Posts tagged newsweek
After that clip ends the general selects another. In this video, two men in the black uniform of the Nigerian police are on their knees in the bush in front of a black and white banner held up by two militants, which reads in Arabic: “There is only one God and Muhammad is his prophet.” 

Abu Sa’ad stands to one side, holding a book. The cameraman asks the two policemen to speak. The first gives his name as Corporal Mehmud Daba. 

“I know mine has ended,” he says. “My legacy is to ask my wife to please bring up our children in Islam. Let my mother hear this and pay all my debts for me.” 

The second policeman says his name is Sergeant David Hoya, a Christian. He does not raise his head but mumbles into the ground. 

“What is your message for your wife?” asks the cameraman. “That she should take care of my children.” “In Islam or as unbelievers?” “I’m not an unbeliever,” says Hoya. 

“How can they see you if your face is down like that?” asks the cameraman. “Lift your face up!” 

The camera turns to Abu Sa’ad. “I want to give an explanation for what we are about to do,” he says. “We are punishing in terms of what Allah prescribes. I want to tell Nigeria and the world that we give them the gift of these two policemen, this sergeant and corporal. We want to give these men the judgment of Allah.” Abu Sa’ad lifts up a book he is holding. 

“I am going to read from this book,” he says, showing the cover to the camera. It is an interpretation of the Kitab Tawheed, the Book of Unification, written by a conservative 13th century Saudi Islamist scholar called Sheikh Abdur-Rahman bin Hasan al Ash Sheikh. 

Abu Sa’ad begins a long monologue, showing the pages as he quotes from them. 

“We are going to do things in accordance with the book,” he repeats. “We will do this to anybody we catch. In Kano, we entered the police headquarters, and we killed them as they shat themselves. We did the same in Damaturu and Maiduguri. 

Let the world know that we will never compare anyone to God. No government, no constitution, can compare to God.” Ten minutes later, Abu Sa’ad finishes. 

“Let’s thank God and give him more bodies,” he concludes. He then pulls a knife from his combat vest, grabs Daba and lays him on his side. 

The crowd starts cheering: “Allahu Akbar! Allahu Akbar!” 

Two men hold Daba’s chest and legs. Abu Sa’ad holds his head with one hand, and starts sawing at Daba’s throat with the knife. Blood jets onto the sandy ground. Abu Sa’ad keeps sawing. 

He can’t get through the neck bone. He switches to the back of the neck and starts sawing again. Still the head won’t come off. Abu Sa’ad drops the knife and twists Daba’s head around with both hands, trying to snap it off. It doesn’t work. He picks up the knife and saws again. Finally, after half a minute, Daba’s head comes free. Abu Sa’ad lifts it up by the hair, shows it to the crowd. The eyes are closed. Flesh and ligaments are hanging loose. Abu Sa’ad places the head on the body. 

Boko Haram: Terror’s Insidious New Face

After that clip ends the general selects another. In this video, two men in the black uniform of the Nigerian police are on their knees in the bush in front of a black and white banner held up by two militants, which reads in Arabic: “There is only one God and Muhammad is his prophet.”

Abu Sa’ad stands to one side, holding a book. The cameraman asks the two policemen to speak. The first gives his name as Corporal Mehmud Daba.

“I know mine has ended,” he says. “My legacy is to ask my wife to please bring up our children in Islam. Let my mother hear this and pay all my debts for me.”

The second policeman says his name is Sergeant David Hoya, a Christian. He does not raise his head but mumbles into the ground.

“What is your message for your wife?” asks the cameraman. “That she should take care of my children.” “In Islam or as unbelievers?” “I’m not an unbeliever,” says Hoya.

“How can they see you if your face is down like that?” asks the cameraman. “Lift your face up!”

The camera turns to Abu Sa’ad. “I want to give an explanation for what we are about to do,” he says. “We are punishing in terms of what Allah prescribes. I want to tell Nigeria and the world that we give them the gift of these two policemen, this sergeant and corporal. We want to give these men the judgment of Allah.” Abu Sa’ad lifts up a book he is holding.

“I am going to read from this book,” he says, showing the cover to the camera. It is an interpretation of the Kitab Tawheed, the Book of Unification, written by a conservative 13th century Saudi Islamist scholar called Sheikh Abdur-Rahman bin Hasan al Ash Sheikh.

Abu Sa’ad begins a long monologue, showing the pages as he quotes from them.

“We are going to do things in accordance with the book,” he repeats. “We will do this to anybody we catch. In Kano, we entered the police headquarters, and we killed them as they shat themselves. We did the same in Damaturu and Maiduguri.

