Posts tagged nypd
When I heard that my 21-year-old son, a student at Harvard, had been stopped by New York City police on more than one occasion during the brief summer he spent as a Wall Street intern, I was angry. 

On one occasion, while wearing his best business suit, he was forced to lie face-down on a filthy sidewalk because—well, let’s be honest about it, because of the color of his skin. As an attorney and a college professor who teaches criminal justice classes, I knew that his constitutional rights had been violated. 

As a parent, I feared for his safety at the hands of the police—a fear that I feel every single day, whether he is in New York or elsewhere. 

Moreover, as the white father of an African-American son, I am keenly aware that I never face the suspicion and indignities that my son continuously confronts. In fact, all of the men among my African-American in-laws—and I literally mean every single one of them—can tell multiple stories of unjustified investigatory police stops of the sort that not a single one of my white male relatives has ever experienced. 

What I Learned About Stop-and-Frisk From Watching My Black Son - The Atlantic

When I heard that my 21-year-old son, a student at Harvard, had been stopped by New York City police on more than one occasion during the brief summer he spent as a Wall Street intern, I was angry.

On one occasion, while wearing his best business suit, he was forced to lie face-down on a filthy sidewalk because—well, let’s be honest about it, because of the color of his skin. As an attorney and a college professor who teaches criminal justice classes, I knew that his constitutional rights had been violated.

As a parent, I feared for his safety at the hands of the police—a fear that I feel every single day, whether he is in New York or elsewhere.

Moreover, as the white father of an African-American son, I am keenly aware that I never face the suspicion and indignities that my son continuously confronts. In fact, all of the men among my African-American in-laws—and I literally mean every single one of them—can tell multiple stories of unjustified investigatory police stops of the sort that not a single one of my white male relatives has ever experienced.

What I Learned About Stop-and-Frisk From Watching My Black Son - The Atlantic

NYC police commissioner Ray Kelly holds up bloody fragments of a bullet taken earlier this evening from the base of an NYPD officer’s skull. The officer survived the gunshot. The perp is in custody. The bullet may go down as a very strange prop in NYC history.

NYC police commissioner Ray Kelly holds up bloody fragments of a bullet taken earlier this evening from the base of an NYPD officer’s skull. The officer survived the gunshot. The perp is in custody. The bullet may go down as a very strange prop in NYC history.

Our reporter Michelle Goldberg, on the scene at #OWS this AM, captures a pretty killer quote from a young cop to a protester.

Occupier: “You should love these guys. Think of all the overtime.” 
NYPD: “I do love them. I lock up criminals, not protesters.”

Follow her.

Our reporter Michelle Goldberg, on the scene at #OWS this AM, captures a pretty killer quote from a young cop to a protester.

Occupier: “You should love these guys. Think of all the overtime.” 

NYPD: “I do love them. I lock up criminals, not protesters.”

Follow her.

The full video has emerged depicting the scene earlier this morning when a Legal Aid Society observer was photographed getting run over by an NYPD scooter.

What we can tell from this: not much, in terms of the claim that he purposely put his foot under the scooter (“I saw him sticking his legs under the bike to make it appear he was run over,” per the Daily News’s photographer who was there.).

It’s pretty clear he was arrested—albeit quite violently, he gets rag-dolled a bit—for kicking over the scooter. The question, then, is did the cop get up and leave the scooter parked on this man’s foot? Or did the man overreact—putting his foot under the scooter and kicking it to cause a scene?

There’s NYPD brass with guns on buses saying ‘Move the bus, this bus is now under the control of the NYPD. What room to protest is there? It’s not a transit supervisor you’re dealing with.
New York Transport Workers Union Local 100 President John Samuelsen • Discussing the way that the Brooklyn Bridge Occupy Wall Street arrests went down, particularly how the NYPD commandeered buses to arrest protesters en masse. The union is seeking injunctions (preliminary and permanent) against the NYPD to prevent them from doing this again. “The actions of the NYPD on Oct. 1, 2011, amounted to a seizure of the bus drivers,” the union’s lawyer, Arthur Schwartz, claimed in court. Will be curious to see how this goes. source (viafollow)

(Source: shortformblog)

To Catch a Creep: Inside the NYPD's Special Victims Unithttp://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2011-05-30/inside-the-nypds-special-victims-division/

How do you know who’s lying and who’s telling the truth about a rape? These cops crack New York’s most shocking sex crimes, from no-name scoundrels to big-power suspects like former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn and Egyptian banker Mahmoud Abdel-Salam Omar, arrested at the Pierre Hotel on Monday. In this week’s NEWSWEEK, NYPD expert and Paris Bureau Chief Christopher Dickey profiles the Special Victims Division. (via newsweek-paris-france)