Posts tagged oSama bin laden
After Osama bin Laden was killed in a covert nighttime raid in Pakistan three years ago today, public attention quickly focused on the men (and the dog) at the sharp end of the spear: the members of SEAL Team 6 who did the deed. The mission has been dramatized in the film Zero Dark Thirty and recounted in countless articles, and it has spurred debate about torture as well as the fraught U.S.-Pakistan relationship. 

The Special Forces operatives who carried out the mission have been lauded in the years since, but as Tony Dokoupil points out in this article from the May 16, 2011, issue of Newsweek, the SEALs’ record hasn’t always been so stellar. Historically, the Navy has struggled to recruit people to a program that’s had its share of failures. 

Dokoupil’s article brings interesting facts to light: that a typical SEAL is more likely to be a lacrosse or water polo player than a football player, that most senior team members are typically older than you might think, and that they’ve even admitted, in 1987, to misdemeanors like forging travel receipts. 

Our story: The Coolest Guys in the World 

Newsweek Rewind: Inside Seal Team 6)

After Osama bin Laden was killed in a covert nighttime raid in Pakistan three years ago today, public attention quickly focused on the men (and the dog) at the sharp end of the spear: the members of SEAL Team 6 who did the deed. The mission has been dramatized in the film Zero Dark Thirty and recounted in countless articles, and it has spurred debate about torture as well as the fraught U.S.-Pakistan relationship.

The Special Forces operatives who carried out the mission have been lauded in the years since, but as Tony Dokoupil points out in this article from the May 16, 2011, issue of Newsweek, the SEALs’ record hasn’t always been so stellar. Historically, the Navy has struggled to recruit people to a program that’s had its share of failures.

Dokoupil’s article brings interesting facts to light: that a typical SEAL is more likely to be a lacrosse or water polo player than a football player, that most senior team members are typically older than you might think, and that they’ve even admitted, in 1987, to misdemeanors like forging travel receipts.

Our story: The Coolest Guys in the World

Newsweek Rewind: Inside Seal Team 6)

Received phone call from Tom Donilon who stated that the President made a decision with regard to AC1 [Abbottabad Compound 1]. The decision is to proceed with the assault. The timing, operational decision making and control are in Admiral McRaven’s hands. The approval is provided on the risk profile presented to the President. Any additional risks are to be brought back to the President for his consideration. The direction is to go in and get bin Laden and if he is not there, to get out. Those instructions were conveyed to Admiral McRaven at approximately 10:45 am.

"Photography editors and designers explain why *the picture* is destined to be one for the history books."http://www.wwd.com/media-news?module=tn#/article/media-news/peak-time-3601104?navSection=media-news

NWK’s Scott Hall: “What’s most interesting to me about this photo is what you’re not seeing. The mystery of what’s happening off camera is captured wholly in the expression on Hillary’s face. The events of 9/11 unfolded before our eyes, but those of 5/1 leave much to the imagination.”

cheatsheet:

Navy SEAL trainees bounce off the bottom of the tank to catch their breath during the Drown Proofing Test at the Combat Training Tank. The trainees have their feet and hands tied and once freed they swim to safety.

The SEALs: America’s quietest killers. This gallery is pretty amazing.

cheatsheet:

Navy SEAL trainees bounce off the bottom of the tank to catch their breath during the Drown Proofing Test at the Combat Training Tank. The trainees have their feet and hands tied and once freed they swim to safety.

The SEALs: America’s quietest killers. This gallery is pretty amazing.

From the archives: 

The Americans were getting close. It was early in the winter of 2004–05, and Osama bin Laden and his entourage were holed up in a mountain hideaway along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border. Suddenly, a sentry, posted several kilometers away, spotted a patrol of U.S. soldiers who seemed to be heading straight for bin Laden’s redoubt. The sentry radioed an alert, and word quickly passed among the Qaeda leader’s 40-odd bodyguards to prepare to remove “the Sheik,” as bin Laden is known to his followers, to a fallback position.

Read Newsweek’s “Into Thin Air" feature from September 03, 2007.