Let the world know that we will never compare anyone to God. No government, no constitution, can compare to God.” Ten minutes later, Abu Sa’ad finishes.

“Let’s thank God and give him more bodies,” he concludes. He then pulls a knife from his combat vest, grabs Daba and lays him on his side.

The crowd starts cheering: “Allahu Akbar! Allahu Akbar!”

Two men hold Daba’s chest and legs. Abu Sa’ad holds his head with one hand, and starts sawing at Daba’s throat with the knife. Blood jets onto the sandy ground. Abu Sa’ad keeps sawing.

He can’t get through the neck bone. He switches to the back of the neck and starts sawing again. Still the head won’t come off. Abu Sa’ad drops the knife and twists Daba’s head around with both hands, trying to snap it off. It doesn’t work. He picks up the knife and saws again. Finally, after half a minute, Daba’s head comes free. Abu Sa’ad lifts it up by the hair, shows it to the crowd. The eyes are closed. Flesh and ligaments are hanging loose. Abu Sa’ad places the head on the body.

Boko Haram: Terror’s Insidious New Face

“Initially, I focused on breathing,” she recalls. “Then as I went down, I started to relax. I could see a group of human-like figures with their heads up as if they were looking up at me from below. As I got closer, I could see red, green and blue coral growing from the heads and bodies. I was amazed by the brightly colored fish swimming between the figures that were standing at the bottom of the sea. It was as if the life-sized sculptures were coming alive.” 
This dive was Shoebridge’s first encounter with the spectacular work of British-Guyanan underwater artist Jason deCaires Taylor, which has been compared to that of fellow Briton Antony Gormley (famous for the 66-foot-tall Angel of the North statue in Gateshead, England). 
An Underwater Art Scene Blossoms in the Ocean (Complete gallery) 
ZoomInfo
“Initially, I focused on breathing,” she recalls. “Then as I went down, I started to relax. I could see a group of human-like figures with their heads up as if they were looking up at me from below. As I got closer, I could see red, green and blue coral growing from the heads and bodies. I was amazed by the brightly colored fish swimming between the figures that were standing at the bottom of the sea. It was as if the life-sized sculptures were coming alive.” 
This dive was Shoebridge’s first encounter with the spectacular work of British-Guyanan underwater artist Jason deCaires Taylor, which has been compared to that of fellow Briton Antony Gormley (famous for the 66-foot-tall Angel of the North statue in Gateshead, England). 
An Underwater Art Scene Blossoms in the Ocean (Complete gallery) 
ZoomInfo
“Initially, I focused on breathing,” she recalls. “Then as I went down, I started to relax. I could see a group of human-like figures with their heads up as if they were looking up at me from below. As I got closer, I could see red, green and blue coral growing from the heads and bodies. I was amazed by the brightly colored fish swimming between the figures that were standing at the bottom of the sea. It was as if the life-sized sculptures were coming alive.” 
This dive was Shoebridge’s first encounter with the spectacular work of British-Guyanan underwater artist Jason deCaires Taylor, which has been compared to that of fellow Briton Antony Gormley (famous for the 66-foot-tall Angel of the North statue in Gateshead, England). 
An Underwater Art Scene Blossoms in the Ocean (Complete gallery) 
ZoomInfo

“Initially, I focused on breathing,” she recalls. “Then as I went down, I started to relax. I could see a group of human-like figures with their heads up as if they were looking up at me from below. As I got closer, I could see red, green and blue coral growing from the heads and bodies. I was amazed by the brightly colored fish swimming between the figures that were standing at the bottom of the sea. It was as if the life-sized sculptures were coming alive.” 

This dive was Shoebridge’s first encounter with the spectacular work of British-Guyanan underwater artist Jason deCaires Taylor, which has been compared to that of fellow Briton Antony Gormley (famous for the 66-foot-tall Angel of the North statue in Gateshead, England). 

An Underwater Art Scene Blossoms in the Ocean (Complete gallery) 

Frontiers Without Medicine

It did not take long for the infant to die. A half hour after her parents brought her into the makeshift emergency room lit by hazy flashlights, she was gone. 

The 26-year-old doctor, a third-year resident, worked frantically over her lifeless body. He had not slept for a day, but he was determined to save her life. The doctor, who goes by just the name Dr. Hamza, lost the battle. 

After a few minutes’ resuscitation, the girl died. The doctor wrapped a triangular cloth around the small corpse. Her mother slumped on a chair, in shock. Her father paced the room. 

They had not yet named her. This baby did not die of shrapnel wounds or a sniper’s bullet. She died from a respiratory illness. 

