Posts tagged newsweek
Newsweek recently published the article “Sex and the Single Tween” by Abigail Jones and it’s a fascinating read about tweens, and girls and sexualization in particular. It’s a lengthy piece, though, and I was struck how just breaking down some of the numbers included in it offers interesting insight into the world of tweens.
If there were fewer possible psychiatric diagnoses, would fewer people consider themselves ill? 

A growing number of health experts suspect that psychiatric care is drifting toward “diagnostic inflation,” in which the rate of mental disorders balloons as a result of new diagnoses - and not due to an increasingly troubled population. What’s worse is that this process may be fueled by the very document that is supposed to control it. 

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), a 1,000-page behemoth that is now in its fifth edition, gives researchers and clinicians across the country a common language for discussing the ins and outs of a mind that is not well, ideally allowing everyone to agree on who is and isn’t ill. 

The manual is produced by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). Although the APA has insisted that its signature document should not be read as a rulebook, with definitions set in stone, a publication of this scope and caliber inevitably shapes the field. 

If the DSM-5 says your pain doesn’t align with its definition of pain, you can be certain that, in the eyes of most psychiatrists, lawyers and policy makers, you’re not in pain. ('A Pill for Every Ill')

If there were fewer possible psychiatric diagnoses, would fewer people consider themselves ill?

A growing number of health experts suspect that psychiatric care is drifting toward “diagnostic inflation,” in which the rate of mental disorders balloons as a result of new diagnoses - and not due to an increasingly troubled population. What’s worse is that this process may be fueled by the very document that is supposed to control it.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), a 1,000-page behemoth that is now in its fifth edition, gives researchers and clinicians across the country a common language for discussing the ins and outs of a mind that is not well, ideally allowing everyone to agree on who is and isn’t ill.

The manual is produced by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). Although the APA has insisted that its signature document should not be read as a rulebook, with definitions set in stone, a publication of this scope and caliber inevitably shapes the field.

If the DSM-5 says your pain doesn’t align with its definition of pain, you can be certain that, in the eyes of most psychiatrists, lawyers and policy makers, you’re not in pain. ('A Pill for Every Ill')

Happy 81st Birthday to us! 
The first issue of Newsweek was published in 1933 and covered a wide-range of topics that… pretty much reflect the issues we’re facing today, from dog sledding in Central Park on a balmy day that reminded the author of ‘Alaska in spring time,’ to a president who may be awarded ‘extraordinary powers’ in wartime.  
The magazine was founded by editor Samuel T. Williamson, and run from a Dayton, Ohio headquarters. 
It cost $4/year to subscribe. 
ZoomInfo
Happy 81st Birthday to us! 
The first issue of Newsweek was published in 1933 and covered a wide-range of topics that… pretty much reflect the issues we’re facing today, from dog sledding in Central Park on a balmy day that reminded the author of ‘Alaska in spring time,’ to a president who may be awarded ‘extraordinary powers’ in wartime.  
The magazine was founded by editor Samuel T. Williamson, and run from a Dayton, Ohio headquarters. 
It cost $4/year to subscribe. 
ZoomInfo
Happy 81st Birthday to us! 
The first issue of Newsweek was published in 1933 and covered a wide-range of topics that… pretty much reflect the issues we’re facing today, from dog sledding in Central Park on a balmy day that reminded the author of ‘Alaska in spring time,’ to a president who may be awarded ‘extraordinary powers’ in wartime.  
The magazine was founded by editor Samuel T. Williamson, and run from a Dayton, Ohio headquarters. 
It cost $4/year to subscribe. 
ZoomInfo
Happy 81st Birthday to us! 
The first issue of Newsweek was published in 1933 and covered a wide-range of topics that… pretty much reflect the issues we’re facing today, from dog sledding in Central Park on a balmy day that reminded the author of ‘Alaska in spring time,’ to a president who may be awarded ‘extraordinary powers’ in wartime.  
The magazine was founded by editor Samuel T. Williamson, and run from a Dayton, Ohio headquarters. 
It cost $4/year to subscribe. 
ZoomInfo

Happy 81st Birthday to us! 

The first issue of Newsweek was published in 1933 and covered a wide-range of topics that… pretty much reflect the issues we’re facing today, from dog sledding in Central Park on a balmy day that reminded the author of ‘Alaska in spring time,’ to a president who may be awarded ‘extraordinary powers’ in wartime.  

The magazine was founded by editor Samuel T. Williamson, and run from a Dayton, Ohio headquarters. 

It cost $4/year to subscribe. 

Here’s an un-fun experiment: the next time your kid’s in the other room, sneak a peek at her science textbook. Chances are, it says evolution is just a theory and global warming is debatable. 

If you’re living in Louisiana or Tennessee, you may also want to check out what your kids’ teachers are discussing in class: Teachers in those states are now allowed to teach creationism along with evolution and to argue both sides of global warming - even over the objections of their school principals and superintendents. 

