warehouses connected to a drug smuggling operation, according to a joint news release by four federal agencies.
The tunnels were discovered as part of a five-month investigation by the so-called San Diego Tunnel Task Force.
Federal law enforcement officials said the first tunnel, which connects a warehouse in Tijuana, Mexico, with one in an industrial park in the border community of Otay Mesa, is about 600 yards long and is furnished with lighting, a crude rail system and wooden trusses. The passageway is accessed via a 70-foot shaft secured by a cement cover and includes a pulley system on the U.S. side apparently intended to hoist contraband up into the warehouse.
The second tunnel was even more sophisticated, built with a multi-tiered electric rail system and an array of ventilation equipment.
via Two Drug Tunnels, with Rail Systems, Found at U.S.-Mexico Border
Photo credit: Ice/Reuters

U.S. federal agents have uncovered two drug-smuggling tunnels underneath the U.S.-Mexico border, both surfacing in San Diego-area warehouses and equipped with rail systems for moving contraband, officials said on Friday.

The discovery led to the arrest of a 73-year-old woman accused of running one of the warehouses connected to a drug smuggling operation, according to a joint news release by four federal agencies.

The tunnels were discovered as part of a five-month investigation by the so-called San Diego Tunnel Task Force.

Federal law enforcement officials said the first tunnel, which connects a warehouse in Tijuana, Mexico, with one in an industrial park in the border community of Otay Mesa, is about 600 yards long and is furnished with lighting, a crude rail system and wooden trusses. The passageway is accessed via a 70-foot shaft secured by a cement cover and includes a pulley system on the U.S. side apparently intended to hoist contraband up into the warehouse.

The second tunnel was even more sophisticated, built with a multi-tiered electric rail system and an array of ventilation equipment.

via Two Drug Tunnels, with Rail Systems, Found at U.S.-Mexico Border

Photo credit: Ice/Reuters

On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo
On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.
ZoomInfo

On the 46th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., his family is at war over his legacy.

Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.

A look at the design process behind this week’s cover with artist Diego Patiño.

After a Eubalaena glacialis whale dies, it floats. Moby-Dick-era whalers knew this and gave the species—treasured for its high blubber content—its common name: They’re the “right whale” to hunt. Now, with only around 500 of them left in the wild, North Atlantic right whales are the most endangered whale species in the world. 

Harpoons are no longer their enemy. Eight out of 10 right whales bear the scars left behind by accidental encounters with fishing rope, one Georgia wildlife official told Newsweek. These thick lines can wrap so tightly around the whales that they die from lacerations. 

Right whales are also uniquely disposed to collisions with ships. By nature, they swim toward boat noises, which often leads to gruesome accidents. Worse yet, as the oil and gas industry lobbies for permission to drill offshore, scientists say the deafening noise from seismic oil exploration could spawn devastating consequences. 

Extreme noise pollution has been known to kill hundreds of whales and dolphins at a time. In the worst case, they say it could someday lead to an extinction right before our eyes. 

"We’re filling their ocean with noise," says Christopher W. Clark, a senior scientist at Cornell University. He tells Newsweek that, "their whole social network is dependent on calling back and forth." 

It’s how they find food and stick together. He believes the constant groan of ship engines has already contributed to slow reproduction of the large, aquatic mammals. 

Whales Are Being Killed by Noise Pollution

After a Eubalaena glacialis whale dies, it floats. Moby-Dick-era whalers knew this and gave the species—treasured for its high blubber content—its common name: They’re the “right whale” to hunt. Now, with only around 500 of them left in the wild, North Atlantic right whales are the most endangered whale species in the world.

Harpoons are no longer their enemy. Eight out of 10 right whales bear the scars left behind by accidental encounters with fishing rope, one Georgia wildlife official told Newsweek. These thick lines can wrap so tightly around the whales that they die from lacerations.

Right whales are also uniquely disposed to collisions with ships. By nature, they swim toward boat noises, which often leads to gruesome accidents. Worse yet, as the oil and gas industry lobbies for permission to drill offshore, scientists say the deafening noise from seismic oil exploration could spawn devastating consequences.

Extreme noise pollution has been known to kill hundreds of whales and dolphins at a time. In the worst case, they say it could someday lead to an extinction right before our eyes.

"We’re filling their ocean with noise," says Christopher W. Clark, a senior scientist at Cornell University. He tells Newsweek that, "their whole social network is dependent on calling back and forth."

It’s how they find food and stick together. He believes the constant groan of ship engines has already contributed to slow reproduction of the large, aquatic mammals.

Whales Are Being Killed by Noise Pollution

Our latest cover story: The Family Feud Over Martin Luther King Jr.’s Legacy by Kurt Eichenwald.
Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.
Illustration by Diego Patiño, design by Priest + Grace.

Our latest cover story: The Family Feud Over Martin Luther King Jr.’s Legacy by Kurt Eichenwald.

Squabbles among the adult children of a famous patriarch are common, but the rancorous disputes of the King siblings—most of them over lucrative licensing deals for their father’s words and image—are rending family ties and friendships forged during some of the most harrowing battles of the civil rights movement.

Illustration by Diego Patiño, design by Priest + Grace.