According to the charity Save the Children, the majority of children’s diseases in Syria-measles, diarrhea and respiratory illnesses-are treatable. 

"When I see a wizened dead baby," said one U.N. officer. "I think: did they really die of starvation? Or did they die of some horrible disease? Or even a treatable one they can’t get drugs for?" 

Sixty percent of the hospitals in Syria are damaged or destroyed; half the doctors have fled the country. Medicine is heading backward several centuries.

Frontiers Without Medicine

It did not take long for the infant to die. A half hour after her parents brought her into the makeshift emergency room lit by hazy flashlights, she was gone.

The 26-year-old doctor, a third-year resident, worked frantically over her lifeless body. He had not slept for a day, but he was determined to save her life. The doctor, who goes by just the name Dr. Hamza, lost the battle.

After a few minutes’ resuscitation, the girl died. The doctor wrapped a triangular cloth around the small corpse. Her mother slumped on a chair, in shock. Her father paced the room.

They had not yet named her. This baby did not die of shrapnel wounds or a sniper’s bullet. She died from a respiratory illness.

According to the charity Save the Children, the majority of children’s diseases in Syria-measles, diarrhea and respiratory illnesses-are treatable.

"When I see a wizened dead baby," said one U.N. officer. "I think: did they really die of starvation? Or did they die of some horrible disease? Or even a treatable one they can’t get drugs for?"

Sixty percent of the hospitals in Syria are damaged or destroyed; half the doctors have fled the country. Medicine is heading backward several centuries.

Newsweek Rewind: Our First Article About the Web, Which Just Turned 25
On March 12, 1989, British computer scientist Sir Tim Berners-Lee proposed an “information management” system that would become known as the Web. We celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of his world-changing invention on the first edition of our new weekly feature, Newsweek Rewind. We dug through our archive and pulled our first article about the Web, from our October 31, 1994 issue. Click here for the full text of the piece, “Oh, what a Tangled Web,” by Barbara Kantrowitz with Adam Rogers and Jennifer Tanaka.

Newsweek Rewind: Our First Article About the Web, Which Just Turned 25

On March 12, 1989, British computer scientist Sir Tim Berners-Lee proposed an “information management” system that would become known as the Web. We celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of his world-changing invention on the first edition of our new weekly feature, Newsweek Rewind. We dug through our archive and pulled our first article about the Web, from our October 31, 1994 issue. Click here for the full text of the piece, “Oh, what a Tangled Web,” by Barbara Kantrowitz with Adam Rogers and Jennifer Tanaka.

Newsweek recently published the article “Sex and the Single Tween” by Abigail Jones and it’s a fascinating read about tweens, and girls and sexualization in particular. It’s a lengthy piece, though, and I was struck how just breaking down some of the numbers included in it offers interesting insight into the world of tweens.
If there were fewer possible psychiatric diagnoses, would fewer people consider themselves ill? 

A growing number of health experts suspect that psychiatric care is drifting toward “diagnostic inflation,” in which the rate of mental disorders balloons as a result of new diagnoses - and not due to an increasingly troubled population. What’s worse is that this process may be fueled by the very document that is supposed to control it. 

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), a 1,000-page behemoth that is now in its fifth edition, gives researchers and clinicians across the country a common language for discussing the ins and outs of a mind that is not well, ideally allowing everyone to agree on who is and isn’t ill. 

The manual is produced by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). Although the APA has insisted that its signature document should not be read as a rulebook, with definitions set in stone, a publication of this scope and caliber inevitably shapes the field. 

If the DSM-5 says your pain doesn’t align with its definition of pain, you can be certain that, in the eyes of most psychiatrists, lawyers and policy makers, you’re not in pain. ('A Pill for Every Ill')

If there were fewer possible psychiatric diagnoses, would fewer people consider themselves ill?

A growing number of health experts suspect that psychiatric care is drifting toward “diagnostic inflation,” in which the rate of mental disorders balloons as a result of new diagnoses - and not due to an increasingly troubled population. What’s worse is that this process may be fueled by the very document that is supposed to control it.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), a 1,000-page behemoth that is now in its fifth edition, gives researchers and clinicians across the country a common language for discussing the ins and outs of a mind that is not well, ideally allowing everyone to agree on who is and isn’t ill.

The manual is produced by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). Although the APA has insisted that its signature document should not be read as a rulebook, with definitions set in stone, a publication of this scope and caliber inevitably shapes the field.

If the DSM-5 says your pain doesn’t align with its definition of pain, you can be certain that, in the eyes of most psychiatrists, lawyers and policy makers, you’re not in pain. ('A Pill for Every Ill')