In 2013, nine anti-science bills were introduced in seven states, and legislators nationwide have filed about 50 bills in the past 10 years declaring evolution a “controversial” idea whose opposing side, creationism, must be taught in the interest of academic freedom. Though most of these efforts died in committee - as South Dakota’s did last week - some become law. 

It’s all being done under the guise of fairness: Missouri’s House Bill 1587, creeping toward a vote, would force principals and administrators to let teachers “help students understand, analyze, critique, and review in an objective manner the scientific strengths and scientific weaknesses of the theory of biological and hypotheses of chemical evolution.” 

The bill’s authors say it’ll help students “develop critical thinking skills, and respond appropriately and respectfully to differences of opinion about controversial issues, including biological and chemical evolution.” 

MORE: A Textbook Case of Anti-Science)

Here’s an un-fun experiment: the next time your kid’s in the other room, sneak a peek at her science textbook. Chances are, it says evolution is just a theory and global warming is debatable.

If you’re living in Louisiana or Tennessee, you may also want to check out what your kids’ teachers are discussing in class: Teachers in those states are now allowed to teach creationism along with evolution and to argue both sides of global warming - even over the objections of their school principals and superintendents.

In 2013, nine anti-science bills were introduced in seven states, and legislators nationwide have filed about 50 bills in the past 10 years declaring evolution a “controversial” idea whose opposing side, creationism, must be taught in the interest of academic freedom. Though most of these efforts died in committee - as South Dakota’s did last week - some become law.

It’s all being done under the guise of fairness: Missouri’s House Bill 1587, creeping toward a vote, would force principals and administrators to let teachers “help students understand, analyze, critique, and review in an objective manner the scientific strengths and scientific weaknesses of the theory of biological and hypotheses of chemical evolution.”

The bill’s authors say it’ll help students “develop critical thinking skills, and respond appropriately and respectfully to differences of opinion about controversial issues, including biological and chemical evolution.”

MORE: A Textbook Case of Anti-Science)

LGBT Moments in Figure-Skating Historyhttp://www.newsweek.com/lgbt-moments-figure-skating-history-227576

drinkingcocoa-tpp:

Here’s a timeline of a few notable moments in queer skating history.  I contributed in a minor way to a few of these moments.  I wrote about the first Olympic-eligible out gay skater in the U.S., Doug Mattis, for the Advocatein 1996.  I wrote the technical appendix for Rudy Galindo’s autobiography, Icebreaker, in 1997.  There’s nothing dirty about the rich, supportive, creative queer culture within figure skating; the dirtiness is about what happens when homophobia and gaybashing hurt the sport and the athletes, and how people within the sport react, in their various ways, sometimes oppressively, to the fear around that oppression.

And in case you’re wondering:  yes, there are bisexuals in skating.  And queer women.  No, not all the men are gay or queer.  My guess is that between half and two thirds of male North American skaters are straight, and the numbers are higher outside North America.  But that’s just a guess, based on very unreliable estimates, and I’ve never been a skater.  No, you can’t always tell by looking which male skaters are queer.  Some of the femmiest-looking ones are straight.

Love and courage to all skaters of all orientations going to Sochi, and the officials and judges and families who are going as well.  Be safe and strong and brave, dear people.

scienceisbeauty:

This might be tagged as ASFW (“Almost Safe For Work”): 

For the first time, a massive data set of 10,000 porn stars has been extracted from the world’s largest database of adult films and performers. I’ve spent the last six months analyzing it to discover the truth about what the average performer looks like, what they do on film, and how their role has evolved over the last forty years.

Source: Deep Inside - A Study of 10,000 Porn Stars (Jon Millward)
High res - full infographic

scienceisbeauty:

This might be tagged as ASFW (“Almost Safe For Work”): 

For the first time, a massive data set of 10,000 porn stars has been extracted from the world’s largest database of adult films and performers. I’ve spent the last six months analyzing it to discover the truth about what the average performer looks like, what they do on film, and how their role has evolved over the last forty years.

Source: Deep Inside - A Study of 10,000 Porn Stars (Jon Millward)

High res - full infographic

Remember the Newsweek story a few weeks ago about the massacre of indigenous people in Ecuador? The country’s leadership sure does. 
President Rafael Correa addressed us in an acerbic speech last weekend and this week, Ecuadorian Ambassador to the United States Nathalie Ciely sent Newsweek a sternly worded letter, accusing reporter, Bethany Horne of being an “anti-government activist,” among other things. 
Horne, who until recently worked for a pro-government newspaper, responded.

Remember the Newsweek story a few weeks ago about the massacre of indigenous people in Ecuador? The country’s leadership sure does.

President Rafael Correa addressed us in an acerbic speech last weekend and this week, Ecuadorian Ambassador to the United States Nathalie Ciely sent Newsweek a sternly worded letter, accusing reporter, Bethany Horne of being an “anti-government activist,” among other things. 

Horne, who until recently worked for a pro-government newspaper, responded.